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Eastern Bankshares, Inc. - Quarter Report: 2020 June (Form 10-Q)

10-Q
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

(Mark one)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2020

Or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 333-239251

 

 

Eastern Bankshares, Inc.

(Exact name of the registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Massachusetts   84-4199750
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
265 Franklin Street, Boston, Massachusetts   02110
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(800) 327-8376

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    ☐  Yes    ☒  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    ☒  Yes    ☐  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer  
Non-accelerated filer      Smaller reporting company  
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Emerging Growth Company  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  ☐  Yes    ☒  No

No shares of the Registrant’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share, were issued and outstanding as of September 23, 2020.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Index

 

         PAGE  

PART I.

 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

  

ITEM 1.

 

Financial Statements

  
 

Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets

     2  
 

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Income

     4  
 

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

     6  
 

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity

     7  
 

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     8  
 

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

     10  

ITEM 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     55  

ITEM 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

     85  

ITEM 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

     85  

PART II.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

  

ITEM 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

     86  

ITEM 1A.

 

Risk Factors

     86  

ITEM 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

     86  

ITEM 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

     86  

ITEM 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

     86  

ITEM 5.

 

Other Information

     86  

ITEM 6.

 

Exhibits

     86  

EXHIBIT INDEX

       87  

SIGNATURES

     89  


Table of Contents
     Page  

Part I Financial Information

  

Item 1. Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

  

Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June  30, 2020 and December 31, 2019

     2  

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019

     4  

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019

     6  

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019

     7  

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019

     8  

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

     10  


Table of Contents

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

EASTERN BANK CORPORATION

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

     As of June 30,     As of
December 31,
 
     2020     2019  
     (In Thousands)  

ASSETS

    

Cash and due from banks

   $ 67,264     $ 135,503  

Short-term investments

     1,365,297       227,099  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

     1,432,561       362,602  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Securities:

    

Trading

     —         961  

Available for sale

     1,600,354       1,508,236  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total securities

     1,600,354       1,509,197  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans held for sale

     2,972       26  

Loans:

    

Commercial and industrial

     2,271,700       1,642,184  

Commercial real estate

     3,584,358       3,535,441  

Commercial construction

     282,246       273,774  

Business banking

     1,234,961       771,498  

Residential real estate

     1,400,855       1,428,630  

Consumer home equity

     905,484       933,088  

Other consumer

     334,734       402,431  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Loans

     10,014,338       8,987,046  

Less: allowance for loan losses

     (116,636     (82,297

Less: unamortized premiums, net of unearned discounts and deferred fees

     (34,722     (5,565
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Loans

     9,862,980       8,899,184  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Federal Home Loan Bank stock, at cost

     8,805       9,027  

Premises and equipment

     52,475       57,453  

Bank-owned life insurance

     77,528       77,546  

Goodwill and other intangibles, net

     376,331       377,734  

Deferred income taxes, net

     7,663       28,207  

Prepaid expenses

     92,517       61,336  

Other assets

     482,337       246,463  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Assets

   $ 13,996,523     $ 11,628,775  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

     

Deposits:

     

Demand

   $ 4,740,125      $ 3,517,447  

Interest checking accounts

     2,385,912        1,814,327  

Savings accounts

     1,157,606        971,119  

Money market investment

     3,254,202        2,919,360  

Certificate of deposits

     308,920        329,139  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total deposits

     11,846,765        9,551,392  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Borrowed funds:

     

Federal funds purchased

     —          201,082  

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

     14,922        18,964  

Escrow deposits of borrowers

     14,233        15,349  
  

 

 

    

Total borrowed funds

     29,155        235,395  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Other liabilities

     426,973        241,835  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

     12,302,893        10,028,622  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

     

Retained earnings

     1,681,164        1,644,000  

Accumulated other comprehensive income, net of tax

     12,466        (43,847
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total equity

     1,693,630        1,600,153  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 13,996,523      $ 11,628,775  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

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EASTERN BANK CORPORATION

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

 

     Three months ended June 30,     Six months ended June 30,  
     2020     2019     2020     2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Interest and dividend income:

        

Interest and fees on loans

   $ 92,143     $ 102,216     $ 187,681     $ 202,772  

Taxable interest and dividends on available for sale securities

     7,600       7,901       15,778       15,953  

Non-taxable interest and dividends on available for sale securities

     1,905       2,049       3,826       4,403  

Interest on federal funds sold and other short-term investments

     284       612       801       965  

Interest and dividends on trading securities

     1       60       6       228  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest and dividend income

     101,933       112,838       208,092       224,321  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Interest expense:

        

Interest on deposits

     3,104       7,313       8,518       13,832  

Interest on borrowings

     74       2,002       673       4,294  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest expense

     3,178       9,315       9,191       18,126  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income

     98,755       103,523       198,901       206,195  

Provision for allowance for credit losses

     8,600       1,500       37,200       4,500  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income after provision for credit losses

     90,155       102,023       161,701       201,695  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Noninterest income:

        

Insurance commissions

     22,697       24,135       50,174       48,897  

Service charges on deposit accounts

     4,364       6,771       10,462       13,175  

Trust and investment advisory fees

     5,194       4,980       10,289       9,608  

Debit card processing fees

     2,337       2,638       4,807       5,048  

Interest rate swap income (losses)

     771       (810     (5,238     (470

Income from investments held in rabbi trusts

     7,745       1,822       1,002       5,969  

(Losses) gains on trading securities, net

     (1     152       (3     1,294  

Gains on sales of mortgage loans held for sale, net

     1,420       159       1,513       209  

Gains on sales of securities available for sale, net

     163       1,966       285       2,016  

Other

     2,967       3,819       7,735       7,686  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total noninterest income

     47,657       45,632       81,026       93,432  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Noninterest expense:

        

Salaries and employee benefits

     63,335       62,364       124,924       129,670  

Office occupancy and equipment

     8,615       8,383       17,304       17,182  

Data processing

     12,180       10,912       22,184       21,588  

 

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Professional services

     4,396       3,966       8,085       7,104  

Charitable contributions

     2,797       3,683       3,984       7,331  

Marketing

     1,645       2,683       4,113       4,406  

Loan expenses

     2,036       886       3,148       1,551  

FDIC insurance

     944       927       1,850       1,800  

Amortization of intangible assets

     701       886       1,403       1,773  

Net periodic benefit cost, excluding service cost

     (2,443     (1,334     (4,885     (2,668

Other

     6,559       8,214       13,827       16,662  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total noninterest expense

     100,765       101,570       195,937       206,399  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income tax expense

     37,047       46,085       46,790       88,728  

Income tax expense

     7,197       11,032       8,495       20,710  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income

   $ 29,850     $ 35,053     $ 38,295     $ 68,018  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

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EASTERN BANK CORPORATION

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,      Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020     2019      2020      2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Net income

   $ 29,850     $ 35,053      $ 38,295      $ 68,018  
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:

          

Net change in fair value of securities available for sale

     287       10,134        26,479        35,124  

Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges

     (2,645     11,375        26,430        15,377  

Net change in other comprehensive income for defined benefit postretirement plans

     3,404       —          3,404        —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive income

     1,046       21,509        56,313        50,501  
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

   $ 30,896     $ 56,562      $ 94,608      $ 118,519  
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

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EASTERN BANK CORPORATION

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

 

     Retained
Earnings
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive

Income
    Total  
     (In Thousands)  

Balance at December 31, 2019

   $ 1,644,000     $ (43,847   $ 1,600,153  

Cumulative effect accounting adjustment (1)

     (1,131       (1,131

Net income

     8,445       —         8,445  

Other comprehensive income, net of tax

     —         55,267       55,267  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2020

   $ 1,651,314     $ 11,420     $ 1,662,734  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     29,850       —         29,850  

Other comprehensive income, net of tax

     —         1,046       1,046  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2020

   $ 1,681,164     $ 12,466     $ 1,693,630  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2018

   $ 1,508,902     $ (75,761   $ 1,433,141  

Net income

     32,965       —         32,965  

Other comprehensive income, net of tax

     —         28,992       28,992  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2019

   $ 1,541,867     $ (46,769   $ 1,495,098  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     35,053       —         35,053  

Other comprehensive income, net of tax

     —         21,509       21,509  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2019

   $ 1,576,920     $ (25,260   $ 1,551,660  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Represents cumulative impact on retained earnings pursuant to the Company’s adoption of Accounting Standards Update 2016-02 Leases. The transition adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings on January 1, 2020 amounted to $1.1 million, net of tax, related to an incremental accrued rent adjustment calculated as a result of electing the hindsight practical expedient.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

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EASTERN BANK CORPORATION

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020     2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Operating activities

    

Net income

   $ 38,295     $ 68,018  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities

    

Provision for loan losses

     37,200       4,500  

Depreciation and amortization

     8,471       9,781  

Change in unamortized net loan costs and premiums

     (3,155     2,501  

Deferred income tax expense (benefit)

     1,773       6,052  

Amortization of investment security premiums and discounts

     1,656       1,502  

Right-of-use asset amortization

     6,042       —    

Increase in cash surrender value of bank-owned life insurance

     (1,155     (1,092

Gain on life insurance benefits

     (147     —    

Net gain on sale of securities available for sale

     (285     (2,016

Net gain on sale of mortgage loans held for sale

     (1,513     (209

Mark-to-market on loans held for sale

     19       —    

Proceeds from sale of loans held for sale

     172,872       53,104  

Originations of loans held for sale

     (174,324     (54,857

Amortization of gains from terminated interest rate swaps

     (373     —    

Loss on sale of premises and equipment

     —         131  

Change in:

    

Trading securities

     961       51,444  

Prepaid pension expense

     (28,432     (15,515

Other assets

     (133,413     (30,070

Other liabilities

     77,509       (8,620
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     2,001       84,654  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Investing activities

    

Proceeds from sales of securities available for sale

     9,098       47,986  

Proceeds from maturities and principal paydowns of securities available for sale

     153,542       85,226  

Purchases of securities available for sale

     (171,226     (35,981

Proceeds from sale of Federal Home Loan Bank stock

     749       31,862  

Purchases of Federal Home Loan Bank stock

     (527     (27,453

Contributions to low income housing tax credit investments

     (7,435     (946

Distributions from low income housing tax credit investments

     —         3  

Contributions to other equity investments

     (1,092     —    

Distributions from equity investments

     54       15  

Net increase in outstanding loans

     (997,881     (176,135

Purchased banking premises and equipment, net

     (2,146     (3,780
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (1,016,864     (79,203
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financing activities

    

Net increase in demand, savings, interest checking, and money market investment deposit accounts

     2,315,592       107,136  

Net decrease in time deposits

     (20,219     (65,525

Net decrease in borrowed funds

     (206,240     (14,714

 

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Contingent consideration paid

     (158     (447

Payment of initial public offering costs

     (4,153     —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

     2,084,822       26,450  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net increase in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash

     1,069,959       31,901  

Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash at beginning of period

     362,602       259,708  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash at end of period

   $ 1,432,561     $ 291,609  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information

    

Cash paid during the period for:

    

Interest paid

   $ 10,533     $ 17,697  

Income taxes

     14,976       20,335  

Non-cash activities

    

Net increase in capital commitments relating to low income housing tax credit projects

   $ 13,214     $ —    

Initial recognition of operating lease right-of-use assets upon adoption of Accounting Standards Update 2016-02

     92,948       —    

Initial recognition of operating lease liabilities upon adoption of Accounting Standards Update 2016-02

     96,426       —    

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

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EASTERN BANK CORPORATION

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. Nature of the Business and Basis of Presentation

Nature of Operations

Eastern Bank Corporation (the “Company”) is a Massachusetts-chartered mutual bank holding company. Through its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Eastern Bank (the “Bank”) and Eastern Insurance Group LLC, the Company provides a variety of banking, trust and investment services, and insurance services, through its full-service bank branches and insurance offices, located primarily in Eastern Massachusetts, southern and coastal New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

The activities of the Company are subject to the regulatory supervision of the Federal Reserve Board. The activities of the Bank are subject to the regulatory supervision of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”). The Company and the activities of the Bank are also subject to various Massachusetts and New Hampshire business and banking regulations.

Basis of Presentation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company, its wholly-owned subsidiaries and entities in which it holds a controlling financial interest through being the primary beneficiary or through holding a majority of the voting interest. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

The Company’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) as set forth by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) and its Accounting Standards Codification and Accounting Standards Update as well as the rules and interpretive releases of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) under the authority of federal securities laws.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Use of Estimates

In preparing the consolidated financial statements, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the date of the balance sheets and income and expenses for the periods reported. Actual results could differ from those estimates based on changing conditions, including economic conditions and future events. Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to change relate to the determination of the allowance for loan losses, valuation and fair value measurements, other-than-temporary impairment on investment securities, the liabilities for benefit obligations (particularly pensions), the provision for income taxes and impairment of goodwill and other intangibles.

Unaudited Interim Financial Information

The accompanying consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2020, the consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income, of changes in equity and of cash flows for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 are unaudited. The consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2019 was derived from the audited consolidated financial statements as of that date. The interim consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes should be read in conjunction with the annual consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes contained within the Company’s prospectus, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3) on August 18, 2020. In the opinion of management, the Company’s consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair statement of the results of operations for the periods presented. The results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the year ending December 31, 2020, any other interim periods, or any future year or period.

Leases

On January 1, 2020, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (‘ASU”) 2016-02, “Leases” (“Topic 842”), using the modified retrospective method. The new guidance was applied to leases that existed or were entered into on or after January 1, 2020. The Company’s results for the reporting period beginning on January 1, 2020 have been presented under Topic 842, while prior period amounts have not been adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with previous guidance. See “Note 5 – Leases” for further discussion of the adoption and the impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

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Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Relevant standards that were recently issued but not yet adopted as of June 30, 2020:

In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-4, Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848). This update addresses optional expedients and exceptions for applying GAAP to certain contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions affected by reference rate reform if certain criteria are met. The new guidance applies only to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions that reference the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or another reference rate expected to be discontinued because of reference rate reform. The expedients and exceptions provided by the amendments do not apply to contract modifications made and hedging relationships existing as of December 31, 2022, that an entity has elected certain optional expedients for and that are retained through the end of the hedging relationship. For public and nonpublic entities, the guidance is effective as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022 and do not apply to contract modifications made after December 31, 2022. The Company qualifies as an emerging growth company (“EGC”) under the Jumpstart Our Business Act of 2012 and has elected to defer the adoption of new or revised accounting standards until the nonpublic company effective dates. As such, the Company will adopt this standard on the nonpublic company effective date and is currently in the process of reviewing its contracts and existing processes in order to assess the risks and potential impact of the transition away from LIBOR.

In June 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments–Credit Losses on Financial Instruments and relevant amendments (Topic 326) (“ASU 2016-13”). This update was created to replace the current GAAP method of calculating credit losses Specifically, the standard replaces the existing incurred loss impairment guidance by requiring immediate recognition of expected credit losses. For financial assets carried at amortized cost that are held at the reporting date (including trade and other receivables, loans and commitments, held-to-maturity debt securities and other financial assets). Credit losses are measured based on historical experience, current conditions and reasonable supportable forecasts. The standard also amends existing impairment guidance for available for sale securities, in which credit losses will be recorded as an allowance versus a write-down of the amortized cost basis of the security. It will also allow for a reversal of impairment loss when the credit of the issuer improves. The guidance requires a cumulative effect of the initial application to be recognized in retained earnings at the date of initial application.

In November 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-19, Codification Improvements to Topic 326, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses. The amendments in Update No. 2018-19 was intended to clarify that receivables arising from operating leases are not within the scope of Subtopic 326-20. Instead, impairment of receivables arising from operating leases should be accounted for in accordance with Topic 842, Leases. In November 2019, FASB issued ASU 2019-11, Codification Improvements to Topic 326, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses. This update requires entities to include expected recoveries of the amortized cost basis previously written off or expected to be written off in the valuation account for purchased financial assets with credit deterioration. In addition, the amendments in this update clarify and improve various aspects of the guidance for ASU 2016-13.

For public entities that meet the definition of an SEC filer (excluding smaller reporting entities) the guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for all entities as of the fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. For all other entities, the guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods within those fiscal years.

The Company, which currently qualifies as an EGC, anticipates to early adopt this standard during the year ending on December 31, 2021 and is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements. To date, the Company has been assessing the key differences and gaps between its current allowance methodology and model and those it is considering using upon adoption. The Company has contracted with a vendor and is currently assessing the adequacy of existing loss data and developing models for default and loss estimates. While currently unable to reasonably estimate the impact of adopting this ASU, it is expected that the impact of adoption will be influenced by the composition, characteristics and quality of the loan and securities portfolios as well as the prevailing economic conditions and forecasts as of the adoption date.

 

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Relevant standards that were adopted during the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020:

In accordance with the nonpublic company requirements, the Company adopted ASC 606 on January 1, 2019. In completing its assessment of the Company’s revenue streams within the scope of ASC 606, the Company did not identify any revenue sources for which the timing of recognition needed to change under the new standard. The adoption of this standard on January 1, 2019 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements, its current accounting policies and practices, or the timing or amount of revenue recognized. As a result, no adjustment has been made to retained earnings. Additionally, the Company evaluated and made necessary changes, where appropriate, to business processes, systems, and internal controls in order to support the recognition, measurement, and disclosure requirements of the new standard. The Company also considered the impact of ASC 606 subtopic ASC 340-40. Under ASC 340-40, the Company is required to capitalize and amortize incremental costs of obtaining a contract, such as sales commissions, over the period of benefit. The Company does not pay sales commissions and has not identified any other incremental cost to obtain a contract, therefore ASC 340-40 had no impact to its consolidated financial statements.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (“ASU 2016-02”). Topic 842 was subsequently amended by ASU 2018-01, Land Easement Practical Expedient for Transition to Topic 842 (“ASU 2018-01”); ASU 2018-10, Codification Improvements to Topic 842, Leases (“ASU 2018-10”); ASU 2018-11, Targeted Improvements (“ASU 2018-11”); and ASU 2018-20 Leases (Topic 842): Narrow-Scope Improvements for Lessors (“ASU 2018-20”). ASU 2018-01 permits an entity to elect an optional transition practical expedient to not evaluate under Topic 842 land easements that exist or expired before the entity’s adoption of Topic 842 and that were not previously accounted for as leases under Topic 840. ASU 2018-10 was issued to clarify the Codification or to correct unintended application of guidance within ASU 2016-02. ASU 2018-11 allows for an optional transition method in which the provisions of Topic 842 would be applied upon the adoption date and would not have to be retroactively applied to the earliest reporting period presented in the consolidated financial statements. Lastly, ASU 2018-20 provided narrow-scope improvements for lessors, which was issued to increase transparency and comparability among organizations. ASU 2016-02 and the several additional amendments thereto are collectively referred to herein as ASC 842.

ASC 842 sets out the principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases for both parties to a contract (i.e., lessees and lessors). The standard represents a wholesale change to lease accounting and requires all leases with a term longer than 12 months to be reported on the balance sheet through recognition of a right-of-use asset and a corresponding liability for future lease obligations. Leases will be classified as financing or operating, with classification affecting the pattern and grouping of expenses in the income statement. The standard also requires extensive disclosures for assets, expenses, and cash flows associated with leases, as well as a maturity analysis of lease liabilities. In November 2019, FASB issued guidance delaying the effective date for all entities except for public business entities that are SEC filers. For public business entities the guidance is effective for fiscal year beginning after December 15, 2018, for all other entities the guidance is effective for fiscal year beginning after December 15, 2020, early adoption is permitted for all entities.

The Company early adopted this standard on January 1, 2020. In accordance with ASU 2018-11, the Company used the effective date as the date of application and, therefore, periods prior to January 1, 2020, were not restated. The new standard provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company elected the “package of practical expedients”, which permits the Company to not reassess prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification, and initial direct costs under ASC 842. The Company also elected the hindsight practical expedient and, therefore, used the hindsight knowledge as of the effective date when determining lease terms and impairment. In addition, the Company elected the practical expedient to not separate lease and non-lease components and, therefore, accounts for each separate lease component of a contract and its associated non-lease components as a single lease component. The new standard also provides a practical expedient for an entity’s ongoing accounting relating to leases of 12 months or less (“short-term leases”). The Company has elected the short-term lease recognition exemption for all leases that qualify and will not recognize right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for those leases. The adoption of this standard resulted in the recognition of right-of-use asset and lease liabilities on the Company’s balance sheet for its real estate and equipment operating leases of $92.9 million and $96.4 million, respectively. The Company recorded an adjustment to remove the Company’s existing deferred rent liability of approximately $3.5 million. The Company also recognized a transition adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings on January 1, 2020 amounting to $1.1 million, net of tax, related to an incremental accrued rent adjustment calculated as a result of electing the hindsight practical expedient. The amount of right-of-use assets were determined based upon the present value of the remaining minimal rental payments under current leasing standards for existing operating leases, adjusted for options that the Company is reasonably certain to exercise, less accrued rent as of December 31, 2019 and the incremental accrued rent as a result of electing the hindsight practical expedient. Lastly, the amount of lease liabilities was determined based upon the present value of the remaining minimum rental payments under current leasing standards for existing operating leases, adjusted for options that the Company is reasonably certain to exercise.

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820) Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement (“ASU 2018-13”). This update modifies the disclosure requirements related to the fair value measurements in Topic 820. Specifically, this update amends disclosure around changes in unrealized gains and losses, the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used in Level 3 fair value measurements and the description of measurement uncertainty. The Company adopted ASU 2018-13 on January 1, 2020. This update did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

 

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In October 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-16, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Inclusion of the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) Overnight Index Swap (OIS) Rate as a Benchmark Interest Rate for Hedge Accounting Purposes (“ASU 2018-16”). This update permits the use of the Overnight Index Swap (“OIS”) rate based on the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as a U.S. benchmark interest rate for hedge accounting purposes under Topic 815. The amendments should be adopted on a prospective basis for qualifying new or re-structured hedging relationships entered into on or after the date of adoption. The Company adopted this standard on January 1, 2020. This update did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements

3. Securities

Trading Securities

The Company had trading securities of $0 and $1.0 million as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. The reduction in the Company’s trading portfolio was due to the Company’s exit of its capital markets business during the year ended December 31, 2019.

Available for Sale Securities

The amortized cost, gross unrealized gains and losses, and fair value of available for sale securities for the periods below were as follows:

 

     As of and for the six months ended June 30, 2020  
     Amortized
Cost
     Unrealized
Gains
     Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 
     (In Thousands)  

Debt securities:

           

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

   $ 1,207,274      $ 44,750      $ (225    $ 1,251,799  

U.S. Treasury securities

     60,189        747        —          60,936  

State and municipal bonds and obligations

     264,615        16,725        —          281,340  

Qualified zone academy bond

     6,209        70        —          6,279  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,538,287      $ 62,292      $ (225    $ 1,600,354  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     As of and for the year ended December 31, 2019  
     Amortized
Cost
     Unrealized
Gains
     Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 
     (In Thousands)  

Debt securities:

           

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

   $ 1,151,305      $ 17,208      $ (545    $ 1,167,968  

U.S. Treasury securities

     50,155        265        —          50,420  

State and municipal bonds and obligations

     272,582        10,959        (3      283,538  

Qualified zone academy bond

     6,155        155        —          6,310  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,480,197      $ 28,587      $ (548    $ 1,508,236  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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The amortized cost and estimated fair value of available for sale securities by contractual maturities as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 are shown below. Actual maturities may differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without prepayment penalties. The scheduled contractual maturities of available for sale securities as of the dates indicated were as follows:

 

    As of June 30, 2020  
    Due in one year or less     Due after one year to five years     Due after five to ten years     Due after ten years     Total  
    Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value  
    (In Thousands)  

Available for sale securities:

                   

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

  $ —       $ —       $ 24,413     $ 25,733     $ 150,726     $ 157,290     $ 1,032,135     $ 1,068,776     $ 1,207,274     $ 1,251,799  

U.S. Treasury securities

    50,070       50,778       10,119       10,158       —         —         —         —         60,189       60,936  

State and municipal bonds and obligations

    407       411       18,205       18,966       73,890       77,868       172,113       184,095       264,615       281,340  

Qualified zone academy bond

    6,209       6,279       —         —         —         —         —         —         6,209       6,279  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total available for sale securities

  $ 56,686     $ 57,468     $ 52,737     $ 54,857     $ 224,616     $ 235,158     $ 1,204,248     $ 1,252,871     $ 1,538,287     $ 1,600,354  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    As of December 31, 2019  
    Due in one year or less     Due after one year to five years     Due after five to ten years     Due after ten years     Total  
    Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value     Amortized     Fair Value  
    (In Thousands)  

Available for sale securities:

                   

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

  $ —       $ —       $ 8,139     $ 8,464     $ 199,428     $ 203,706     $ 943,738     $ 955,798     $ 1,151,305     $ 1,167,968  

U.S. Treasury securities

    40       40       50,115       50,380       —         —         —         —         50,155       50,420  

State and municipal bonds and obligations

    381       381       8,889       9,109       77,227       79,504       186,085       194,544       272,582       283,538  

Qualified zone academy bond

    6,155       6,310       —         —         —         —         —         —         6,155       6,310  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total available for sale securities

  $ 6,576     $ 6,731     $ 67,143     $ 67,953     $ 276,655     $ 283,210     $ 1,129,823     $ 1,150,342     $ 1,480,197     $ 1,508,236  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross realized gains from sales of available for sale securities were $0.2 million and $2.0 million during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, and $0.3 million and $2.1 million during the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The Company had no significant gross realized losses from sales of securities available for sale during both the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019. No other-than-temporary impairment was recorded during the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019.

Management prepares an estimate of the expected cash flows for investment securities available for sale that potentially may be deemed to have OTTI. This estimate begins with the contractual cash flows of the security. This amount is then reduced by an estimate of probable credit losses associated with the security. When estimating the extent of probable losses on the securities, management considers the credit quality and the ability to pay of the underlying issuers. Indicators of diminished credit quality of the issuers include defaults, interest deferrals, or “payments in kind.” Management also considers those factors listed in the Investments – Debt and Equity Securities topic of the FASB ASC when estimating the ultimate realizability of the cash flows for each individual security.

The resulting estimate of cash flows after considering credit is then subject to a present value computation using a discount rate equal to the current yield used to accrete the beneficial interest or the effective interest rate implicit in the security at the date of acquisition. If the present value of the estimated cash flows is less than the current amortized cost basis, an OTTI is considered to have occurred and the security is written down to the fair value indicated by the cash flow analysis. As part of the analysis, management considers whether it intends to sell the security or whether it is more than likely that it would be required to sell the security before the expected recovery of its amortized cost basis.

 

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Information pertaining to available for sale securities with gross unrealized losses as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, which the Company has not deemed to be OTTI, aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous loss position, follows:

 

     June 30, 2020  
            Less than 12 Months      12 Months or Longer      Total  
     # of
Holdings
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

     1        225        100,685        —          —          225        100,685  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     1      $ 225      $ 100,685      $ —        $ —        $ 225      $ 100,685  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     December 31, 2019  
            Less than 12 Months      12 Months or Longer      Total  
     # of
Holdings
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

     1      $ 545      $ 74,550      $ —        $ —        $ 545      $ 74,550  

State and municipal bonds and obligations

     2        3        850        —          —          3        850  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     3      $ 548      $ 75,400      $ —        $ —        $ 548      $ 75,400  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company does not intend to sell these investments and has determined based upon available evidence that it is more likely than not that the Company will not be required to sell each security before the expected recovery of its amortized cost basis. As a result, the Company does not consider these investments to be OTTI. The Company made this determination by reviewing various qualitative and quantitative factors regarding each investment category, such as current market conditions, extent and nature of changes in fair value, issuer rating changes and trends, and volatility of earnings.

As a result of the Company’s review of these qualitative and quantitative factors, the causes of the impairments listed in the tables above by category are as follows as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019:

 

   

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities - The securities with unrealized losses in this portfolio have contractual terms that generally do not permit the issuer to settle the security at a price less than the current par value of the investment. The decline in market value of these securities is attributable to changes in interest rates and not credit quality. The security at a loss position as of December 31, 2019 was subsequently in a gain position as of June 30, 2020. Additionally, these securities are implicitly guaranteed by the U.S. Government or one of its agencies.

 

   

State and municipal bonds and obligations - The securities with unrealized losses in this portfolio as of December 31, 2019 have contractual terms that generally do not permit the issuer to settle the securities at a price less than the current par value of the investment. The decline in market value of these securities as of December 31, 2019 is attributable to changes in interest rates and not credit quality. These securities were subsequently in a gain position as of June 30, 2020. These bonds are investment grade and are rated AA Standard and Poor’s.

4. Loans and Allowance for Loan Losses

The following table provides a summary of the Company’s loan portfolio as of the dates indicated:

 

     At June 30,      At December 31,  
     2020      2019  
     (In thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

   $ 2,271,700      $ 1,642,184  

Commercial real estate

     3,584,358        3,535,441  

Commercial construction

     282,246        273,774  

Business banking

     1,234,961        771,498  

Residential real estate

     1,400,855        1,428,630  

Consumer home equity

     905,484        933,088  

Other consumer

     334,734        402,431  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gross loans before unamortized premiums, unearned discounts and deferred fees

     10,014,338        8,987,046  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Allowance for credit losses

     (116,636      (82,297

Unamortized premiums, net of unearned discounts and deferred fees

     (34,722      (5,565
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loans after the allowance for credit losses, unamortized premiums, unearned discounts and deferred fees

   $ 9,862,980      $ 8,899,184  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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There are no other loan categories that exceed 10% of total loans not already reflected in the preceding table.

The Company’s lending activities are conducted principally in the New England area with the exception of its Shared National Credit Program (“SNC Program”) portfolio. The Company participates in the SNC Program in an effort to improve industry and geographical diversification. The SNC Program portfolio is included in the Company’s commercial and industrial, commercial real estate and commercial construction portfolios. The SNC Program portfolio is defined as loan syndications with exposure over $100 million and with three or more lenders participating.

Most loans originated by the Company are either collateralized by real estate or other assets or guaranteed by federal and local governmental authorities. The ability and willingness of the single-family residential and consumer borrowers to honor their repayment commitments is generally dependent on the level of overall economic activity within the borrowers’ geographic areas and real estate values. The ability and willingness of commercial real estate, commercial and industrial, and construction loan borrowers to honor their repayment commitments is generally dependent on the health of the real estate economy in the borrowers’ geographic areas and the general economy. The ability and willingness of airplane loan borrowers to repay is generally dependent on the health of the general economy.

Loans Pledged as Collateral

The carrying value of loans pledged to secure advances from the FHLB were $2.1 billion and $1.5 billion at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 3019, mortgage loans partially or wholly-owned by others and serviced by the Company amounted to approximately $14.9 million and $15.6 million, respectively.

Allowance for Loan Losses

The allowance for loan losses is established to provide for probable losses incurred in the Company’s loan portfolio at the balance sheet date and is established through a provision for loan losses charged to net income. Charge-offs, net of recoveries, are charged directly to the allowance. Commercial and residential loans are charged-off in the period in which they are deemed uncollectible. Delinquent loans in these product types are subject to ongoing review and analysis to determine if a charge-off in the current period is appropriate. For consumer loans, policies and procedures exist that require charge-off consideration upon a certain triggering event depending on the product type.

The following table summarizes the changes in the allowance for loan losses for the periods indicated:

 

     For the Three Months Ended
June 30,
     For the Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2020      2019      2020      2019  
    

(In thousands)

 

Balance at the beginning of period

   $ 109,138      $ 82,493      $ 82,297      $ 80,655  

Loans charged off

     (1,264      (2,563      (3,607      (4,487

Recoveries

     162        1,232        746        1,994  

Provision charged to expense

     8,600        1,500        37,200        4,500  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at end of period

   $ 116,636      $ 82,662      $ 116,636      $ 82,662  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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The following tables summarize changes in the allowance for loan losses by loan category and bifurcates the amount of allowance allocated to each loan category based on collective impairment analysis and loans evaluated individually for impairment:

 

     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2020  
     Commercial
and
Industrial
    Commercial
Real Estate
    Commercial
Construction
     Business
Banking
    Residential
Real
Estate
    Consumer
Home
Equity
    Other
Consumer
    Other     Total  
     (In Thousands)  

Allowance for Loan Losses:

                   

Beginning balance

   $ 30,531     $ 49,227     $ 4,712      $ 10,181     $ 6,228     $ 3,913     $ 4,019     $ 327     $ 109,138  

Charge-offs

     (27     (24     —          (1,198     —         —         (15     —         (1,264

Recoveries

     58       5       —          27       13       8       51       —         162  

Provision (benefit)

     2,667       5,020       104        795       328       (46     (293     25       8,600  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 33,229     $ 54,228     $ 4,816      $ 9,805     $ 6,569     $ 3,875     $ 3,762     $ 352     $ 116,636  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2019  
     Commercial
and
Industrial
    Commercial
Real Estate
    Commercial
Construction
     Business
Banking
    Residential
Real
Estate
    Consumer
Home
Equity
    Other
Consumer
    Other     Total  
     (In Thousands)  

Allowance for Loan Losses:

                   

Beginning balance

   $ 20,844     $ 33,170     $ 4,225      $ 8,175     $ 7,169     $ 4,105     $ 4,390     $ 415     $ 82,493  

Charge-offs

     (272     (169     —          (1,371     (46     (124     (581     —         (2,563

Recoveries

     908       2       —          193       12       20       97       —         1,232  

Provision (benefit)

     (651     583       537        1,057       (335     96       418       (205     1,500  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 20,829     $ 33,586     $ 4,762      $ 8,054     $ 6,800     $ 4,097     $ 4,324     $ 210     $ 82,662  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     For the Six Months Ended June, 2020  
     Commercial
and
Industrial
    Commercial
Real Estate
    Commercial
Construction
     Business
Banking
    Residential
Real Estate
     Consumer
Home Equity
    Other
Consumer
    Other     Total  
     (In thousands)  

Allowance for loan losses:

                    

Beginning balance

   $ 20,919     $ 34,730     $ 3,424      $ 8,260     $ 6,380      $ 4,027     $ 4,173     $ 384     $ 82,297  

Charge-offs

     (27     (24     —          (2,535     —          (473     (548     —         (3,607

Recoveries

     380       6       —          154       73        22       111       —         746  

Provision (benefit)

     11,957       19,516       1,392        3,926       116        299       26       (32     37,200  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 33,229     $ 54,228     $ 4,816      $ 9,805     $ 6,569      $ 3,875     $ 3,762     $ 352     $ 116,636  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 3,028     $ 230     $ 22      $ 578     $ 1,639      $ 277     $ —       $ —       $ 5,774  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: acquired with deteriorated credit quality

   $ 1,732     $ 1,066     $ —        $ —       $ 293      $ —       $ —       $ —       $ 3,091  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: collectively evaluated for impairment

   $ 28,469     $ 52,932     $ 4,794      $ 9,227     $ 4,637      $ 3,598     $ 3,762     $ 352     $ 107,771  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans ending balance:

                    

Individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 18,864     $ 4,920     $ 280      $ 20,301     $ 28,301      $ 5,947     $ 22     $ —       $ 78,635  

Acquired with deteriorated credit quality

     3,572       5,413       —          —         3,426        —         —         —         12,411  

Collectively evaluated for impairment

     2,249,264       3,574,025       281,966        1,214,660       1,369,128        899,537       334,712       —         9,923,292  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans by group

   $ 2,271,700     $ 3,584,358     $ 282,246      $ 1,234,961     $ 1,400,855      $ 905,484     $ 334,734     $ —       $ 10,014,338  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
     For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2019  
     Commercial
and
Industrial
    Commercial
Real Estate
    Commercial
Construction
     Business
Banking
    Residential
Real Estate
    Consumer
Home Equity
    Other
Consumer
    Other     Total  
     (In thousands)  

Allowance for loan losses:

                   

Beginning balance

   $ 19,321     $ 32,400     $ 4,606      $ 8,167     $ 7,059     $ 4,113     $ 4,600     $ 389     $ 80,655  

Charge-offs

     (272     (169     —          (2,810     (63     (124     (1,049     —         (4,487

Recoveries

     1,368       4       —          320       71       28       203       —         1,994  

Provision (benefit)

     412       1,351       156        2,377       (267     80       570       (179     4,500  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 20,829     $ 33,586       4,762      $ 8,054     $ 6,800     $ 4,097     $ 4,324     $ 210     $ 82,662  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 1,918     $ 40     $ —        $ 198     $ 1,663     $ 296     $ —       $ —       $ 4,115  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: acquired with deteriorated credit quality

   $ 227     $ 85     $ —        $ —       $ 213     $ —       $ —       $ —       $ 525  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: collectively evaluated for impairment

   $ 18,684     $ 33,461     $ 4,762      $ 7,856     $ 4,924     $ 3,801     $ 4,324     $ 210     $ 78,022  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans ending balance:

                   

Individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 21,098     $ 10,421     $ —        $ 9,043     $ 27,287     $ 4,642     $ —       $ —       $ 72,491  

Acquired with deteriorated credit quality

     4,109       7,591       —          —         3,405       —         —         —         15,105  

Collectively evaluated for impairment

     1,726,510       3,331,951       310,860        736,417       1,414,741       950,713       470,858       —         8,942,050  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans by group

   $ 1,751,717     $ 3,349,963     $ 310,860      $ 745,460     $ 1,445,433     $ 955,355     $ 470,858     $ —       $ 9,029,646  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Management uses a methodology to systematically estimate the amount of loss incurred in the portfolio. Commercial real estate, commercial and industrial, commercial construction and business banking loans are evaluated using a loan rating system, historical losses and other factors which form the basis for estimating incurred losses. Portfolios of more homogeneous populations of loans, including residential mortgages and consumer loans, are analyzed as groups taking into account delinquency ratios, historical loss experience and charge-offs. For the purpose of estimating the allowance for loan losses, management segregates the loan portfolio into the categories noted in the above tables. Each of these loan categories possess unique risk characteristics such as the purpose of the loan, repayment source, and collateral. These characteristics are considered when determining the appropriate level of the allowance for each category. Some examples of these risk characteristics unique to each loan category include:

Commercial Lending

Commercial and industrial: The primary risk associated with commercial and industrial loans is the ability of borrowers to achieve business results consistent with those projected at origination. Collateral frequently consists of a first lien position on business assets including, but not limited to accounts receivable, inventory, airplanes and equipment. The primary repayment source is operating cash flow and, secondarily, the liquidation of assets. The Company often obtains personal guarantees from individuals holding material ownership in the borrowing entity.

 

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Table of Contents

Commercial real estate: Collateral values are established by independent third-party appraisals and evaluations. Primary repayment sources include operating income generated by the real estate, permanent debt refinancing, sale of the real estate and, secondarily, by liquidation of the collateral. The Company often obtains personal guarantees from individuals holding material ownership in the borrowing equity.

Commercial construction: These loans are generally considered to present a higher degree of risk than other real estate loans and may be affected by a variety of factors, such as adverse changes in interest rates and the borrower’s ability to control costs and adhere to time schedules. Construction loans are underwritten utilizing feasibility studies, independent appraisal reviews, sensitivity analysis of absorption and lease rates and financial analysis of the developers and property owners. Construction loans are generally based upon estimates of costs and value associated with the completed project. Construction loan repayment is substantially dependent on the ability of the borrower to complete the project and obtain permanent financing.

Business banking: These loans are typically secured by all business assets or commercial real estate. Business banking originations include traditionally underwritten loans as well as partially automated scored loans. Business banking scored loans are determined by utilizing the Company’s proprietary decision matrix that has a number of quantitative factors including, but not limited to, a guarantor’s credit score, industry risk, and time in business. The Company also engages in Small Business Association (“SBA”) lending, both in the business banking and commercial banking divisions. The SBA guarantees reduce the Company’s loss due to default and are considered a credit enhancement to the loan structure.

Residential Lending

Residential real estate: These loans are made to borrowers who demonstrate the ability to repay principal and interest on a monthly basis. Underwriting considerations include, among others, income sources and their reliability, willingness to repay as evidenced by credit repayment history, financial resources (including cash reserves) and the value of the collateral. The Company maintains policy standards for minimum credit score and cash reserves and maximum loan to value consistent with a “prime” portfolio. Collateral consists of mortgage liens on 1-4 family residential dwellings. The Company does not originate or purchase sub-prime or other high-risk loans. Residential loans are originated either for sale to investors or retained in the Company’s loan portfolio. Decisions about whether to sell or retain residential loans are made based on the interest rate characteristics, pricing for loans in the secondary mortgage market, competitive factors and the Company’s capital needs.

Consumer Lending

Consumer home equity: Home equity lines of credit are granted for ten years with monthly interest-only repayment requirements. Full principal repayment is required at the end of the ten-year draw period. Home equity loans are term loans that require the monthly payment of principal and interest such that the loan will be fully amortized at maturity. Underwriting considerations are materially consistent with those utilized in residential real estate. Collateral consists of a senior or subordinate lien on owner-occupied residential property.

Other consumer: The Company’s policy and underwriting in this category, which is comprised primarily of airplane and automobile loans, include the following factors, among others: income sources and reliability, credit histories, term of repayment, and collateral value, as applicable. These are typically granted on an unsecured basis, with the exception of airplane and automobile loans.

Credit Quality

Commercial Lending Credit Quality

The Company monitors credit quality indicators and utilizes portfolio scorecards to assess the risk of its commercial portfolio. Specifically, the Company utilizes a 12-point credit risk-rating system to manage risk and identify potential problem loans. Risk-rating assignments are based upon a number of quantitative and qualitative factors that are under continual review. Factors include cash flow, collateral coverage, liquidity, leverage, position within the industry, internal controls and management, financial reporting, and other considerations. The risk-rating categories are defined as follows:

0 Risk Rating - Unrated

Certain segments of the portfolios are not rated. These segments include airplane loans, business banking scored loan products, and other commercial loans managed by exception. Loans within this unrated loan segment are monitored by delinquency status; and for lines of credit greater than $100,000 in exposure, an annual review is conducted. The Company supplements performance data with current credit scores for the business banking portfolio on a quarterly basis. Unrated loans managed outside of airplane loans and business banking loans are generally restricted to commercial exposure less than $1 million with a line of credit component restricted

 

19


Table of Contents

to $350,000. Loans included in this category have qualification requirements that include risk rating of 6W or better at time of recommendation for unrated status, acceptable management of deposit accounts, and no known negative changes in management, operations or financial performance. Restricted from this category are lines of credit managed with borrowing base requirements.

For purposes of estimating the allowance for loan losses, unrated loans are considered in the same manner as pass rated loans.

1-6W Risk Rating – Pass

Loans with a risk-rating of 1-6W are classified as “Pass” and are comprised of loans that range from “substantially risk free” which indicates borrowers of unquestioned credit standing, well-established national companies with a very strong financial condition, and loans fully secured by cash, through “acceptable risk” which indicates acceptable rated loans that may be experiencing weak cash flow, impending lease rollover or minor liquidity concerns. The top end of the risk-rating category (6W) includes loans that, although contain the same risk-rating as those with a rating of 6, are being more closely monitored to determine if a downgrade is necessary.

7 Risk Rating – Special Mention (Potential Weakness)

Loans to borrowers in this category exhibit potential weaknesses or downward trends deserving management’s close attention. While potentially weak, no loss of principal or interest is envisioned. Included in this category are borrowers who are performing as agreed, are weak when compared to industry standards, may be experiencing an interim loss and may be in declining industries. An element of asset quality, financial flexibility or management is below average. Management and owners may have limited depth, particularly when operating under strained circumstances. The Company does not consider borrowers within this category as new business prospects. Borrowers rated special mention may find it difficult to obtain alternative financing from traditional bank sources.

8 Risk Rating – Substandard (Well-Defined Weakness)

Loans with a risk-rating of 8 exhibit well-defined weaknesses that, if not corrected, may jeopardize the orderly liquidation of the debt. A loan is classified as substandard if it is inadequately protected by the repayment capacity of the obligor or by the collateral pledged. Specifically, repayment under market rates and terms, or by the requirements under the existing loan documents, is in jeopardy, but no loss of principal or interest is envisioned. There is a possibility that a partial loss of principal and/or interest will occur in the future if the deficiencies are not corrected. Loss potential, while existing in the aggregate portfolio of substandard assets, does not have to exist in individual assets classified as substandard. Credits in this category often may have reported a loss in the most recent fiscal year end and are likely to continue to report losses in the interim period, or interim losses are expected to result in a fiscal year-end loss. Nonaccrual is possible, but not mandatory, in this class.

9 Risk Rating – Doubtful (Loss Probably)

Loans classified as doubtful have comparable weaknesses as found in the loans classified as substandard with the added provision that such weaknesses make collection of the debt in full (based on currently existing facts, conditions and values) highly questionable and improbable. Serious problems exist such that partial loss of principal is likely. The probability of loss exceeds 50%, however, because of reasonably specific pending factors that may work to strengthen the credit, estimated losses are deferred until a more exact status can be determined. Pending factors may include the sale of the company, a merger, capital injection, new profitable purchase orders, and refinancing plans. Specific reserves will be the amount identified after specific review. Nonaccrual is mandatory in this class.

10 Risk Rating – Loss

Loans to borrowers in this category are deemed incapable of repayment. Loans to such borrowers are considered uncollectable and of such little value that continuance as active assets of the Company is not warranted. This classification does not mean that the loans have no recovery or salvage value, but rather, it is not practical or desirable to defer writing off these assets even though partial recovery may occur in the future. Loans in this category have a recorded investment of $0 at the time of the downgrade.

The credit quality of the commercial loan portfolio is actively monitored and supported by a comprehensive credit approval process; and all large dollar transactions are sent for approval to a committee of seasoned business line and credit professionals. Risk ratings are periodically reviewed and the Company maintains an independent credit risk review function that reports directly to the Risk Management Committee of the Board of Directors. Credits that demonstrate significant deterioration in credit quality are transferred to a specialized group of seasoned workout officers for individual attention.

 

20


Table of Contents

The following table details the internal risk-rating categories for the Company’s commercial and industrial, commercial real estate, commercial construction and business banking portfolios:

 

            As of June 30, 2020  

Category

   Risk
Rating
     Commercial and
Industrial
     Commercial
Real Estate
     Commercial
Construction
     Business
Banking
     Total  
     (In thousands)  

Unrated

     0      $ 753,943      $ 42,919      $ 332      $ 900,296      $ 1,697,490  

Pass

     1-6W        1,269,284        3,211,054        248,400        291,751        5,020,489  

Special mention

     7        180,485        297,016        29,671        32,406        539,578  

Substandard

     8        51,338        30,654        3,843        10,508        96,343  

Doubtful

     9        16,650        2,715        —          —          19,365  

Loss

     10        —          —          —          —          —    
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

      $ 2,271,700      $ 3,584,358      $ 282,246      $ 1,234,961      $ 7,373,265  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
            As of December 31, 2019  

Category

   Risk
Rating
     Commercial and
Industrial
     Commercial
Real Estate
     Commercial
Construction
     Business
Banking
     Total  
     (In thousands)  

Unrated

     0      $ 150,226      $ 48,266      $ 331      $ 445,201      $ 644,024  

Pass

     1-6W        1,405,902        3,436,267        260,615        315,194        5,417,978  

Special mention

     7        24,171        28,606        9,438        2,006        64,221  

Substandard

     8        42,894        21,635        3,390        8,207        76,126  

Doubtful

     9        18,991        667        —          890        20,548  

Loss

     10        —          —          —          —          —    
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

      $ 1,642,184      $ 3,535,441      $ 273,774      $ 771,498      $ 6,222,897  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans are included within the unrated category of the commercial and industrial and business banking portfolios in the table above. Commercial and industrial and business banking PPP loans amounted to $633.0 million and $467.2 million, respectively, at June 30, 2020. The Company does not have an allowance for loan losses for PPP loans as they are 100% guaranteed by the SBA.

Residential and Consumer Lending Credit Quality

For the Company’s residential and consumer portfolios, the quality of the loan is best indicated by the repayment performance of an individual borrower. Updated appraisals, broker opinions of value and other collateral valuation methods are employed in the residential and consumer portfolios, typically for credits that are deteriorating. Delinquency status is determined using payment performance, while accrual status may be determined using a combination of payment performance, expected borrower viability and collateral value. Delinquent consumer loans are handled by a team of seasoned collection specialists.

Asset Quality

The Company manages its loan portfolio with careful monitoring. As a general rule, loans more than 90 days past due with respect to principal and interest are classified as nonaccrual loans. Exceptions may be made if management believes that collateral held by the Company is clearly sufficient and in full satisfaction of both principal and interest, or the loan is accounted for as a PCI loan. Therefore, as permitted by banking regulations, certain consumer loans past due 90 days or more may continue to accrue interest. The Company may also use discretion regarding other loans over 90 days delinquent if the loan is well secured and in the process of collection. Nonaccrual loans and loans that are more than 90 days past due but still accruing interest are considered nonperforming loans.

 

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Table of Contents

Nonaccrual loans may be returned to an accrual status when principal and interest payments are no longer delinquent, and the risk characteristics of the loan have improved to the extent that there no longer exists a concern as to the collectability of principal and interest. Loans are considered past due based upon the number of days delinquent according to their contractual terms. Specifically, nonaccrual residential loans that have been restructured must perform for a period of six months before being considered for accrual status.

A loan is expected to remain on nonaccrual status until it becomes current with respect to principal and interest, the loan is liquidated, or the loan is determined to be uncollectible and is charged-off against the allowance for loan losses.

The following is a summary pertaining to the breakdown of the Company’s nonaccrual loans:

 

     As of June 30,      As of December 31,  
     2020      2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

   $ 13,435      $ 21,471  

Commercial real estate

     1,399        4,120  

Commercial construction

     281        —    

Business banking

     16,158        8,502  

Residential real estate

     11,693        5,598  

Consumer home equity

     6,403        2,137  

Other consumer

     2,971        623  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total non-accrual loans

   $ 52,340      $ 42,451  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table shows the age analysis of past due loans as of the dates indicated:

 

     As of June 30, 2020  
     30-59
Days Past
Due
     60-89
Days Past
Due
     90 or More
Days Past
Due
     Total Past
Due
     Current      Total
Loans
     Recorded
Investment
> 90 Days

and Accruing
 
     (In thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

   $ 681      $ 671      $ 1,508      $ 2,860      $ 2,268,840      $ 2,271,700      $  471  

Commercial real estate

     —          257        3,045        3,302        3,581,056        3,584,358        2,331  

Commercial construction

     —          —          280        280        281,966        282,246        —    

Business banking

     4,541        4,160        13,021        21,722        1,213,239        1,234,961        —    

Residential real estate

     26,859        2,084        8,981        37,924        1,362,931        1,400,855        244  

Consumer home equity

     3,413        1,971        4,511        9,895        895,589        905,484        9  

Other consumer

     2,992        1,734        2,971        7,697        327,037        334,734        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 38,486      $ 10,877      $ 34,317      $ 83,680      $ 9,930,658      $ 10,014,338      $ 3,055  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
     As of December 31, 2019  
     30-59
Days Past
Due
     60-89
Days Past
Due
     90 or More
Days Past
Due
     Total Past
Due
     Current      Total
Loans
     Recorded
Investment >90
Days

and Accruing
 
     (In thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

   $ 1,407      $ —        $ 963      $ 2,370      $ 1,639,814      $ 1,642,184      $ —    

Commercial real estate

     1,290        100        1,856        3,246        3,532,195        3,535,441        1,315  

Commercial Construction

     —          —          —             273,774        273,774        —    

Business banking

     3,031        763        6,095        9,889        761,609        771,498        —    

Residential real estate

     14,030        2,563        3,030        19,623        1,409,007        1,428,630        —    

Consumer home equity

     2,497        430        1,636        4,563        928,525        933,088        9  

Other consumer

     3,451        514        579        4,544        397,887        402,431        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 25,706      $ 4,370      $ 14,159      $ 44,235      $ 8,942,811      $ 8,987,046      $ 1,324  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

In the normal course of business, the Company may become aware of possible credit problems in which borrowers exhibit potential for the inability to comply with the contractual terms of their loans, but which currently do not yet meet the criteria for classification as nonperforming loans. However, based upon the Company’s past experiences, some of these loans with potential weaknesses will ultimately be restructured or placed in non-accrual status.

Troubled Debt Restructurings (“TDR”)

In cases where a borrower experiences financial difficulty and the Company makes certain concessionary modifications to contractual terms, the loan is classified as a troubled debt restructured loan. The objective is to aid in the resolution of nonperforming loans by modifying the contractual obligation to avoid the possibility of foreclosure.

All TDR loans are considered impaired and therefore are subject to a specific review for impairment loss. The amount of impairment loss, if any, is recorded as a specific loss allocation to each individual loan in the allowance for loan losses. Commercial loans and residential loans that have been classified as TDRs and which subsequently default are reviewed to determine if the loan should be deemed collateral dependent. In such an instance, any shortfall between the value of the collateral and the book value of the loan is determined by measuring the recorded investment in the loan against the fair value of the collateral less costs to sell.

The Company’s policy is to have any TDR loans which are on nonaccrual status prior to being modified remain on nonaccrual status for approximately six months subsequent to being modified before management considers its return to accrual status. If the TDR loan is on accrual status prior to being modified, it is reviewed to determine if the modified loan should remain on accrual status.

 

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Table of Contents

The following table shows the TDR loans on accrual and nonaccrual status as of the dates indicated:

 

     As of June 30, 2020  
     TDRs on Accrual Status      TDRs on Nonaccrual Status      Total TDRs  
            Balance of      Number of      Balance of      Number of      Balance of  
     Number of Loans      Loans      Loans      Loans      Loans      Loans  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

     2      $ 5,429        10      $ 11,259        12      $ 16,688  

Commercial real estate

     1        3,521        2        707        3        4,228  

Business banking

     5        4,143        2        224        7        4,367  

Residential real estate

     149        23,714        28        4,172        177        27,886  

Consumer home equity

     86        3,862        12        2,085        98        5,947  

Other consumer

     1        22        —          —          1        22  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     244      $ 40,691        54      $ 18,447        298      $ 59,138  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     As of December 31, 2019  
     TDRs on Accrual Status      TDRs on Nonaccrual Status      Total TDRs  
            Balance of      Number of      Balance of      Number of      Balance of  
     Number of Loans      Loans      Loans      Loans      Loans      Loans  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

     4      $ 10,899        14      $ 19,781        18      $ 30,680  

Commercial real estate

     1        3,520        3        3,338        4        6,858  

Business banking

     2        3,156        1        204        3        3,360  

Residential real estate

     152        25,093        27        3,977        179        29,070  

Consumer home equity

     89        5,955        5        600        94        6,555  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     248      $ 48,623        50      $ 27,900        298      $ 76,523  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The amount of specific reserve associated with the TDRs was $4.4 million and $3.2 million at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. During the six months ended June 30, 2020 and the year ended December 31, 2019, $0 and $0.3 million, respectively, in TDRs moved from nonaccrual to accrual. The amount of additional commitments to lend to borrowers who have been a party to a TDR was $0 and $2.5 million at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

 

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Table of Contents

The following table shows the modifications which occurred during the periods and the change in the recorded investment subsequent to the modifications occurring:

 

     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2020      For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2020  
     Number
of
Contracts
     Pre-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
     Post-
Modification
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment (1)
     Number
of
Contracts
     Pre-Modification
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
     Post-
Modification
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment (1)
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

     1      $ 141      $ 141        1      $ 141      $ 141  

Commercial real estate

     1        506        506        1        506        506  

Business banking

     4        1,165        1,165        4        1,165        1,165  

Residential real estate

     2        155        155        3        399        399  

Consumer home equity

     4        113        113        12        527        531  

Other consumer

     —          —          —          1        24        24  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     12      $ 2,080      $ 2,080        22      $ 2,762      $ 2,766  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2019      For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2019  
     Number
of
Contracts
     Pre-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
     Post-
Modification
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment (1)
     Number
of
Contracts
     Pre-Modification
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
     Post-
Modification
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment (1)
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

     5      $ 7,141      $ 7,441        7      $ 7,462      $ 7,762  

Commercial real estate

     2        3,277        3,277        2        3,277        3,277  

Residential real estate

     3        433        445        3        433        445  

Consumer home equity

     3        154        156        3        154        156  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     13      $ 11,005      $ 11,319        15      $ 11,326      $ 11,640  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

The post-modification balances represent the balance of the loan on the date of modification. These amounts may show an increase when modification includes capitalization of interest.

At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the outstanding recorded investment of loans that were new to TDR during the period were $2.7 million and $36.2 million, respectively.

The following table shows the Company’s post-modification balance of TDRs listed by type of modification during the periods indicated:

 

     For the Three Months Ended June 30,      For the Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020      2019      2020      2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Adjusted interest rate and extended maturity

   $ —        $ 668      $ —        $ 668  

Adjusted interest rate and principal deferred

     —          39        —          39  

Interest only/principal deferred

     1,305        40        1,305        40  

Extended maturity

     35        —          35        —    

Extended maturity and interest only/principal deferred

     381        —          427        —    

Additional underwriting - increased exposure

     —          10,572        —          10,572  

Court-ordered concession

     359        —          999        321  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,080      $ 11,319      $ 2,766      $ 11,640  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

The following table shows the loans that have been modified during the prior 12 months which have subsequently defaulted during the periods indicated. The Company considers a loan to have defaulted when it reaches 90 days past due or is transferred to nonaccrual:

 

     For the Three Months Ended June 30,      For the Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020      2019      2020      2019  
     Number of
Contracts
     Recorded
Investment
     Number of
Contracts
     Recorded
Investment
     Number of
Contracts
     Recorded
Investment
     Number of
Contracts
     Recorded
Investment
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Troubled debt restructurings that subsequently defaulted (1):

                       

Commercial and industrial

     —        $ —          5      $ 6,435        —        $ —          5      $ 6,435  

Commercial real estate

     —          —          1        338        —          —          1        338  

Residential real estate

     —          —          1        107        —          —          1        107  

Consumer Home Equity

     —          —          —          —          1        1,317        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     —        $ —          7      $ 6,880        1      $ 1,317        7      $ 6,880  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

This table does not reflect any TDRs which were charged off during the periods indicated.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 the amounts charged-off on TDRs modified in the prior 12 months were $0 and $0.4 million, respectively. During both the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 there were no charge-offs on TDR loans modified in the prior 12 months.

Impaired Loans

Impaired loans consist of all loans for which management has determined it is probable the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreements. Factors considered by management in determining impairment include payment status, collateral value, and the probability of collecting scheduled principal and interest payments when due.

The Company measures impairment of loans using a discounted cash flow method, the loan’s observable market price, or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. The Company has defined the population of impaired loans to include certain nonaccrual loans, TDR loans and residential and home equity loans that have been partially charged off.

The following table summarizes the Company’s impaired loans by loan portfolio as of the dates indicated:

 

     As of June 30, 2020      As of December 31, 2019  
     Recorded
Investment
     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Related
Allowance
     Recorded
Investment
     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Related
Allowance
 
     (In thousands)  

With no related allowance recorded:

                 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 13,052      $ 14,152      $ —        $ 22,074      $ 22,819      $ —    

Commercial real estate

     4,419        4,635        —          7,553        7,808        —    

Business banking

     3,076        4,369        —          2,738        4,062        —    

Residential real estate

     12,502        14,205        —          16,517        17,858        —    

Consumer home equity

     3,279        3,697        —          3,666        3,697        —    

Other Consumer

     22        22        —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sub-total

     36,350        41,080        —          52,548        56,244        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

With an allowance recorded:

                 

Commercial and industrial

     5,812        6,041        3,028        10,296        10,503        2,337  

Commercial real estate

     501        506        230        88        90        40  

Commercial construction

     280        280        22        —          —          —    

Business banking

     17,225        21,418        578        8,920        13,176        571  

Residential real estate

     15,799        15,799        1,639        13,015        14,072        1,399  

Consumer home equity

     2,688        2,688        277        2,889        2,913        322  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sub-total

     42,285        46,712        5,774        35,208        40,754        4,669  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 78,635      $ 87,792      $ 5,774      $ 87,756      $ 96,998      $ 4,669  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

27


Table of Contents

The following tables display information regarding interest income recognized on impaired loans, by portfolio, for the periods indicated:

 

     For the Three Months Ended      For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30, 2020      June 30, 2020  
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Total
Interest
Recognized
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Total
Interest
Recognized
 
     (In Thousands)  

With no related allowance recorded:

           

Commercial and industrial

   $ 12,304      $ 49      $ 16,592      $ 119  

Commercial real estate

     4,401        44        5,946        89  

Business banking

     2,392        17        2,339        36  

Residential real estate

     11,678        125        11,728        252  

Consumer home equity

     3,315        16        3,155        37  

Other Consumer

    
22
 
    
—  
 
    
23
 
     1  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sub-total

     34,112        251        39,783       
534
 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

With an allowance recorded:

           

Commercial and industrial

     6,545        —          9,138        —    

Commercial real estate

     510        —          429        —    

Commercial construction

     93        —          47        —    

Business banking

     12,955        15        10,869        30  

Residential real estate

     14,664        169        14,707        343  

Consumer home equity

     2,706        22        3,087        51  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sub-total

     37,473        206        38,277        424  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $  71,585      $  457      $  78,060      $  958  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     For the Three Months Ended      For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30, 2019      June 30, 2019  
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Total
Interest
Recognized
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Total
Interest
Recognized
 
     (In Thousands)  

With no related allowance recorded:

           

Commercial and industrial

   $ 12,022      $ 108      $ 11,343      $ 177  

Commercial real estate

     11,443        74        11,176        148  

Business banking

     1,465        —          1,332        —    

Residential real estate

     11,935        131        11,978        259  

Consumer home equity

     1,989        26        2,034        51  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sub-total

     38,854        339        37,863        635  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

With an allowance recorded:

           

Commercial and industrial

   $ 4,386      $ —        $ 3,629      $ —    

Commercial real estate

     1,179        —          634        —    

Business banking

     7,314        —          6,937        —    

Residential real estate

     12,606        153        12,625        302  

Consumer home equity

     2,320        30        2,373        59  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sub-total

     27,805        183        26,198        361  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $  66,659      $  522      $  64,061      $  996  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

28


Table of Contents

Purchased Credit Impaired Loans

The following table displays the outstanding and carrying amounts of PCI loans as of the dates indicated:

 

     June 30,      December 31,  
     2020      2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Outstanding balance

   $ 13,572      $ 15,149  

Carrying amount

     12,411        13,451  

The excess of cash flows expected to be collected over the carrying amount of the loans, referred to as the “accretable yield,” is accreted into interest income over the life of the loans using the effective yield method. The following summarizes activity in the accretable yield for the PCI loan portfolio:

 

     For the Three Months Ended June 30,     For the Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020     2019     2020     2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Balance at beginning of period

   $ 3,346     $ 5,526     $ 3,923     $ 6,161  

Acquisition

     —         —         —         —    

Accretion

     (338     (569     (760     (1,142

Other change in expected cash flows

     (10     (338     (165     (400

Reclassification (to) from non-accretable difference for loans with (deteriorated) improved cash flows

     (4     855       (4     855  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at end of period

   $ 2,994     $ 5,474     $ 2,994     $ 5,474  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The estimate of cash flows expected to be collected is regularly re-assessed subsequent to acquisition. A decrease in expected cash flows in subsequent periods may indicate that the loan is impaired which would require the establishment of an allowance for loan losses by a charge to the provision for loan losses. An increase in expected cash flows in subsequent periods serves, first, to reduce any previously established allowance for loan losses by the increase in the present value of cash flows expected to be collected, and results in a recalculation of the amount of accretable yield for the loan. The adjustment of accretable yield due to an increase in expected cash flows is accounted for as a change in estimate. The additional cash flows expected to be collected are reclassified from the nonaccretable difference to the accretable yield, and the amount of periodic accretion is adjusted accordingly over the remaining life of the loans.

Loan Participations

The Company occasionally purchases commercial loan participations. These loan participations meet the same underwriting, credit and portfolio management standards as the Company’s other loans and are applied against the same criteria to determine the allowance for loan losses as other loans. As of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company held commercial loan participation interests totaling $1.1 billion and $965.1 million, respectively.

 

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Table of Contents

The following table summarizes the Company’s loan participations:

 

     As of and for the six months ended June 30, 2020      As of and for the year ended December 31, 2019  
     Balance      NPL
Rate
(%)
    Impaired
(%)
    Gross
Charge-offs
     Balance      NPL
Rate
(%)
    Impaired
(%)
    Gross
Charge-offs
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Commercial and industrial

   $ 668,667        1.62     1.62   $ —        $ 586,346        2.76     2.76   $ —    

Commercial real estate

     305,676        0.00     0.00     —          314,487        0.00     0.00     —    

Commercial construction

     86,636        0.00     0.00     —          64,259        0.00     0.00     —    

Business banking

     38        0.00     0.00     15        57        0.00     0.00     —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loan participations

   $ 1,061,017        1.02     1.02   $ 15      $ 965,149        1.68     1.68   $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

5. Leases

The Company leases certain office space and equipment under various noncancelable operating leases. These leases have original terms ranging from 1 year to 25 years. Operating lease liabilities and right of use (ROU) assets are recognized at the lease commencement date based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term. Operating lease liabilities are recorded within other liabilities and ROU assets are recorded within other assets in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

As of June 30, 2020, the Company had the following related to operating leases:

 

     As of
June 30, 2020
 
     (in thousands)  

Right-of-use assets

   $ 87,573  

Lease liabilities

   $ 91,221  

The following table is a summary of the Company’s components of net lease cost for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020:

 

     Three months ended
June 30, 2020
     Six months ended
June 30, 2020
 
     (in thousands)      (in thousands)  

Operating lease cost

   $ 3,601      $ 7,215  

Finance lease cost

     17        20  

Variable lease cost

     448        970  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total lease cost

   $ 4,066      $ 8,205  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

The rent expense under real estate operating leases for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 amounted to $3.5 million and $7.1 million, respectively. The rent expense under equipment operating leases for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 amounted to $0.2 million and $0.3 million, respectively.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company made $3.5 million and $7.1 million, respectively, in cash payments for operating and finance lease payments.

Finance leases are not material and are included in other assets, net in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

Supplemental balance sheet information related to operating leases as of June 30, 2020 is as follows:

 

     As of
June 30, 2020
 

Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years)

     8.84  

Weighted-average discount rate

     2.63

The following table sets forth the undiscounted cash flows of base rent related to operating leases outstanding at June 30, 2020 with payments scheduled over the next five years and thereafter, including a reconciliation to the operating lease liability recognized in the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheet in other liabilities.

 

     (in thousands)  

Remainder of 2020

   $ 7,098  

2021

     13,746  

2022

     12,746  

2023

     12,206  

2024

     11,402  

Thereafter

     45,534  
  

 

 

 

Total minimum lease payments

   $ 102,732  

Less: amount representing interest

     11,511  
  

 

 

 

Present value of future minimum lease payments

   $ 91,221  
  

 

 

 

6. Goodwill and Other Intangibles

The following tables sets forth the carrying amount of goodwill and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization by reporting unit at the dates indicated below:

 

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Table of Contents
     June 30, 2020  
     Banking
Business
     Insurance
Agency Business
     Net
Carrying
Amount
 
     (In Thousands)  

Balances not subject to amortization

        

Goodwill

   $ 298,611      $ 70,420      $ 369,031  

Balances subject to amortization

        

Insurance agency

     —          6,844        6,844  

Core deposits

     456        —          456  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total other intangible assets

     456        6,844        7,300  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total goodwill and other intangible assets

   $ 299,067      $ 77,264      $ 376,331  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     December 31, 2019  
     Banking
Business
     Insurance
Agency Business
     Net
Carrying
Amount
 
     (In Thousands)  

Balances not subject to amortization

        

Goodwill

   $ 298,611      $ 70,420      $ 369,031  

Balances subject to amortization

        

Insurance agency

     —          7,949        7,949  

Core deposits

     754        —          754  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total other intangible assets

     754        7,949        8,703  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total goodwill and other intangible assets

   $ 299,365      $ 78,369      $ 377,734  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company assesses goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level on an annual basis or sooner if an event occurs or circumstances change which might indicate that the fair value of a reporting unit is below its carrying amount. The Company considered the current economic conditions including the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as it pertains to the goodwill above and determined that there was no indication of impairment related to goodwill as of June 30, 2020. Additionally, the Company did not record any impairment charges during the year ended December 31, 2019.

Other intangible assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable. The Company also considered the impact of COVID-19 as it pertains to these intangible assets and determined that there was no indication of impairment related to other intangible assets as of June 30, 2020.

7. Income Taxes

The following table sets forth information regarding the Company’s tax provision and applicable tax rates for the periods indicated:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,     Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020     2019     2020     2019  
     (In thousands)  

Combined federal and state income tax provisions

   $ 7,197     $ 11,032     $ 8,495     $ 20,710  

Effective income tax rates

     19.4     23.9     18.2     23.3

The Company’s provision for income taxes was $7.2 million and $11.0 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, and $8.5 million and $20.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decrease in

 

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income tax expense was due primarily to lower pre-tax income during the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 compared to the three and six months ended June 30, 2019, while investment tax credits and other favorable permanent differences remained relatively constant.

The Company believes that it is more likely than not that its deferred tax assets as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 will be realized. As such, there was no deferred tax asset valuation allowance as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

The Company files tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction and various states. As of June 30, 2020, the Company’s open tax years for examination by the Internal Revenue Services (“IRS”) were 2016, 2017 and 2018. The Company’s open tax years for examination by state tax authorities varies by state, but no years prior to 2013 are open. The Company believes that its income tax returns have been filed based upon applicable statutes, regulations and case law in effect at the time of filing, however the IRS and/or state jurisdiction, upon examination, could disagree with the Company’s interpretation.

Management has performed an evaluation of the Company’s uncertain tax positions and determined that a liability for unrecognized tax benefits at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 was not needed.

8. Low Income Housing Tax Credits and Other Tax Credit Investments

The Company has invested in several separate Low Income Housing Tax Credits (“LIHTC”) projects, also referred to as qualified affordable housing projects, which provide the Company with tax credits and operating loss tax benefits over a period of approximately 15 years. Typically, none of the original investment is expected to be repaid. The return on these investments is generally generated through tax credits and tax losses. The Company accounts for its investments in LIHTC projects using the proportional amortization method, under which it amortizes the initial cost of the investment in proportion to the amount of the tax credits and other tax benefits received and recognizes the net investment performance in the income statement as a component of income tax expense (benefit). The Company’s maximum exposure to loss in its investments in qualified affordable housing projects is limited to its carrying value included in other assets. The Company will continue to use the proportional amortization method on any new investments going forward.

The following table presents the Company’s investments in low income housing projects accounted for using the proportional amortization method for the periods indicated:

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30, 2020
     Year Ended
December 31, 2019
 
     (In Thousands)  

Current recorded investment included in other assets

   $ 46,552      $ 37,665  

Commitments to fund qualified affordable housing projects included in recorded investment noted above

     23,821        18,042  

Tax credits and benefits (1)

     3,058        5,962  

Amortization of investments included in current tax expense (2)

     2,452        4,782  

 

(1)

Amount reflects tax credits and tax benefits recognized in the consolidated statement of income for the six months ended June 30, 2020 (unaudited) and the year ended December 31, 2019.

(2)

Amount reflects amortization of qualified affordable housing projects for the six months ended June 30, 2020 (unaudited) and the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

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9. Employee Benefits

Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost

The components of net pension expense for the plans for the periods indicated are as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,      Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2020      2019      2020      2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Components of net periodic benefit cost:

           

Service cost

   $ 6,231      $ 4,730      $ 12,463      $ 9,463  

Interest cost

     2,615        2,750        5,232        5,500  

Expected return on plan assets

     (7,425      (5,906      (14,850      (11,812

Past service cost

     6        11        12        22  

Recognized net actuarial loss

     2,361        1,811        4,721        3,622  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net periodic benefit cost

   $ 3,788      $ 3,396      $ 7,578      $ 6,795  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Service costs for the Defined Benefit Plan, the BEP, and the DB SERP are recognized within salaries and employee benefits in the statement of income. Service costs for the Outside Directors’ Retainer Continuance Plan are recognized within professional services in the statement of income. During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company made contributions for the Defined Benefit Plan of $32.5 million.

10. Commitments and Contingencies

Financial Instruments with Off-Balance Sheet Risk

In order to meet the financing needs of its customers and to reduce its own exposure to fluctuations in interest rates, the Company is party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the normal course of business. These financial instruments include commitments to extend credit, standby letters of credit, and forward commitments to sell loans, all of which involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk in excess of the amount recognized in the consolidated balance sheets. The contract or notional amounts of those instruments reflect the extent of involvement the Company has in each particular class of financial instruments.

Substantially all of the Company’s commitments to extend credit, which normally have fixed expiration dates or termination clauses, are contingent upon customers maintaining specific credit standards at the time of loan funding. Standby letters of credit are conditional commitments issued by the Company to guarantee the performance of a customer to a third party. In the event the customer does not perform in accordance with terms of agreement with the third party, the Company would be required to fund the commitment. The maximum potential amount of future payments the Company could be required to make is represented by the contractual amount of the commitment. The credit risk involved in issuing letters of credit is essentially the same as that involved in extending loan facilities to customers. For forward loan sale commitments, the contract or notional amount does not represent exposure to credit loss. The Company does not sell loans with recourse.

The following table summarizes the above financial instruments as of the dates indicated:

 

     June 30, 2020      December 31, 2019  
     (In Thousands)  

Commitments to extend credit

   $ 3,745,517      $ 3,606,182  

Standby letters of credit

     57,402        60,124  

Forward commitments to sell loans

     67,745        21,357  

Other Contingencies

The Company has been named a defendant in various legal proceedings arising in the normal course of business. In the opinion of management, based on the advice of legal counsel, the ultimate resolution of these proceedings will not have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

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As a member of the Federal Reserve System, the Bank is required to maintain certain reserves of vault cash and/or deposits with the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. However, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Federal Reserve temporarily eliminated reserve requirements and therefore there was no minimum reserve requirement as of June 30, 2020. The amount of this reserve requirement included in cash and cash equivalents was approximately $3.7 million on December 31, 2019.

11. Derivative Financial Instruments

The Company uses derivative financial instruments to manage the Company’s interest rate risk resulting from the differences in the amount, timing, and duration of known or expected cash receipts and known or expected cash payments. Additionally, the Company enters into interest rate derivatives and foreign exchange contracts to accommodate the business requirements of its customers (“customer-related positions”) and risk participation agreements entered into as financial guarantees of performance on customer-related interest rate swap derivatives. Derivative instruments are carried at fair value in the Company’s financial statements. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative instrument is dependent upon whether or not the instrument qualifies as a hedge for accounting purposes, and further, by the type of hedging relationship.

By using derivatives, the Company is exposed to credit risk to the extent that counterparties to the derivative contracts do not perform as required. Should a counterparty fail to perform under the terms of a derivative contract, the Company’s credit exposure on interest rate swaps is limited to the net positive fair value and accrued interest of all swaps with each counterparty plus any initial margin collateral posted. The Company seeks to minimize counterparty credit risk through credit approvals, limits, monitoring procedures, and obtaining collateral, where appropriate. As such, management believes the risk of incurring credit losses on derivative contracts with those counterparties is remote.

Interest Rate Positions

An interest rate swap is an agreement whereby one party agrees to pay a floating rate of interest on a notional principal amount in exchange for receiving a fixed rate of interest on the same notional amount, for a predetermined period of time, from a second party. The amounts relating to the notional principal amount are not actually exchanged. The Company has entered into interest rate swaps in which they pay floating and receive fixed interest in order to manage its interest rate risk exposure to the variability in interest cash flows on certain floating-rate commercial loans. The Company has interest rate swaps that effectively convert the floating rate one-month LIBOR interest payments received on the commercial loans to a fixed rate and consequently reduce the Bank’s exposure to variability in short-term interest rates. The Company also has interest rate swaps that are based on overnight indexed swap rates. These swaps are accounted for as cash flow hedges and therefore changes in fair value are included in other comprehensive income and reclassified into net income in the same period or periods during which the hedged forecasted transaction affects net income.

The following table reflects the Company’s derivative positions as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 for interest rate swaps which qualify as cash flow hedges for accounting purposes.

 

June 30, 2020

 
                   Weighted Average Rate        
     Notional
Amount
     Weighted Average
Maturity
     Current
Rate Paid
    Receive Fixed
Swap Rate
    Fair Value (1)  
     (In Thousands)      (In Years)                  (In Thousands)  

Interest rate swaps on loans

     900,000        1.27        0.18     2.57     (38
  

 

 

           

 

 

 

Total

   $ 900,000             $ (38
  

 

 

           

 

 

 

 

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December 31, 2019

 
                   Weighted Average Rate        
     Notional
Amount
     Weighted Average
Maturity
     Current
Rate Paid
    Receive Fixed
Swap Rate
    Fair Value (1)  
     (In Thousands)      (In Years)                  (In Thousands)  

Interest rate swaps on loans

     2,120,000        2.16        1.74     2.11     (321
  

 

 

           

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,120,000             $ (321
  

 

 

           

 

 

 

 

(1)

Fair value included net accrued interest receivable of $1.0 million at June 30, 2020 and $0.4 million at December 31, 2019.

Central banks around the world, including the Federal Reserve, have commissioned working groups of market participants and official sector representatives with the goal of finding suitable replacements for the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) based on observable market transactions because of the probable phase-out of LIBOR. It is expected that a transition away from the widespread use of LIBOR to alternative rates will occur over the course of the next few years. Although the full impact of a transition, including the potential or actual discontinuance of LIBOR publication, remains unclear, this change may have an adverse impact on the value of, return on and trading markets for a broad array of financial products, including any LIBOR-based securities, loans and derivatives that are included in the Company’s financial assets and liabilities. A transition away from LIBOR may also require extensive changes to the contracts that govern these LIBOR-based products, as well as the Company’s systems and processes.

The maximum amount of time over which the Company is currently hedging its exposure to the variability in future cash flows of forecasted transactions related to the receipt of variable interest on existing financial instruments is 2 years.

The Company expects approximately $20.6 million and $10.7 million to be reclassified into interest income from other comprehensive income related to the Company’s cash flow hedges in the next twelve months as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. This reclassification is due to anticipated payments that will be received on the swaps based upon the forward curve as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

The Company expects approximately $12.8 million to be reclassified into interest income from other comprehensive income related to the Company’s terminated cash flow hedges in the next 12 months as of June 30, 2020. This reclassification is due to the amortization of realized but unrecognized gains from the termination of interest rate swaps during the period ended June 30, 2020. At June 30, 2020, the remaining unamortized gain on terminated cash flow hedges is $30.6 million.

As of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company’s exposure to CME and the fair value of interest rate swap derivatives which qualify as cash flow hedges that contain credit-risk related contingent features that are in a net liability position, which includes accrued interest but excludes any adjustment for nonperformance risk, was less than $0.1 million and $0.3 million, respectively. In addition, at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company had posted initial-margin collateral in the form of cash and a U.S. Treasury Note, to CME for these derivatives amounting to $18.7 million and $22.8 million, respectively. The cash and U.S. Treasury Note were considered restricted assets and were included in cash and due from banks and in available for sale securities, respectively.

Customer-Related Positions

Interest rate swaps offered to commercial customers do not qualify as hedges for accounting purposes. These swaps allow the Company to retain variable rate commercial loans while allowing the commercial customer to synthetically fix the loan rate by entering into a variable-to-fixed rate interest rate swap. The Company believes that its exposure to commercial customer derivatives is limited to nonperformance by either the customer or the dealer because these contracts are simultaneously matched at inception with an offsetting dealer transaction.

Risk participation agreements are entered into as financial guarantees of performance on interest rate swap derivatives. The purchased (asset) or sold (liability) guarantee allow the Company to participate-out (fee paid) or participate-in (fee received) the risk associated with certain derivative positions executed with the borrower by the lead bank in a customer-related interest rate swap derivative.

 

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Table of Contents

Foreign exchange contracts consist of those offered to commercial customers and those entered into to hedge the Company’s foreign currency risk associated with a foreign-currency loan. Neither qualifies as a hedge for accounting purposes. These commercial customer derivatives are offset with matching derivatives with correspondent-bank counterparties in order to minimize foreign exchange rate risk to the Company. Exposure with respect to these derivatives is largely limited to nonperformance by either the customer or the other counterparty. Neither the Company, nor the correspondent-bank counterparty are required to post collateral but each has established foreign-currency transaction limits to manage the exposure risk. The Company requires its customers to post collateral to minimize risk exposure.

The following table presents the Company’s customer-related derivative positions as of the dates indicated below for those derivatives not designated as hedging.

 

     June 30, 2020  
     Number of Positions      Total Notional  
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Interest rate swaps

     603      $ 3,775,850  

Risk participation agreements

     66        290,131  

Foreign exchange contracts:

     

Matched commercial customer book

     86        9,252  

Foreign currency loan

     23        7,986  
     December 31, 2019  
     Number of Positions      Total Notional  

Interest rate swaps

     603      $ 3,749,474  

Risk participation agreements

     67        299,576  

Foreign exchange contracts:

     

Matched commercial customer book

     62        29,990  

Foreign currency loan

     23        7,310  

The level of interest rate swaps, risk participation agreements and foreign currency exchange contracts at the end of each period noted above was commensurate with the activity throughout those periods.

The table below presents the fair value of the Company’s derivative financial instruments, as well as their classification on the balance sheet for the periods indicated.

 

     Asset Derivatives      Liability Derivatives  
     Balance
Sheet
Location
     Fair Value
at June 30,
2020
     Fair Value at
December 31,
2019
     Balance Sheet
Location
     Fair Value at
June 30,
2020
     Fair Value at
December 31,
2019
 
     (In Thousands)  

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments

                 

Interest rate swaps

     Other assets      $ —        $ —          Other liabilities      $ 38      $ 321  
     

 

 

    

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

 

 

Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments

                 

Customer-related positions:

                 

Interest rate swaps

     Other assets      $ 171,433      $ 64,463        Other liabilities      $ 51,319      $ 18,057  

Risk participation agreements

     Other assets        995        482        Other liabilities        1,500        606  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - matched customer book

     Other assets        151        469        Other liabilities        40        428  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - foreign currency loan

     Other assets        —          —          Other liabilities        173        203  
     

 

 

    

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

 

 
      $ 172,579      $ 65,414         $ 53,032      $ 19,294  
     

 

 

    

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

      $ 172,579      $ 65,414         $ 53,070      $ 19,615  
     

 

 

    

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

The table below presents the net effect of the Company’s derivative financial instruments on the consolidated income statements as well as the effect of the Company’s derivative financial instruments included in OCI as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2020      2019      2020      2019  

Derivatives designated as hedges:

           

Gain in OCI on derivatives

   $ 3,455      $ 16,054      $ 47,011      $ 21,914  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gain reclassified from OCI into interest income (effective portion)

     7,134        231        10,246        524  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gain recognized in income on derivatives (ineffective portion and amount excluded from effectiveness test)

           

Interest income

     —          —          —          —    

Other income

     —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Derivatives not designated as hedges:

           

Customer-related positions:

           

(Loss) recognized in interest rate swap income

   $ (687    $ (2,129    $ (6,967    $ (3,356

(Loss) recognized in interest rate swap income for risk participation agreements

     (80      (157      (381      (98

Gain (loss) recognized in other income for foreign currency exchange contracts:

           

Matched commercial customer book

     96        (41      69        (40

Foreign currency loan

     (367      (32      30        (24
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total (loss) for derivatives not designated as hedges

   $ (1,039    $ (2,359    $ (7,249    $ (3,518
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company has agreements with its customer-related interest rate swap derivative counterparties that contain a provision whereby if the Company defaults on any of its indebtedness, including default where repayment of the indebtedness has not been accelerated by the lender, then the Company could also be declared in default on its derivative obligations.

The Company also has agreements with certain of its customer-related interest rate swap derivative correspondent-bank counterparties that contain a provision whereby if the Company fails to maintain its status as a well-capitalized institution, then the counterparty could terminate the derivative positions and the Company would be required to settle its obligations under the agreements.

The Company’s exposure related to its customer-related interest rate swap derivative consists of exposure on cleared derivative transactions and exposure on non-cleared derivative transactions.

 

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Cleared derivative transactions are with CME and exposure is settled to market daily, with additional credit exposure related to initial-margin collateral pledged to CME at trade execution. At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company’s exposure to CME for settled variation margin in excess of the customer-related interest rate swap termination values was $0.3 million, and $1.5 million, respectively. In addition, at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company had posted initial-margin collateral in the form of a U.S. Treasury Note amounting to $42.2 million and $27.6 million, respectively, to CME for these derivatives. The cash and U.S. Treasury Note were considered restricted assets and were included in cash and due from banks and in available for sale securities, respectively.

At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 the fair value of non-cleared customer-related interest rate swap derivatives that contain credit-risk related contingent features that are in a net liability position, which includes accrued interest but excludes any adjustment for nonperformance risk, related to these agreements was $51.3 million and $14.6 million, respectively. The Company has minimum collateral posting thresholds with its non-cleared customer-related interest rate swap derivative correspondent-bank counterparties to the extent that the Company has a liability position with the correspondent-bank counterparties. At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company had posted collateral in the form of cash amounting to $51.7 million and $22.2 million, respectively, which was considered to be a restricted asset and was included in other short-term investments. If the Company had breached any of these provisions at June 30, 2020 or December 31, 2019, it would have been required to settle its obligations under the agreements at the termination value. In addition, the Company had cross-default provisions with its commercial customer loan agreements which provide cross-collateralization with the customer loan collateral.

12. Balance Sheet Offsetting

Certain financial instruments, including derivatives, may be eligible for offset in the consolidated balance sheets and/or subject to master netting arrangements or similar agreements. The Company’s derivative transactions with upstream financial institution counterparties are generally executed under International Swaps and Derivative Association master agreements which include “right of set-off” provisions. In such cases there is generally a legally enforceable right to offset recognized amounts. However, the Company does not offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments. The Company nets the amount recognized for the right to reclaim cash collateral against the obligation to return cash collateral arising from derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting arrangement. Collateral legally required to be maintained at dealer banks by the Company is monitored and adjusted as necessary. As of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, it was determined that no additional collateral would have to be posted to immediately settle these instruments.

The following table presents the Company’s asset and liability positions that were eligible for offset and the potential effect of netting arrangements on its financial position, as of the dates indicated:

 

           

Gross

Amounts

    

Net

Amounts

    

Gross Amounts Not Offset

in the Statement of

       
            Offset in the      Presented in      Financial Position        
     Gross      Statement of      the Statement             Collateral        
     Amounts      Financial      of Financial      Financial
Instruments
     Pledged
(Received)
    Net
Amount
 

Description

   Recognized      Position      Position  
     (In Thousands)  
     As of June 30, 2020  

Derivative Assets

                

Interest rate swaps

   $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —       $ —    

Customer-related positions:

                

Interest rate swaps

     171,433        —          171,433        8        —         171,425  

Risk participation agreements

     995        —          995        —          —         995  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - matched customer book

     151        —          151        1        —         150  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 172,579      $ —        $ 172,579      $ 9      $ —       $ 172,570  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Derivative Liabilities

                

Interest rate swaps

   $ 38      $ —        $ 38      $ 38      $ —       $ —    

Customer-related positions:

                

Interest rate swaps

     51,319        —          51,319        8        51,311       —    

Risk participation agreements

     1,500        —          1,500        —          —         1,500  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - matched customer book

     40        —          40        1        (7     46  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - foreign currency loan

     173        —          173        —          —         173  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 53,070      $ —        $ 53,070      $ 47      $ 51,304     $ 1,719  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
           

Gross

Amounts

    

Net

Amounts

    

Gross Amounts Not Offset

in the Statement of

       
            Offset in the      Presented in      Financial Position        
     Gross      Statement of      the Statement             Collateral        
     Amounts      Financial      of Financial      Financial      Pledged     Net  

Description

   Recognized      Position      Position      Instruments      (Received)     Amount  
     (In Thousands)  
     As of December 31, 2019  

Derivative Assets

                

Interest rate swaps

   $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —       $ —    

Customer-related positions:

                

Interest rate swaps

     64,463        —          64,463        1,434        —         63,029  

Risk participation agreements

     482        —          482        —          —         482  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - matched customer book

     469        —          469        7        (462     —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 65,414      $ —        $ 65,414      $ 1,441      $ (462   $ 63,511  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Derivative Liabilities

                

Interest rate swaps

   $ 321      $ —        $ 321      $ 321      $ —       $ —    

Customer-related positions:

                

Interest rate swaps

     18,057        —          18,057        1,434        16,623       —    

Risk participation agreements

     606        —          606        —          —         606  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - matched customer book

     428        —          428        7        —         421  

Foreign currency exchange contracts - foreign currency loan

     203        —          203        —          —         203  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 19,615      $ —        $ 19,615      $ 1,762      $ 16,623     $ 1,230  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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13. Fair Value of Assets and Liabilities

The Company uses fair value measurements to record adjustments to certain assets and liabilities and to determine fair value disclosures. The fair value of a financial instrument is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Fair value is best determined based upon quoted market prices. However, in many instances, there are no quoted market prices for the Company’s various financial instruments. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques. Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. Accordingly, the fair value estimates may not be realized in an immediate settlement of the instrument.

Fair value is a market-based measure considered from the perspective of a market participant rather than an entity-specific measure. Therefore, even when market assumptions are not readily available, the Company’s own assumptions are set to reflect those that the Company believes market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date. The Company uses prices and inputs that are current as of the measurement date, including during periods of market dislocation. In periods of market dislocation, the observability of prices and inputs may be reduced for many instruments. This condition could cause an instrument to be reclassified from Level 1 to Level 2 or from Level 2 to Level 3.

Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. These estimates do not reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the Company’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. Because no active market exists for a portion of the Company’s financial instruments, fair value estimates are based on judgements regarding future expected loss experience, current economic conditions, risk characteristics of various financial instruments, and other factors. These estimates are subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgement, and therefore cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could significantly affect these estimates.

The following methods and assumptions were used by the Company in estimating fair value disclosures:

Cash and Cash Equivalents

For these financial instruments, which have original maturities of 90 days or less, their carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets approximate fair value.

Trading Securities

Trading securities consisted of fixed income municipal securities and were recorded at fair value. All fixed income securities were categorized as Level 2 as the valuations were estimated by a third-party pricing vendor using a valuation matrix with inputs including observable bond interest rate tables, recent transactions, and yield relationships.

 

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Available for Sale Securities

Available for sale securities consisted of U.S. Treasury securities, U.S. government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities, state and municipal bonds, and others such as a qualified zone academy bond, and were recorded at fair value.

The Company’s U.S. Treasury securities are traded on active markets and therefore these securities were classified as Level 1.

The fair value of other U.S. government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities was estimated using either a matrix or benchmarks. The inputs used include benchmark yields, reported trades, broker/dealer quotes, and issuer spreads. These securities were categorized as Level 2.

Municipal bonds were classified as Level 2 for the same reasons described for the trading municipal securities.

The valuation technique for the qualified zone academy bond was a discounted cash flow methodology using market discount rates. The assumptions used included at least one significant model assumption or input that was unobservable, and therefore, this security was classified as Level 3.

Fair value was based on the value of one unit without regard to any premium or discount that may result from concentrations of ownership of a financial instrument, possible tax ramifications, or estimated transaction costs. The estimated fair value of the Company’s securities available for sale, by type, is disclosed in Note 3.

Loans Held for Sale

Fair value of loans held for sale, whose carrying amounts approximate fair value, was estimated using the anticipated market price based upon pricing indications provided by investor banks.

Loans

The fair value of commercial construction, commercial and industrial lines of credit, and certain other consumer loans was estimated by discounting the contractual cash flows using interest rates currently being offered for loans with similar terms to borrowers of similar credit quality.

For commercial, commercial real estate, residential real estate, automobile, and consumer home equity loans, fair value was estimated by discounting contractual cash flows adjusted for prepayment estimates using interest rates currently being offered for loans with similar terms to borrowers of similar credit quality. For loans held for sale, whose carrying amounts approximate fair value, the fair value was estimated by the anticipated market price based upon pricing indications provided by investor banks.

The fair value of PPP loans, which are fully guaranteed by the SBA, approximates the carrying amount.

Loans that are deemed to be impaired were recorded at the fair value of the underlying collateral, if the loan is collateral-dependent, or at a carrying value based upon expected cash flows discounted using the loan’s effective interest rate.

FHLB Stock

The fair value of FHLB stock approximates the carrying amount based on the redemption provisions of the FHLB.

Rabbi Trust Investments

Rabbi trust investments consisted primarily of cash and cash equivalents, U.S. Government agency obligations, equity securities, mutual funds and other exchange-traded funds, and were recorded at fair value and included in other assets. The purpose of these rabbi trust investments is to fund certain executive non-qualified retirement benefits and deferred compensation.

The fair value of other U.S. government agency obligations was estimated using either a matrix or benchmarks. The inputs used include benchmark yields, reported trades, broker/dealer quotes, and issuer spreads. These securities were categorized as Level 2. The equity securities and other exchange-traded funds were valued based on quoted prices from the market. The equities, mutual funds and exchange-traded funds traded in an active market were categorized as Level 1. Mutual funds at net asset value amounted to $46.4 million at June 30, 2020 and $16.2 million at December 31, 2019. There were no redemption restrictions on these mutual funds at the end of any period presented.

 

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Bank-Owned Life Insurance

The fair value of bank-owned life insurance was based upon quotations received from bank-owned life insurance dealers.

Deposits

The fair value of deposits with no stated maturity, such as noninterest-bearing demand deposits, savings and interest checking accounts, and money market accounts, was equal to their carrying amount. The fair value of time deposits was based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows using current market interest rates.

The fair value estimates of deposits do not include the benefit that results from the low-cost funding provided by the deposit liabilities compared to the cost of borrowing funds in the wholesale market (core deposit intangibles).

Other Borrowed Funds

For other borrowed funds that mature in 90 days or less, the carrying amount reported in the consolidated balance sheets approximates fair value. For borrowed funds that mature in more than 90 days, the fair value was based on the discounted value of the contractual cash flows applying interest rates currently being offered in the market.

FHLB Advances

The fair value of FHLB advances was based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows. The discount rates used are representative of approximate rates currently offered on instruments with similar remaining maturities.

Escrow Deposits of Borrowers

The fair value of escrow deposits of borrowers, which have no stated maturity, approximates the carrying amount.

Interest Rate Swaps

The fair value of interest rate swaps was determined using discounted cash flow analysis on the expected cash flows of the interest rate swaps. This analysis reflects the contractual terms of the interest rate swaps, including the period of maturity, and uses observable market-based inputs, including interest rate curves and implied volatilities. In addition, for customer-related interest rate swaps, the analysis reflects a credit valuation adjustment to reflect the Company’s own nonperformance risk and the respective counterparty’s nonperformance risk in the fair value measurements. The majority of inputs used to value its interest rate swaps fall within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy, but the credit valuation adjustments associated with the interest rate swaps utilize Level 3 inputs, such as estimates of current credit spreads to evaluate the likelihood of default by the Company and its counterparties. However, at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the impact of the Level 3 inputs on the overall valuation of the interest rate swaps was deemed insignificant to the overall valuation. As a result, the interest rate swaps were categorized as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy.

Risk Participations

The fair value of risk participations was determined based upon the total expected exposure of the derivative which considers the present value of cash flows discounted using market-based inputs and was categorized as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy. The fair value also included a credit valuation adjustment which evaluates the credit risk of its counterparties by considering factors such as the likelihood of default by the counterparties, its net exposures, the remaining contractual life, as well as the amount of collateral securing the position. The change in value of derivative assets and liabilities attributable to credit risk was not significant during the reported periods.

Foreign Currency Forward Contracts

The fair values of foreign currency forward contracts were based upon the remaining expiration period of the contracts and bid quotations received from foreign exchange contract dealers and were categorized as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy.

 

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The carrying amounts and estimated fair values of the Company’s financial instruments as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 were as follows:

 

     As of June 30, 2020      As of December 31, 2019  
   Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
 
   (In Thousands)  

Assets

           

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 1,432,561      $ 1,432,561      $ 362,602      $ 362,602  

Trading securities

     —          —          961        961  

Securities available for sale

     1,600,354        1,600,354        1,508,236        1,508,236  

Loans held for sale

     2,972        2,972        26        26  

Loans, net of allowance for loan losses

     9,862,980        10,191,776        8,889,184        9,116,018  

Accrued interest receivable

     28,017        28,017        26,835        26,835  

FHLB stock

     8,805        8,805        9,027        9,027  

Rabbi trust investments

     78,808        78,808        78,012        78,012  

Bank-owned life insurance

     77,528        77,528        77,546        77,546  

Interest rate swap contracts

           

Customer-related positions

     171,433        171,433        64,463        64,463  

Risk participation agreements

     995        995        482        482  

Foreign currency forward contracts

           

Matched customer book

     151        151        469        469  

Liabilities

           

Deposits

   $ 11,846,765      $ 11,847,001      $ 9,551,392      $ 9,548,889  

Other borrowed funds

     —          —          201,082        201,082  

FHLB advances

     14,922        14,847        18,964        18,188  

Escrow deposits of borrowers

     14,233        14,233        15,349        15,349  

Accrued interest payable

     370        370        1,712        1,712  

Interest rate swap contracts

           

Cash flow hedges - interest rate positions

     38        38        321        321  

Customer-related positions

     51,319        51,319        18,057        18,057  

Risk participation agreements

     1,500        1,500        606        606  

Foreign currency forward contracts

           

Matched customer book

     40        40        428        428  

Foreign currency loan

     173        173        203        203  

 

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The following tables present the balances of assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019:

 

            Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
            Quoted Prices in      Significant         

Description

          Active Markets      Other      Significant  
     Balance as of      for Identical      Observable      Unobservable  
     June 30, 2020      Assets (Level 1)      Inputs (Level 2)      Inputs (Level 3)  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Assets

           

Securities available for sale

           

U.S. Treasury securities

   $ 60,936      $ 60,936      $ —        $ —    

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

     1,251,799        —          1,251,799        —    

State and municipal bonds and obligations

     281,340        —          281,340        —    

Other bonds

     6,279        —          —          6,279  

Rabbi trust investments

     78,808        71,248        7,560        —    

Interest rate swap contracts

           

Customer-related positions

     171,433        —          171,433        —    

Risk participation agreements

     995        —          995        —    

Foreign currency forward contracts

           

Matched customer book

     151        —          151        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,851,741      $ 132,184      $ 1,713,278      $ 6,279  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities

           

Interest rate swap contracts

           

Cash flow hedges - interest rate positions

   $ 38      $ —        $ 38      $ —    

Customer-related positions

     51,319        —          51,319        —    

Risk participation agreements

     1,500        —          1,500        —    

Foreign currency forward contracts

           

Matched customer book

     40        —          40        —    

Foreign currency loan

     173        —          173        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 53,070      $ —        $ 53,070      $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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            Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
            Quoted Prices in      Significant         

Description

   Balance as of      Active Markets      Other      Significant  
     December 31,
2019
     for Identical
Assets (Level 1)
     Observable
Inputs (Level 2)
     Unobservable
Inputs (Level 3)
 
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Assets

           

Trading securities

           

Municipal bonds

   $ 961      $ —        $ 961      $ —    

Securities available for sale

           

U.S. Treasury securities

     50,420        50,420        

Government-sponsored residential mortgage-backed securities

     1,167,968        —          1,167,968        —    

State and municipal bonds and obligations

     283,538        —          283,538        —    

Other bonds

     6,310        —          —          6,310  

Rabbi trust investments

     78,012        63,945        14,067        —    

Interest rate swap contracts

           

Customer-related positions

     64,463        —          64,463        —    

Risk participation agreements

     482        —          482        —    

Foreign currency forward contracts

           

Matched customer book

     469        —          469        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,652,623      $ 114,365      $ 1,531,948      $ 6,310  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities

           

Interest rate swap contracts

           

Cash flow hedges - interest rate positions

   $ 321      $ —        $ 321      $ —    

Customer-related positions

     18,057        —          18,057        —    

Risk participation agreements

     606        —          606        —    

Foreign currency forward contracts

           

Matched customer book

     428        —          428        —    

Foreign currency loan

     203        —          203        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 19,615      $ —        $ 19,615      $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

There were no transfers to or from Level 1, 2 and 3 during the six months ended June 30, 2020 and year ended December 31, 2019.

For the fair value measurements which are classified as Level 3 within the fair value hierarchy, the Company’s Treasury and Finance groups determine the valuation policies and procedures. For the valuation of the qualified zone academy bond, the Company uses third-party valuation information. Management determined that no changes to the quantitative unobservable inputs were necessary. Management employs various techniques to analyze the valuation it receives from third parties, such as analyzing changes in market yields. Management reviews changes in fair value from period to period to ensure that values received from the third parties are consistent with their expectation of the market.

 

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The tables below presents a reconciliation for all assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) during the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019:

 

     Securities
Available for Sale
 
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Balance at January 1, 2019

   $ 6,045  

Gains and losses (realized/unrealized):

 

Included in earnings

     55  
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2019

   $ 6,100  
  

 

 

 

Balance at January 1, 2020

   $ 6,310  

Gains and losses (realized/unrealized):

 

Included in net income

     55  

Included in other comprehensive income

     (86
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2020

   $ 6,279  
  

 

 

 

Balance at April 1, 2019

   $ 6,073  

Gains and losses (realized/unrealized):

  

Included in earnings

     27  
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2019

   $ 6,100  
  

 

 

 

Balance at April 1, 2020

   $ 6,249  

Gains and losses (realized/unrealized):

  

Included in earnings

     27  

Included in other comprehensive income

     3  
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2020

   $ 6,279  
  

 

 

 

The Company may also be required, from time to time, to measure certain other assets on a nonrecurring basis in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. The following tables summarize the fair value of assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis, as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

 

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Table of Contents
            Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
            Quoted Prices
in Active
     Significant         

Description

          Markets for      Other      Significant  
     Balance as of June
30, 2020
     Identical Assets
(Level 1)
     Observable
Inputs (Level 2)
     Unobservable
Inputs (Level 3)
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Assets

           

Other real estate owned

   $ 40      $  —        $  —        $ 40  

Collateral-dependent impaired loans whose fair value is based upon appraisals

     13,011        —          —          13,011  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 13,051      $ —        $ —        $ 13,051  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

            Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
            Quoted Prices
in Active
     Significant         

Description

          Markets for      Other      Significant  
     Balance as of
December 31, 2019
     Identical Assets
(Level 1)
     Observable
Inputs (Level 2)
     Unobservable
Inputs (Level 3)
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Assets

           

Collateral-dependent impaired loans whose fair value is based upon appraisals

   $ 4,261      $  —        $  —          4,261  

For the valuation of the other real estate owned and collateral-dependent impaired loans, the Company relies primarily on third-party valuation information from certified appraisers and values are generally based upon recent appraisals of the underlying collateral, brokers’ opinions based upon recent sales of comparable properties, estimated equipment auction or liquidation values, income capitalization, or a combination of income capitalization and comparable sales. Depending on the type of underlying collateral, valuations may be adjusted by management for qualitative factors such as economic factors and estimated liquidation expenses. The range of these possible adjustments may vary.

Impaired loans in which the reserve was established based upon expected cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate are not deemed to be measured at fair value.

14. Revenue from Contracts with Customers

The Company adopted the new revenue recognition standard under ASC 606 on January 1, 2019 using the modified retrospective approach. Revenue recognition remained substantially unchanged following adoption of ASC 606 and, therefore, there were no material changes to the Company’s consolidated financial statements at or for the year ended December 31, 2019, as a result of adopting the new guidance.

The Company derives a portion of its noninterest income from contracts with customers, as such, revenue from such arrangements is recognized when control of goods or services is transferred to the customer, in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The Company considers the terms of the contract and all relevant facts and circumstances when applying this guidance. The Company measures revenue and timing of recognition by applying the following five steps:

 

  1.

Identify the contract(s) with the customers

 

  2.

Identify the performance obligations

 

  3.

Determine the transaction price

 

  4.

Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations

 

  5.

Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation

The Company accounts for a contract when it has approval and commitment from both parties, the rights of the parties are identified, payment terms are identified, the contract has commercial substance and collectability of consideration is probable.

 

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Performance obligations

The Company’s performance obligations are generally satisfied either at a point in time or over time, as services are rendered. Unsatisfied performance obligations at the report date are not material to the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

The Company has disaggregated its revenue within the scope of ASC 606 by type of service, as presented in the table below. These categories reflect how the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors.

 

     Three months ended June 30,      Six months ended June 30,  
     2020      2019      2020      2019  
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Insurance commissions

   $ 22,697      $ 24,135      $ 50,174      $ 48,897  

Service charges on deposit accounts

     4,364        6,771        10,462        13,175  

Trust and investment advisory fees

     5,194        4,980        10,289        9,608  

Debit card processing fees

     2,337        2,638        4,807        5,048  

Other non-interest income

     1,485        2,045        3,537        3,919  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total noninterest income in-scope of ASC 606

     36,077        40,569        79,269        80,647  

Total noninterest income out-of-scope of ASC 606

     11,580        5,063        1,757        12,785  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total noninterest income

   $ 47,657      $ 45,632      $ 81,026      $ 93,432  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Additional information related to each of the revenue streams is further noted below.

Insurance Commissions

The Company acts as an agent in offering property, casualty, and life and health insurance to both commercial and consumer customers though Eastern Insurance Group LLC. The Company earns a fixed commission on the sales of these products and services. The Company may also earn bonus commissions based upon meeting certain volume thresholds. In general, the Company recognizes commission revenues when earned based upon the effective date of the policy. For certain insurance products, the Company may also earn and recognize annual residual commissions commensurate with annual premiums being paid.

The Company also earns profit-sharing, or contingency revenues from the insurers with whom the Company places business. These profit-sharing revenues are performance bonuses from the insurers based upon certain performance metrics such as floors on written premiums, loss rates, and growth rates. Because the Company’s expectation of the ultimate profit-sharing revenue amounts to be earned can vary from period to period, the Company does not recognize this revenue until it has concluded that, based on all the facts and information available, it is probable that a significant revenue reversal will not occur in future periods.

Insurance commissions earned but not yet received amounted to $7.7 million as of June 30, 2020, and $3.9 million as of December 31, 2019, and were included in other assets.

Deposit Service Charges

The Company offers various deposit account products to its customers governed by specific deposit agreements applicable to either personal customers or business customers. These agreements identify the general conditions and obligations of both parties and include standard information regarding deposit account-related fees.

Deposit account services include providing access to deposit accounts as well as access to the various deposit transactional services of the Company. These transactional services are primarily those that are identified in the standard fee schedule, and include, but are not limited to, services such as overdraft protection, wire transfer, and check collection. The Company charges monthly fixed service fees associated with the customer having access to the deposit account as well as separate fixed fees associated with and at the time specific transactions are entered into by the customer. As such, the Company considers that its performance obligations are fulfilled when customers are provided deposit account access or when the requested deposit transaction is completed.

Cash Management

Cash management services are a subset of the deposit service charges revenue stream. These services include ACH transaction processing, positive pay, lockbox, and remote deposit services. These services are also governed by separate agreements entered into by the customer. The fee arrangement for these services is structured as a fixed fee per transaction which may be offset by earnings credits. An earnings credit is a discount that a customer receives based upon the investable balance in the applicable covered

 

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deposit account(s) for a given month. Earnings credits are only good for the given month. That is, if cash management fees for a given month are less than the month’s earnings credit, the remainder of the credit does not carry over to the following month. Cash management fees are recognized as revenue in the month that the services are provided. Cash Management fees earned but not yet received amounted to $0.8 million as of both June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 and were included in other assets.

Debit Card Processing Fees

The Company provides debit cards to its customers which are authorized and settled through various card payment networks, and in exchange, the Company earns revenue as determined by each payment network’s interchange program. Regardless of the network that is utilized to authorize and settle the payment, the merchant that provides the product or service to the debit card holder is ultimately responsible for the interchange payment to the Company. Debit card processing fees are recognized as card transactions are settled within each network. Debit card processing fees earned but not yet received amounted to $0.3 million as of both June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 and were included in other assets.

Trust and Investment Advisory Fees

The Company offers investment management and trust services to individuals, institutions, small businesses and charitable institutions. Each investment management product is governed by its own contract along with a separate identifiable fee schedule unique to that product. The Company also offers additional services, such as estate settlement, financial planning, tax services, and other special services quoted at the customer’s request.

The asset management and/or custody fees are primarily based upon a percentage of the monthly valuation of the principal assets in the customer’s account. Customers are also charged a base fee which is prorated over a twelve-month period. Fees for additional or special services are generally fixed in nature and are charged as services are rendered. All revenue is recognized in correlation to the monthly management fee determinations or as transactional services are provided.

Other Noninterest Income

The Company earns various types of other noninterest income that fall within the scope of the new revenue recognition rules and have been aggregated into one general revenue stream in the table noted above. The amount includes, but is not limited to, the following types of revenue with customers: safe deposit rent, ATM surcharge fees, customer checkbook fees and insured cash sweep fee income. Individually, these sources of noninterest income are immaterial.

15. Other Comprehensive Income

The following tables present a reconciliation of the changes in the components of other comprehensive income (loss) for the dates indicated including the amount of income tax (expense) benefit allocated to each component of other comprehensive income (loss):

 

     Three months ended June 30, 2020     Six months ended June 30, 2020  
     Pre Tax
Amount
    Tax
(Expense)

Benefit
    After Tax
Amount
    Pre Tax
Amount
     Tax
(Expense)

Benefit
    After Tax
Amount
 
 
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Unrealized gains (losses) on securities available for sale:

             

Change in fair value of securities available for sale

   $ 511     $ (97   $ 414     $ 34,313      $ (7,612   $ 26,701  

Less: reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income

     163       (36     127       285        (63     222  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in fair value of securities available for sale

     348       (61     287       34,028        (7,549     26,479  

Unrealized gains (losses) on cash flow hedges:

             

Change in fair value of cash flow hedges

     3,455       (971     2,484       47,011        (13,215     33,796  

Less: net cash flow hedge losses reclassified into interest income

     7,134       (2,005     5,129       10,246        (2,880     7,366  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges

     (3,679     1,034       (2,645     36,765        (10,335     26,430  

Defined benefit pension plans:

             

Amortization of actuarial net loss

     4,721       (1,326     3,395       4,721        (1,326     3,395  

Amortization of prior service cost

     12       (3     9       12        (3     9  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in other comprehensive income for defined benefit postretirement plans

     4,733       (1,329     3,404       4,733        (1,329     3,404  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive income

   $ 1,402     $ (356   $ 1,046     $ 75,526      $ (19,213   $ 56,313  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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     Three months ended June 30, 2019      Six months ended June 30, 2019  
     Pre Tax
Amount
     Tax
(Expense)

Benefit
    After Tax
Amount
     Pre Tax
Amount
     Tax
(Expense)

Benefit
    After Tax
Amount
 
 
     (Dollars In Thousands)  

Unrealized gains (losses) on securities available for sale:

               

Change in fair value of securities available for sale

   $ 15,006      $ (3,354   $ 11,652      $ 47,135      $ (10,454   $ 36,681  

Less: reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income

     1,966        (448     1,518        2,016        (459     1,557  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in fair value of securities available for sale

     13,040        (2,906     10,134        45,119        (9,995     35,124  

Unrealized gains (losses) on cash flow hedges:

               

Change in fair value of cash flow hedges

     16,054        (4,513     11,541        21,914        (6,160     15,754  

Less: net cash flow hedge losses reclassified into interest income

     231        (65     166        524        (147     377  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges

     15,823        (4,448     11,375        21,390        (6,013     15,377  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive income

   $ 28,863      $ (7,354   $ 21,509      $ 66,509      $ (16,008   $ 50,501  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes amortization of $0.3 million of the remaining balance of realized but unrecognized gains, net of tax, from the termination of interest rate swaps during Q2 2020. The original gain of $22.3 million, net of tax, will be recognized in earnings through January 2023. The balance of this gain had amortized to $22.0 million, net of tax, at June 30, 2020.

 

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The following table illustrates the changes in the balances of each component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:

 

     Unrealized
Gains and
(Losses) on
Available for
Sale Securities
     Unrealized
Gains and
(Losses) on
Cash Flow
Hedges
     Defined Benefit
Pension Plans
     Total  
     (In Thousands)  

Beginning balance: January 1, 2020

   $ 21,798      $  15,624      $  81,269      $ (43,847

Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications

     26,701        33,796        —          60,497  

Less: Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income

     222        7,366        3,404        4,184  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net current-period other comprehensive income

     26,479        26,430        (3,404      56,313  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending Balance: June 30, 2020

   $ 48,277      $ 42,054      $ 77,865      $ 12,466  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Beginning Balance: January 1, 2019

   $ (19,360    $ 2,988      $ 59,389      $ (75,761

Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications

     36,681        15,754        —          52,435  

Less: Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income

     1,557        377        —          1,934  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net current-period other comprehensive income

     35,124        15,377        —          50,501  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending Balance: June 30, 2019

   $ 15,764      $ 18,365      $ 59,389      $ (25,260
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

16. Segment Reporting

The Company’s primary reportable segment is its banking business, which offers a range of commercial, retail, wealth management and banking services, and consists primarily of attracting deposits from the general public and investing those depo