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Ovintiv Inc. - Annual Report: 2021 (Form 10-K)

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission file number 001-39191

 

 

Ovintiv Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

Delaware

 

84-4427672

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

Suite 1700, 370 17th Street, Denver, Colorado, 80202, U.S.A.

(Address of principal executive offices)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (303) 623-2300

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

Title of each

class

Trading Symbol

Name of each exchange

on which registered

Common Shares

OVV

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

Yes No

 

 

 


 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act):

Yes No  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of registrant as of June 30, 2021

  

$

  8,216,326,855

  

Number of registrant’s shares of common stock outstanding as of February 18, 2022, at $0.01 par value

  

 

  256,769,168

  

 

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of registrant’s definitive proxy statement (“Proxy Statement”) for the registrant’s 2022 annual meeting of shareholders to be held May 4, 2022 (to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission prior to May 4, 2022) are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

Auditor Firm ID: 271    Auditor Name: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP     Auditor Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

 


 

 

OVINTIV INC.

FORM 10-K

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART I

  

 

 

 

 

 

Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties

  

 

9

  

Item 1A. Risk Factors

  

 

32

  

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

  

 

46

  

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings

  

 

47

  

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures

  

 

47

  

 

 

PART II

  

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.    Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

  

 

48

  

Item 6.    [Reserved]

  

 

50

  

Item 7.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

  

 

51

  

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

  

 

80

  

Item 8.    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

  

 

82

  

Item 9.    Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

  

 

144

  

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

  

 

144

  

Item 9B. Other Information

  

 

144

  

 

 

PART III

  

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.  Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

  

 

145

  

Item 11.  Executive Compensation

  

 

145

  

Item 12.  Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Shareholder Matters

  

 

145

  

Item 13.  Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

  

 

145

  

Item 14.  Principal Accounting Fees and Services

  

 

145

  

 

 

PART IV

  

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.  Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

  

 

146

  

Signatures

  

 

153

  

 


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DEFINITIONS

 

Unless the context otherwise requires or otherwise expressly stated, all references in this Annual Report on Form 10‑K to “Ovintiv,” the “Company,” “us,” “we,” “our” and “ours,” (i) for periods until the Reorganization (as hereinafter defined), refer to Encana Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries and (ii) for periods after the Reorganization, refer to Ovintiv Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. In addition, the following are other abbreviations and definitions of certain terms used within this Annual Report on Form 10-K:

“AECO” means Alberta Energy Company and is the Canadian benchmark price for natural gas.

“ASC” means Accounting Standards Codification.

“ASU” means Accounting Standards Update.

“bbl” or “bbls” means barrel or barrels.

“bbls/d” means barrels per day.

“Bcf” means billion cubic feet.

“Bcf/d” means billion cubic feet per day.

“BOE” means barrels of oil equivalent.

“BOE/d” means barrels of oil equivalent per day.

“Btu” means British thermal units, a measure of heating value.

“DD&A” means depreciation, depletion and amortization expenses.

“ESG” means environmental, social and governance.

“FASB” means Financial Accounting Standards Board.

“GHG” means greenhouse gas.

“LIBOR” means London Interbank Offered Rate.

“Mbbls” means thousand barrels.

“Mbbls/d” means thousand barrels per day.

“MBOE” means thousand barrels of oil equivalent.

“MBOE/d” means thousand barrels of oil equivalent per day.

“Mcf” means thousand cubic feet.

“Mcf/d” means thousand cubic feet per day.

“MD&A” means Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

“MMbbls” means million barrels.

“MMbbls/d” means million barrels per day.

“MMBOE” means million barrels of oil equivalent.

“MMBOE/d” means million barrels of oil equivalent per day.

“MMBtu” means million Btu.

“MMcf” means million cubic feet.

“MMcf/d” means million cubic feet per day.

“NCIB” means normal course issuer bid.

“NGL” or “NGLs” means natural gas liquids.

“NYMEX” means New York Mercantile Exchange.

“NYSE” means New York Stock Exchange.

“OPEC” means Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries.

“SCOOP” means South Central Oklahoma Oil Province.

“SEC” means United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

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“SIB” means substantial issuer bid.

“STACK” means Sooner Trend, Anadarko basin, Canadian and Kingfisher counties

“Standardized measure” means the present value of after-tax future net revenues discounted at 10% per annum.

“S&P 400” means Standard and Poor’s MidCap 400 index.

“S&P 500” means Standard and Poor’s 500 index.

S&P/TSX Composite Index” means Standard and Poor’s index for Canadian equity markets.

“TSX” means Toronto Stock Exchange.

“U.S.”, “United States” or “USA” means United States of America.

“U.S. GAAP” means U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

“WTI” means West Texas Intermediate.

 

CONVERSIONS

 

In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, a conversion of natural gas volumes to BOE is on the basis of six Mcf to one bbl. BOE is based on a generic energy equivalency conversion method primarily applicable at the burner tip and does not represent economic value equivalency at the wellhead. Given that the value ratio based on the current price of oil as compared to natural gas is significantly different from the energy equivalency of 6:1, utilizing a conversion on a 6:1 basis may be misleading as an indication of value, particularly if used in isolation.

 

CONVENTIONS

 

Unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in U.S. dollars, all references to “dollars”, “$” or “US$” are to U.S. dollars and all references to “C$” are to Canadian dollars. All amounts are provided on a before tax basis, unless otherwise stated. In addition, all information provided herein is presented on an after royalties basis.

 

The terms “include”, “includes”, “including” and “included” are to be construed as if they were immediately followed by the words “without limitation”, except where explicitly stated otherwise.

 

The term “liquids” is used to represent oil, NGLs and condensate. The term “liquids rich” is used to represent natural gas streams with associated liquids volumes. The term “play” is used to describe an area in which hydrocarbon accumulations or prospects of a given type occur. The Company’s focus of development is on hydrocarbon accumulations known to exist over a large areal expanse and/or thick vertical section and are developed using hydraulic fracturing. This type of development typically has a lower geological and/or commercial development risk and lower average decline rate, when compared to conventional development.

 

The term “Core Assets” refer to plays that have a deep inventory of drilling opportunities and are the primary focus of Ovintiv’s capital investment and development, providing a competitive and efficient profile. Ovintiv continually reviews and evaluates its strategy and changing market conditions in order to maximize cash flow generation from the Core Assets located in some of the best plays in North America.

 

References to information contained on the Company’s website at www.ovintiv.com are not incorporated by reference into, and does not constitute a part of, this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND RISK

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K, and the other documents incorporated herein by reference, contain certain forward-looking statements or information (collectively, “forward-looking statements”) within the meaning of applicable securities legislation, including Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. All statements, except for statements of historical fact, that relate to the anticipated future activities, plans, strategies, objectives or expectations of the Company are forward-looking statements. When used in this Annual Report on Form 10‑K, and the other documents incorporated herein by reference, the use of words and phrases including “anticipates,” “believes,” “continue,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “focused on,” “forecast,” “guidance,” “intends,” “maintain,” “may,” “opportunities,” “outlook,” “plans,” “potential,” “strategy,” “targets,” “will,” “would” and other similar terminology is intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain such identifying words or phrases. Forward-looking statements include statements regarding: expectations of plans, strategies and objectives of the Company, including anticipated development activity and investment levels; the Company’s Core Assets, including the composition of Core Assets and the anticipated capital returns associated with Core Assets; the Company’s capital allocation strategy, capital structure, anticipated sources of funding, growth in long-term shareholder value and ability to preserve balance sheet strength; the benefits of the Company’s multi-basin portfolio, including operational and commodity flexibility, and the ability to repeat and deploy successful operational learnings; the Company’s ability to maximize cash flow and the application of excess cash flows to reduce long-term debt; the ability of the Company to timely meet and maintain certain targets contained in the Company’s corporate guidance, including with respect to capital efficiency, cash flow generation, debt reduction and leverage, the return of capital to shareholders, oil, NGLs and natural gas production, GHG emissions and ESG performance; the ability of the Company to lower costs and improve capital and operating efficiencies, and the ability to maintain such cost savings and efficiencies; anticipated oil, NGL and natural gas prices; the anticipated success of, and benefits from, technology and innovation, including the cube development model, Simul-Frac techniques and other new or advanced drilling techniques or well completion designs; anticipated drilling and completions activity, including the number of drilling rigs and frac crews utilized; anticipated well inventory, drilling costs and cycle times; the Company’s ability to optimize well completion designs, including changes to horizontal lateral lengths, water and proppant volumes, number of frac stages, and well spacing and stacking; anticipated proceeds and future benefits from various joint venture, partnership and other agreements; estimates of the Company’s oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and recoverable quantities; the Company’s expected oil, NGLs and natural gas production and commodity mix, including growth of high margin liquids volumes; future interest expense; the Company’s ability to access credit facilities and other sources of liquidity to meet financial obligations throughout commodity price cycles; the Company’s ability to manage debt and financial ratios, finance growth and comply with financial covenants; the implementation and outcomes of risk management programs, including exposure to commodity price, interest rate and foreign exchange fluctuations, the volume of oil, NGLs and natural gas production hedged, and the markets or physical sales locations hedged; the impact of changes in federal, state, provincial, local and tribal laws, rules and regulations; anticipated compliance with current or proposed environmental legislation, including the costs thereof; adequacy of provisions for abandonment and site reclamation costs; the Company’s operational and financial flexibility, discipline and ability to respond to evolving market conditions; the declaration and payment of future dividends and the anticipated repurchase the Company’s outstanding common shares; the adequacy of the Company’s provision for taxes and legal claims; the Company’s ability to manage cost inflation and expected cost structures, including expected operating, transportation, processing and labor expenses; the competitiveness of the Company against its peers, including with respect to capital, materials, people, assets and production; global oil, NGL and natural gas inventories and global demand for oil, NGL and natural gas; the outlook of the oil and natural gas industry generally, including impacts from changes to the geopolitical environment; anticipated staffing levels; anticipated payments related to the Company’s commitments, obligations and contingencies, and the ability to satisfy the same; and the possible impact of accounting and tax pronouncements, rule changes and standards.

 

Readers are cautioned against unduly relying on forward-looking statements which, by their nature, involve numerous assumptions and are subject to both known and unknown risks and uncertainties (many of which are beyond our control) that may cause such statements not to occur, or actual results to differ materially and/or adversely from those expressed or implied. These assumptions include: future commodity prices and basis differentials; future foreign exchange rates; the ability of the Company to access credit facilities and shelf prospectuses; assumptions contained in the Company’s corporate guidance; data contained in key modeling statistics; the availability of attractive commodity or financial hedges and the enforceability of risk management programs; the Company’s ability to capture and maintain gains in productivity and efficiency; benefits from

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technology and innovations; expectations that counterparties will fulfill their obligations pursuant to gathering, processing, transportation and marketing agreements; access to adequate gathering, transportation, processing and storage facilities; assumed tax, royalty and regulatory regimes; expectations and projections made in light of, and generally consistent with, the Company’s historical experience and its perception of historical industry trends, including with respect to the pace of technological development; and the other assumptions contained herein.

 

Risks and uncertainties that may affect the Company’s financial or operating performance include: market and commodity price volatility, including widening price or basis differentials, and the associated impact to the Company’s stock price, credit rating, financial condition, oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and access to liquidity; uncertainties, costs and risks involved in our operations, including hazards and risks incidental to both the drilling and completion of wells and the production, transportation, marketing and sale of oil, NGL and natural gas; availability of equipment, services, resources and personnel required to perform the Company’s operating activities; suspension of or changes to corporate guidance, and associated impacts to production and cash flows; our ability to generate sufficient cash flow to meet our obligations and reduce debt; the impact of a pandemic, epidemic or other widespread outbreak of an infectious disease (such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic) on commodity prices and the Company’s operations, including maintaining adequate staffing levels, securing operational inputs, executing all or a portion of our business plan and managing cyber-security risks associated with remote work; our ability to secure adequate transportation and storage for oil, NGL and natural gas, as well as access to end markets or physical sales locations; interruptions to oil, NGLs and natural gas production, including potential curtailments of gathering, transportation or refining operations; variability and discretion of the Company’s board of directors (the “Board of Directors”) to declare and pay dividends, if any; the timing and costs associated with drilling and completing wells, and the construction of well facilities and gathering and transportation pipelines; business interruption, property and casualty losses (including weather related losses) or unexpected technical difficulties and the extent to which insurance covers any such losses; risks associated with decommissioning activities, including timing and costs thereof; counterparty and credit risk; the actions of members of OPEC and other state-controlled oil companies with respect to oil, NGLs and natural gas production and the resulting impacts on oil, NGLs and natural gas prices; changes in our credit rating and its effect on our ability to access liquidity, including the costs thereof; changes in political or economic conditions in the U.S. and Canada, including fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, tariffs, taxes, interest rates and inflation rates; failure to achieve or maintain our cost and efficiency initiatives; risks associated with technology, including electronic, cyber and physical security breaches; changes in royalty, tax, environmental, GHG, carbon, accounting and other laws, rules or regulations or the interpretations thereof; our ability to timely obtain environmental or other necessary government permits or approvals; the Company’s ability to utilize U.S. net operating loss carryforwards and other tax attributes; risks associated with existing and potential lawsuits and regulatory actions made against the Company, including with respect to environmental liabilities and other liabilities that are not adequately covered by an effective indemnity or insurance; risks related to the purported causes and impact of climate change, and the costs therefrom; the impact of disputes arising with our partners, including the suspension of certain obligations and the inability to dispose of assets or interests in certain arrangements; the Company’s ability to acquire or find additional oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves; imprecision of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves estimates and estimates of recoverable quantities, including the impact to future net revenue estimates; land, legal, regulatory and ownership complexities inherent in the U.S., Canada and other applicable jurisdictions; risks associated with past and future acquisitions or divestitures of oil and natural gas assets, including the receipt of any contingent amounts contemplated in the transaction agreements (such transactions may include third-party capital investments, farm-ins, farm-outs or partnerships, which the Company may refer to from time to time as “partnerships” or “joint ventures” and the funds received in respect thereof which the Company may refer to from time to time as “proceeds”, “deferred purchase price” and/or “carry capital”, regardless of the legal form); our ability to repurchase the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock, including risks associated with obtaining any necessary stock exchange approvals; the existence of alternative uses for the Company’s cash resources which may be superior to the payment of dividends or effecting repurchases of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock; risks and uncertainties described in Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10‑K; and other risks and uncertainties impacting the Company’s business as described from time to time in the Company’s other periodic filings with the SEC or Canadian securities regulators.

 

Readers are cautioned that the assumptions, risks and uncertainties referenced above, and in the other documents incorporated herein by reference, are not exhaustive. Although the Company believes the expectations represented by its forward-looking statements are reasonable based on the information available to it as of the date such statements are made, forward-looking statements are only predictions and statements of our current beliefs and there

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can be no assurance that such expectations will prove to be correct. All forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10K are made as of the date of this document (or in the case of a document incorporated herein by reference, the date of such document) and, except as required by law, the Company undertakes no obligation to update publicly or revise any forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained or incorporated by reference in this Annual Report on Form 10K, and all subsequent forward-looking statements attributable to the Company, whether written or oral, are expressly qualified by these cautionary statements.

The reader should carefully read the risk factors described in Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10‑K, and in the other documents incorporated herein by reference, for a description of certain risks that could, among other things, cause actual results to differ from these forward-looking statements.

 

 

 

 

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PART I

Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties

 

GENERAL

 

Ovintiv is a leading North American oil and natural gas exploration and production company that is focused on developing its multi-basin portfolio of top tier oil and natural gas assets located in the United States and Canada. Ovintiv's operations also include the marketing of oil, NGLs and natural gas. As at December 31, 2021, all of the Company’s reserves and production were located in North America.

 

Ovintiv’s principal office is located at 370 – 17th Street, Suite 1700, Denver, Colorado 80202, U.S.A. Ovintiv’s shares of common stock are listed and posted for trading on the NYSE and the TSX under the symbol “OVV”.

 

Available Information

 

Ovintiv is subject to the informational requirements of the United States Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and, in accordance with the Exchange Act, it also files reports with and furnishes other information to the SEC. The public may obtain any document Ovintiv files with or furnishes to the SEC from the SEC's Electronic Document Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system (“EDGAR”), which can be accessed at www.sec.gov, or via the System for Electronic Document Analysis and Retrieval (“SEDAR”), which can be accessed at www.sedar.com, as well as from commercial document retrieval services.

 

Copies of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and the documents incorporated herein by reference may be obtained on request without charge from Ovintiv’s Corporate Secretary, 370 – 17th Street, Suite 1700, Denver, Colorado 80202, U.S.A., telephone: (303) 623-2300. Ovintiv also provides access without charge to all of the Company’s SEC filings, including copies of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and the documents incorporated herein by reference, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after filing or furnishing, on Ovintiv’s website located at www.ovintiv.com.

 

STRATEGY AND APPROACH

 

Ovintiv is one of the largest producers of oil, NGLs and natural gas in North America. The Company is committed to safely producing products to drive progress and improve lives with respect and responsibility. Ovintiv’s products provide energy, which in turn supports better education, healthcare and equality opportunities. Ovintiv looks to pioneer innovative ways to provide safe, reliable and affordable energy.

 

The Company’s culture is unique and underpinned by our values. Ovintiv has a track record of driving efficiency in every part of its business. The Company manages risk by continuously driving efficiency gains, creating optionality from a high-quality multi-basin and multi-product portfolio, building flexibility into commercial agreements and an active fundamentals team that provides commodity price risk management, with results being delivered in a socially and environmentally responsible manner.

 

Ovintiv aims to be the leading North American producer of oil, NGLs and natural gas by generating free cash flow and delivering quality returns of both cash to shareholders and on the capital the Company invests in its multi-basin portfolio. The pillars that support the execution of the Company’s strategy include:

 

 

Execution Excellence - The Company is a leader in horizontal drilling utilizing cube development and innovative completions methods that leverage advanced technology. Applicable technologies and operating practices are quickly deployed across the Company’s multi-basin portfolio to achieve a competitive advantage. Technology and innovation enable Ovintiv to reduce development risks, enhance capital and operating efficiencies, and sustainably enhance margins and returns while minimizing its environmental footprint. Ovintiv strives to be a leading operator and has a historical track record of safely delivering quality returns through the commodity price cycle.

 

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Disciplined Capital Allocation - Ovintiv’s capital investment strategy focuses on a limited number of Core Assets to generate cash flow and quality returns. Ovintiv’s investment strategy is flexible, allowing for capital programs to be quickly right-sized in response to the macro commodity-price environment, which preserves excess cash flow to return to shareholders and maintains balance sheet strength.

 

In the fourth quarter of 2021, Ovintiv initiated an innovative capital allocation framework, whereby 25 percent of the Company’s Non-GAAP Cash Flow in excess of capital expenditures and base dividend is returned to shareholders. For further information on the capital allocation framework, refer to Item 5 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

Commercial Acumen & Risk Management - While Ovintiv’s multi-product, multi-basin portfolio and capital investment strategy provide optionality and flexibility, the Company also leverages its innovative supply chain and market fundamentals expertise to support capital allocation and quickly respond in a dynamic commodity price environment. The Company actively monitors and manages market volatility through diversification of price risks and market access risks to enhance margins and returns.

 

 

Drive Environmental, Social and Corporate Governance Progress - Ovintiv embraces stakeholder and societal expectations to continue to grow and change in response to climate change, diversity, equity, inclusion and governance. Ovintiv believes that strong ESG performance can directly contribute to increased efficiency, economic performance, value creation and sustainability. Since 2005, the Company has published an annual Sustainability Report which communicates Ovintiv’s ESG performance and tracks progress on key issues important to stakeholders. Additional information on Ovintiv’s ESG practices can be found on the Company’s sustainability website at sustainability.ovintiv.com.

 

As part of the Company’s commitment to foster innovation and drive emissions reductions, Ovintiv has established an emissions reduction task force chaired by the Company’s Chief Operations Engineer with the purpose of identifying and evaluating operational emission reduction opportunities and other environmental improvements. The Company has focused on improving wellsite and completions designs to reduce fluid usage, methane venting and fugitive emissions. Moreover, Ovintiv has looked to foster collaboration with third party partners, such as government and other organizations to knowledge share and further advance future potential emission reduction technology.

 

In addition, Ovintiv announced a new commitment to reduce Scope 1 and 2 GHG emissions intensity by 50 percent compared to 2019 levels, to be achieved within the next eight years. This new emissions reduction target is also tied to the Company’s employees’ annual compensation program.

 

The foundation of the Company’s strategy is built upon the following elements:

 

 

Top Tier Multi-Basin Assets - The Company holds a multi-basin portfolio of prolific oil and liquids rich plays in North America, including: the Permian in west Texas, the Anadarko in west-central Oklahoma and the Montney in northeast British Columbia and northwest Alberta. Ovintiv’s multi-basin portfolio both diversifies risk and provides optionality due to the commodity mix of the Company’s plays and their geographic locations. As of December 31, 2021, the Company’s estimated net proved reserves comprised approximately 25 percent oil, 27 percent NGLs, which includes seven percent plant condensate, and 48 percent natural gas.

 

 

Financial Strength - The Company has ample access to liquidity to allow the business to be managed through the commodity price cycles.

 

Currently, the Company has access to committed credit facilities totaling $4 billion maturing in July 2024, at attractive rates. During 2021, Ovintiv reduced total long-term debt by over $2.1 billion and is targeting a Net Debt balance of $3 billion. The Company expects to achieve its Net Debt target in the second half of 2022, assuming commodity prices of $85.00 per barrel for WTI oil and $4.50 per MMBtu for NYMEX natural gas.

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People and Values - Ovintiv’s core values of one, agile, innovative and driven guide the Company’s actions. The foundational values of integrity, safety, sustainability, trust and respect guide the organization’s behavior and define expectations in the workplace. Ovintiv takes pride not only in what the Company achieves, but also in how its goals are accomplished.

 

See Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations under Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the impact and response of the coronavirus pandemic during 2021 on the Company.

 

REPORTING SEGMENTS

 

Ovintiv’s operations are focused on the finding and development of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves. The Company is also focused on creating and capturing additional value through its market optimization segment. The Company conducts a substantial portion of its business through subsidiaries. Ovintiv’s operating and reportable segments are: (a) USA Operations; (b) Canadian Operations; and (c) Market Optimization.

 

 

USA Operations includes the exploration for, development of, and production of oil, NGLs, natural gas and other related activities within the U.S. Core Assets that are part of Ovintiv’s strategic development focus include: Permian in west Texas and Anadarko in west-central Oklahoma. Other Upstream Operations comprise assets that are not part of Ovintiv’s current strategic focus and primarily include: Bakken in North Dakota and Uinta in central Utah. The Company’s Eagle Ford assets in south Texas were sold in the second quarter of 2021.

 

 

Canadian Operations includes the exploration for, development of, and production of oil, NGLs, natural gas and other related activities within Canada. Core Assets that are part of Ovintiv’s strategic development focus include Montney in northeast British Columbia and northwest Alberta. Other Upstream Operations comprise assets that are not part of Ovintiv’s current strategic focus and primarily include: Horn River in northeast British Columbia and Wheatland in southern Alberta. The Company’s Duvernay assets in west-central Alberta were sold in the second quarter of 2021.

 

 

Market Optimization activities are managed by the Midstream, Marketing & Fundamentals team, which is primarily responsible for the sale of the Company’s proprietary production to third party customers and enhancing the associated netback price. Market Optimization activities also include third party purchases and sales of product to provide operational flexibility and cost mitigation for transportation commitments, product type, delivery points and customer diversification.

 

For additional information regarding the reporting segments, see Note 2 to the audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

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OIL AND NATURAL GAS PROPERTIES AND ACTIVITIES

The following map reflects the location of Ovintiv’s North American landholdings and assets.

 

 

“Core Assets” refer to plays that have a deep inventory of drilling opportunities and are the primary focus of Ovintiv’s capital investment and development, providing a competitive and efficient profile. Other Upstream Operations comprise base assets that receive limited capital that is directed to maintenance or high margin locations that generate cash flows and returns.

 

The Company’s plays including, “Permian”, “Anadarko”, “Bakken”, “Uinta”, “Montney”, “Horn River” and “Wheatland” refer to the specific areas and locations in which Ovintiv holds an interest in the acreage.

 

12

 


 

 

USA Operations

 

Overview: In 2021, the USA Operations had total capital investment of approximately $1,125 million, drilled approximately 148 net wells primarily in Permian and Anadarko and production averaged approximately 140.0 Mbbls/d of oil, approximately 78.0 Mbbls/d of NGLs and approximately 490 MMcf/d of natural gas. At December 31, 2021, the USA Operations had an established land position of approximately 929,000 net acres including approximately 152,000 net undeveloped acres. The USA Operations accounted for 66 percent of upstream production revenues, excluding the impacts of hedging, and 63 percent of total proved reserves as at December 31, 2021.

 

During 2021, the Company divested its Eagle Ford assets, which included approximately 42,000 net acres, for proceeds of $764 million, after closing adjustments.

 

The following tables summarize the USA Operations landholdings, producing wells and daily production as at and for the periods indicated.

 

Landholdings (1)

Developed

Acreage

Undeveloped

Acreage

Total

Acreage

Average Working Interest

(thousands of acres at December 31, 2021)

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Permian

104

97

24

9

128

106

83%

Anadarko

540

345

16

7

556

352

63%

Other Upstream Operations (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Bakken

99

65

7

7

106

72

68%

    Uinta

233

192

22

17

255

209

82%

    Other (3)

173

78

267

112

440

190

43%

Total USA Operations

1,149

777

336

152

1,485

929

62%

 

(1)

Excludes interests in royalty acreage.

(2)

Other Upstream Operations comprises assets that are not part of the Company’s strategic focus.

(3)

Other may include assets where the Company may pursue growth opportunities.

 

Producing Wells

 

Oil

Natural Gas

Total

(number of wells at December 31, 2021) (1)

 

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Permian

 

1,658

1,560

13

10

1,671

1,570

Anadarko

 

1,709

728

457

115

2,166

843

Other Upstream Operations (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Bakken

 

643

254

32

1

675

255

    Uinta

 

1,432

1,121

17

9

1,449

1,130

    Other (3)

 

-

-

94

77

94

77

Total USA Operations

 

5,442

3,663

613

212

6,055

3,875

 

(1)

Figures exclude wells capable of producing, but not producing.

(2)

Other Upstream Operations comprises assets that are not part of the Company’s strategic focus.

(3)

Other may include assets where the Company may pursue growth opportunities.

 

 

 

NGLs

 

Production

Oil

(Mbbls/d)

Plant Condensate

(Mbbls/d)

Other

(Mbbls/d)

Total

(Mbbls/d)

Natural Gas

(MMcf/d)

(average daily)

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

Permian

68.5

63.2

3.0

2.6

24.6

22.7

27.6

25.3

132

124

Anadarko

39.5

43.0

6.2

6.6

35.9

39.2

42.1

45.8

301

331

Other Upstream Operations (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Eagle Ford (2)

5.8

17.7

0.3

1.0

1.3

4.2

1.6

5.2

10

31

    Bakken

13.3

16.1

0.8

0.7

5.0

3.6

5.8

4.3

30

28

    Uinta

12.7

10.7

0.2

0.1

0.6

0.5

0.8

0.6

12

11

    Other (3)

0.2

0.2

-

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

5

4

Total USA Operations

140.0

150.9

10.5

11.1

67.5

70.3

78.0

81.4

490

529

 

(1)

Other Upstream Operations comprises assets that are not part of the Company’s strategic focus.

(2)

Eagle Ford was divested during the second quarter of 2021.

(3)

Other may include assets where the Company may pursue growth opportunities.

13

 


 

 

Permian

 

Permian is an oil play located in west Texas in Midland, Martin, Howard, Glasscock and Upton counties. The properties within the play are characterized by exposure of up to 10 potential producing horizons spanning approximately 3,000 feet of stratigraphy or stacked pay, an extensive production history and developed infrastructure. At December 31, 2021, the Company controlled approximately 106,000 net acres in the play. The current focus of development is on the Spraberry and Wolfcamp formations in the Midland basin, where Ovintiv holds a large position. During 2021, the Company drilled 80 horizontal net wells. In 2021, production averaged approximately 68.5 Mbbls/d of oil, approximately 27.6 Mbbls/d of NGLs and approximately 132 MMcf/d of natural gas.

 

The Company is focused on capturing efficiency improvements and maximizing liquids and natural gas recovery by accessing layers of the stacked pay simultaneously using the cube development model. This approach utilizes multi-well pads, multi-rig spreads and frac spreads running in parallel to optimize cycle times and increase capital efficiency, while minimizing the surface footprint. Cost reductions and improved cycle times were also achieved through innovative strategies, including the use of Simul-Frac techniques, which is the process of fracking pairs of wells at the same time instead of a single well, optimization of facility designs and the use of locally sourced wet sand in completions activities. The Company’s focus on innovation and efficiency decreased drilling and completions costs by approximately 10 percent compared to the prior year.

 

Oil and natural gas facilities include field gathering systems, storage batteries, saltwater disposal systems, separation equipment and pumping units. The majority of Ovintiv’s acreage and associated oil production is dedicated to a pipeline gathering agreement, which has a total remaining term of 12 years with optional renewal terms. In the event of pipeline capacity constraints, Ovintiv’s oil production is trucked by various third parties. Natural gas is delivered by the Company to the purchaser’s meter and pipeline interconnection point in the field.

 

Anadarko

 

Anadarko is a liquids rich play located in west-central Oklahoma in Blaine, Canadian, Custer, Dewey, Garvin, Grady, Kingfisher, Major, McClain and Stephens counties. The majority of the Anadarko properties are located in the black oil window of the STACK which comprises the Woodford, Meramec and Osage formations spanning up to 800 feet of stratigraphy and in the SCOOP which comprises the Woodford, Sycamore, Caney and Springer formations spanning up to 1,150 feet of stratigraphy. The play is characterized by silt, shale and carbonate formations which provide multiple potential oil and natural gas targets making the play ideal for cube development and long laterals. At December 31, 2021, the Company controlled approximately 352,000 net acres in the play, with development currently targeting liquids rich prospects in the Woodford, Springer, Meramec and Caney formations. During 2021, the Company drilled 51 horizontal net wells. In 2021, production averaged approximately 39.5 Mbbls/d of oil, approximately 42.1 Mbbls/d of NGLs and approximately 301 MMcf/d of natural gas.

 

Since acquiring the asset in February 2019, the Company has significantly reduced cycle times; decreased drilling and completion costs by utilizing cube development, Simul-Frac techniques, and locally sourced wet sand; and enhanced performance through optimizing artificial gas lift. The Company’s focus on innovation and efficiency decreased drilling and completions costs by approximately 39 percent since acquiring the asset in February 2019. In addition to reducing costs, locally sourced wet sand has reduced sand related CO2 emissions as well as airborne silica dust at the workplace and in surrounding communities.

 

The play has significant existing infrastructure and has ample access to major pricing hubs, including Cushing, Oklahoma, the U.S. Gulf Coast, Mont Belvieu, Texas and Conway, Kansas, and a number of Mid-Continent natural gas pipelines. The Company’s oil and natural gas production is gathered at various production facilities, with the majority of oil subsequently transported to sales points by pipeline or sold at and trucked from tank batteries. The majority of Ovintiv’s acreage and associated production is dedicated to long-term gathering and processing agreements with various third parties, which have remaining terms ranging from three to 10 years.

14

 


 

Other Upstream Operations

 

Bakken

 

Bakken is an oil play located primarily in McKenzie and Dunn counties of North Dakota, and in Richland county of Montana. The focus of development includes targets in the Bakken and Three Forks formations. During 2021the Company continued to focus on maximizing liquids and natural gas recovery through spacing and stacking optimization, improving wellbore design and optimizing completions, which reduced costs and improved well performance.

 

At December 31, 2021, the Company controlled approximately 72,000 net acres in the play. During 2021, the Company drilled 11 horizontal net wells. Production averaged approximately 13.3 Mbbls/d of oil, approximately 5.8 Mbbls/d of NGLs and approximately 30 MMcf/d of natural gas.

 

The majority of Ovintiv’s acreage and associated production is dedicated to a gathering and processing agreement, which has a remaining term of 10 years. Ovintiv uses a combination of pipelines and trucks to transport oil to sales points.

Uinta

 

Uinta is an oil play located in northeastern Utah primarily in Duchesne and Uintah counties. The Uinta basin provides a deep inventory of multiple stacked oil horizons with approximately 2,600 feet of oil saturated reservoir rock. At December 31, 2021, the Company controlled approximately 209,000 net acres in the play. During 2021, the Company drilled six horizontal net wells. Production averaged approximately 12.7 Mbbls/d of oil, approximately 0.8 Mbbls/d of NGLs and approximately 12 MMcf/d of natural gas.

 

During 2021, the Company drilled six gross wells on two pads utilizing cube development which captured capital efficiencies.

 

Oil production from Uinta is waxy, ranging from yellow to black, and is transported primarily by truck due to the high heat pour point characteristics of the oil. The Company has oil volume minimum delivery commitments with one refinery in the Salt Lake City area through 2025. Oil production that is not subject to sales commitments is sold monthly in spot markets or transported by rail to other markets, mainly the Gulf Coast.

 

15

 


 

 

Canadian Operations

 

Overview: In 2021, the Canadian Operations had total capital investment of approximately $391 million, drilled approximately 85 horizontal net wells primarily in Montney and production averaged approximately 56.5 Mbbls/d of oil and NGLs and approximately 1,066 MMcf/d of natural gas. At December 31, 2021, the Canadian Operations had an established land position of approximately 1.3 million net acres including approximately 773,000 net undeveloped acres. The Canadian Operations accounted for 34 percent of upstream production revenues, excluding the impacts of hedging, and 37 percent of total proved reserves as at December 31, 2021.

 

During 2021, the Company divested of approximately 264,000 net acres primarily in Duvernay for proceeds of $238 million, after closing adjustments.

 

The following tables summarize the Canadian Operations landholdings, producing wells and daily production as at and for the periods indicated.

 

Landholdings (1)

Developed

Acreage

Undeveloped

Acreage

Total

Acreage

Average Working Interest

(thousands of acres at December 31, 2021)

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Montney

547

367

600

385

1,147

752

66%

Other Upstream Operations (2)

174

123

518

388

692

511

74%

Total Canadian Operations

721

490

1,118

773

1,839

1,263

69%

 

(1)

Excludes interests in royalty acreage.

(2)

Other primarily includes Wheatland and Horn River, as well as assets where the Company may pursue growth opportunities.

 

Producing Wells

 

Oil

Natural Gas

Total

(number of wells at December 31, 2021) (1)

 

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Montney

 

7

6

1,738

1,389

1,745

1,395

Other Upstream Operations (2)

 

6

5

557

466

563

471

Total Canadian Operations

 

13

11

2,295

1,855

2,308

1,866

 

(1)

Figures exclude wells capable of producing, but not producing.

(2)

Other primarily includes Wheatland and Horn River.

 

 

 

NGLs

 

Production

Oil

(Mbbls/d)

Plant Condensate

(Mbbls/d)

Other

(Mbbls/d)

Total

(Mbbls/d)

Natural Gas

(MMcf/d)

(average daily)

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

2020

Montney

0.1

0.1

39.6

37.1

15.7

13.9

55.3

51.0

1,020

918

Other Upstream Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Duvernay (1)

0.2

0.5

0.8

3.9

0.1

1.1

0.9

5.0

10

41

    Other (2)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

41

Total Canadian Operations

0.3

0.6

40.4

41.0

15.8

15.0

56.2

56.0

1,066

1,000

 

(1)

Duvernay was divested during the second quarter of 2021.

(2)

Other primarily includes Wheatland and Horn River.

 

16

 


 

 

Montney

 

Montney is primarily a condensate rich natural gas play located in northeast British Columbia and northwest Alberta. The play includes properties that are primarily located in the Montney formation, where Ovintiv is currently targeting the development of condensate-rich locations, but also includes landholdings with incremental producing formations such as Cadomin and Doig. The Montney formation is characterized by up to six stacked horizons spanning over 1,000 feet of stratigraphy and is being developed exclusively with horizontal well technology. In 2021, total production from the play averaged approximately 55.4 Mbbls/d of oil and NGLs and approximately 1,020 MMcf/d of natural gas. As at December 31, 2021, the Company controlled approximately 752,000 net acres and 385,000 net undeveloped acres in the play.

 

Ovintiv utilizes cube development which has provided sustained efficiencies resulting in reduced cycle times and well costs. During 2021, cost reductions and efficiencies were obtained through optimizing wellbore casing designs, improved wellsite design and enhancing gas lift through innovative automation technology. The Company’s focus on innovation and efficiency decreased drilling and completions costs by approximately 11 percent compared to the prior year and increased lateral lengths of wells drilled, where the longest lateral well drilled during the year was over 15,200 feet. In 2021, the Company drilled approximately 84 horizontal net wells.

 

Ovintiv has access to natural gas processing capacity of approximately 1,555 MMcf/d, of which approximately 1,340 MMcf/d is under contract with third parties under varying terms and duration and approximately 215 MMcf/d of processing capacity which is owned by the Company. In addition, Ovintiv has access to liquids handling capacity of approximately 125 Mbbls/d of which approximately 93 Mbbls/d is contracted with third parties under varying terms and duration, and approximately 32 Mbbls/d is owned by the Company.

 

Other Upstream Operations:

 

Horn River

 

Horn River is located in northeast British Columbia, where development was historically in the Horn River Basin shales (Muskwa, Otter Park and Evie), which are upwards of 500 feet thick. In 2021, the Company’s natural gas production averaged approximately 32 MMcf/d. As at December 31, 2021, the Company had approximately 48 net producing horizontal wells and controlled approximately 187,000 net acres in the play. Ovintiv owns an interest in natural gas compression capacity in Horn River of approximately 285 MMcf/d at various facilities in the area. Ovintiv has a take or pay commitment under the Cabin plant natural gas processing arrangement with a third party, which has a remaining term of 12 years.

 

Wheatland

 

Wheatland is located in southern Alberta and includes producing horizons primarily in the coals and sands of the Cretaceous Edmonton and Belly River Groups. As at December 31, 2021, the Company had approximately 423 net producing wells and controlled approximately 140,000 net acres in the play. In 2021, natural gas production averaged approximately 4 MMcf/d.

 

17

 


 

 

PROVED RESERVES AND OTHER OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFORMATION

 

The process of estimating oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves is complex and requires significant judgment. The Company’s estimates of proved reserves and associated future net cash flows were evaluated and prepared by the Company’s internal qualified reserves evaluators (“QREs”) and are the responsibility of management. As a result, Ovintiv has developed internal policies that prescribe procedures and standards to be followed for preparing, estimating and recording reserves in compliance with SEC definitions and regulations. Ovintiv’s policies assign responsibilities for compliance in booking reserves and require that reserve estimates be made by its QREs. QRE is defined as a registered professional licensed to practice engineering, geology, or geophysics and an individual who has a minimum of five years practical experience, with at least three recent years of experience in the evaluation of reserves.

 

Ovintiv’s Corporate Reserves Group, which consists of five staff, report to the Vice-President, Strategy, Corporate Reserves and Midstream who reports to Executive Vice-President & Chief Financial Officer. The Corporate Reserves Group is responsible for overseeing the internal preparation, review and approval of the reserves estimates and is separate and independent from the preparation of reserves estimates, which are prepared by operations’ teams who report to Ovintiv’s Executive Vice-President & Chief Operating Officer. The Corporate Reserves Group maintains Ovintiv’s internal policies that prescribe procedures and standards to be followed for preparing, estimating and recording reserves, which includes the Company’s reserves manual, and conducting periodic internal audits of the procedures, records and controls relating to the preparation of reserves estimates. Ovintiv’s QREs receive ongoing education on the fundamentals of SEC definitions and reserves reporting through the review of the Company’s reserves manual and internal training programs administered by the Corporate Reserves Group. The Corporate Reserves Group also oversees the engagement of independent qualified reserves evaluators (“IQREs”) or independent qualified reserves auditors (“IQRAs”), if any, retained by the Company.

 

As a member of the Corporate Reserves Group, the Company’s Director, Reserves is primarily responsible for overseeing the preparation of proved reserves estimates. The Director, Reserves has a Bachelor of Science with a degree in Petroleum Engineering from Colorado School of Mines and is a member of the Society of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (Denver Chapter).

 

Annually, each play is reviewed in detail by the QREs, the Corporate Reserves Group, the Company’s executive officers and an internal Reserves Advisory Committee, as appropriate. The Corporate Reserves Group also conducts a separate review to ensure the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and that the reserves estimates are free from material misstatement. The final reserves estimates are reviewed by Ovintiv’s Reserves Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Reserves Committee”), for approval by the Board of Directors. The Reserves Committee comprises directors that are independent and familiar with estimating oil and natural gas reserves and disclosure requirements. The Reserves Committee provides additional oversight to the Company’s reserves process, meeting with management periodically to review the reserves process, the portfolio of properties, results and related disclosures. The Reserves Committee is also responsible for reviewing the qualifications and appointment of IQREs or IQRAs, if any, retained by the Company, including recommending the selection of such IQREs or IQRAs to the Board of Directors for its approval, and meets with such IQREs or IQRAs to review their reports.

 

For year-ended December 31, 2021, the Company involved IQRAs to audit the Company’s internal oil and natural gas reserve estimates for certain properties. In 2021, Netherland, Sewell & Associates, Inc. audited 43 percent of the Company’s estimated U.S. proved reserve volumes and McDaniel & Associates Consultants Ltd. audited 20 percent of the Company’s estimated Canadian proved reserve volumes. An audit of reserves is an examination of a company’s oil and natural gas reserves by an independent petroleum consultant that is conducted for the purpose of expressing an opinion as to whether such estimates, in aggregate, are reasonable and have been estimated and presented in conformity with generally accepted petroleum engineering and evaluation methods and procedures.

Proved oil and natural gas reserves are those quantities of oil, natural gas and NGLs which, by analysis of geoscience and engineering data, can be estimated with reasonable certainty to be economically producible from known reservoirs under existing economic conditions, operating methods and government regulations. To be considered proved, oil and natural gas reserves must be economically producible before contracts providing the right to operate expire, unless evidence indicates that renewal is reasonably certain. Also, the project to extract the hydrocarbons must have commenced or the operator must be reasonably certain that it will commence the project

18

 


 

within a reasonable time. Undrilled locations can be classified as having undeveloped reserves only if a development plan has been adopted indicating that they are scheduled to be drilled within five years.

The Company’s reserve estimates are conducted from fundamental petrophysical, geological, engineering, financial and accounting data. Data used in reserves assessments may include information obtained directly from the subsurface through wellbores such as well logs, reservoir core samples, fluid samples, static and dynamic pressure information, production test data, and surveillance and performance information. Reserves are estimated based on production decline analysis, analogy to producing offsets, detailed reservoir modeling, volumetric calculations or a combination of these methods, based on the unique circumstances of each reservoir and the dataset available at the time of the estimate. The tools used to interpret the data may include proprietary and commercially available reservoir modeling and simulation software. Reservoir parameters from analogous reservoirs may be used as appropriate. In the case of producing reserves, the emphasis is on decline analysis where volumetric analysis is considered to limit forecasts to reasonable levels. Undeveloped reserves are estimated by analogy to producing offsets, with consideration of volumetric estimates of in place quantities. All locations to which proved undeveloped reserves have been assigned are subject to a development plan adopted by the Company’s management. In all cases, the Company’s reserve estimates consider technologies that have been demonstrated in the field to yield repeatable and consistent results, having regard to economic considerations, as defined in the SEC regulations.

 

In general, estimates of economically recoverable reserves and the future net cash flows therefrom are based upon a number of variable factors and assumptions, such as historical production from the properties, production rates, ultimate reserve recovery, timing and amount of capital expenditures, marketability of oil and natural gas, royalty rates, the assumed effects of regulation by governmental agencies, and future operating costs, all of which may vary materially from actual results. For those reasons, among others, estimates of the economically recoverable oil and natural gas reserves attributable to any particular group of properties and estimates of future net revenues associated with reserves may vary and such variations may be material. The actual production, revenues, taxes, and development and operating expenditures with respect to the reserves associated with the Company's properties may vary from the information presented herein, and such variations could be material.

 

The SEC regulations require that proved reserves be estimated using existing economic conditions (constant pricing). Based on this methodology, the Company’s reserves have been calculated utilizing the 12-month average trailing historical price for each of the years presented prior to the effective date of the report. The 12-month average is calculated as an unweighted average of the first-day-of-the-month price for each month. The reserve estimates provided herein are estimates only and there is no guarantee that the estimated reserves will be recovered.

 

Ovintiv does not file any estimates of total net proved reserves with any U.S. federal authority or agency other than the SEC and the Department of Energy (“DOE”). Reserve estimates filed with the SEC correspond with the estimates of the Company’s reserves contained in its reports. Reserve estimates, for the Company’s U.S. assets, are filed with the DOE and are based upon the same underlying technical and economic assumptions as the estimates of Ovintiv’s reserves that are filed with the SEC, however, the DOE requires reports to include the interests of all owners in wells that Ovintiv operates and to exclude all interests in wells that Ovintiv does not operate.

 

The reserves and other oil and natural gas information set forth below has an effective date of December 31, 2021 and was prepared as of January 14, 2022. The audit reports prepared by the IQRAs are attached in Exhibits 99.1 and 99.2 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

The following table is a summary of the Company’s proved reserves and estimates of future net cash flows and discounted future net cash flows derived from proved reserves information can also be found in Note 28 to Ovintiv’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

19

 


 

Proved Reserves

 

The table below summarizes the Company’s total proved reserves by oil, NGLs and natural gas and by geographic area for the year ended December 31, 2021 and other summary operating data.

 

 

 

2021

 

 

U.S.

 

Canada

 

Total

Proved Reserves: (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil (MMbbls):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed

 

291.0

 

0.7

 

291.7

Undeveloped

 

266.6

 

0.3

 

266.9

Total

 

557.5

 

1.1

 

558.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Gas Liquids (MMbbls):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed

 

264.3

 

84.5

 

348.8

Undeveloped

 

170.5

 

85.4

 

255.9

Total

 

434.7

 

170.0

 

604.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Gas (Bcf):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed

 

1,621

 

2,490

 

4,111

Undeveloped

 

915

 

1,543

 

2,458

Total

 

2,536

 

4,033

 

6,570

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Proved Reserves (MMBOE):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed

 

825.5

 

500.3

 

1,325.7

Undeveloped

 

589.5

 

343.0

 

932.5

Total

 

1,415.0

 

843.3

 

2,258.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percent Proved Developed

 

58%

 

59%

 

59%

Percent Proved Undeveloped

 

42%

 

41%

 

41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Production (MBOE/d)

 

299.7

 

234.2

 

533.9

Capital Investments (millions)

 

1,125

 

391

 

1,516

Total Net Productive Wells (2)

 

4,109

 

1,898

 

6,007

Standardized Measure of Discounted Net Cash Flows: (3)

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Tax (millions)

 

16,300

 

5,454

 

21,754

Taxes (millions)

 

2,009

 

970

 

2,979

After-Tax (millions)

 

14,291

 

4,484

 

18,775

 

(1)

Numbers may not add due to rounding.

(2)

Total net productive wells includes producing wells and wells mechanically capable of production.

(3)

The Pre-Tax standardized measure of discounted cash flows (“standardized measure”) is a non-GAAP measure. The Company believes the Pre-Tax standardized measure is a useful measure in addition to the After-Tax standardized measure, as it assists in both the estimation of future cash flows of the current reserves as well as in making relative value comparisons among peer companies. The After-Tax standardized measure is dependent on the unique tax situation of each individual company, while the Pre-Tax standardized measure is based on prices and discount factors, which are more consistent between peer companies. See Note 28 to Ovintiv’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the standardized measure.

 

20

 


 

 

Changes to the Company’s proved reserves during 2021 are summarized in the table below:

 

2021 (1)

 

 

Oil

(MMbbls)

 

NGLs

(MMbbls)

 

Natural Gas

(Bcf)

 

Total

(MMBOE)

 

Beginning of year

 

592.3

 

 

580.5

 

 

4,918

 

 

1,992.5

 

  Revisions and improved recovery (2)

 

(78.0

)

 

(50.3

)

 

363

 

 

(67.8

)

  Extensions and discoveries

 

121.5

 

 

142.0

 

 

1,966

 

 

591.2

 

  Purchase of reserves in place

 

2.6

 

 

2.5

 

 

13

 

 

7.3

 

  Sale of reserves in place

 

(28.6

)

 

(21.0

)

 

(123

)

 

(70.2

)

  Production

 

(51.2

)

 

(49.0

)

 

(568

)

 

(194.9

)

End of year

 

558.6

 

 

604.7

 

 

6,570

 

 

2,258.2

 

Developed

 

291.7

 

 

348.8

 

 

4,111

 

 

1,325.7

 

Undeveloped

 

266.9

 

 

255.9

 

 

2,458

 

 

932.5

 

Total

 

558.6

 

 

604.7

 

 

6,570

 

 

2,258.2

 

 

(1)

Numbers may not add due to rounding.

(2)

Changes in reserve estimates resulting from application of improved recovery techniques are included in revisions of previous estimates.

 

In 2021, the Company’s proved reserves increased by 265.7 MMBOE from 2020 primarily due to extensions and discoveries of 591.2 MMBOE from successful drilling and technical delineation, as well as new proved undeveloped locations resulting from updated development plans in Montney, Permian and Anadarko. Approximately 45 percent of the 2021 extensions and discoveries were oil, condensate and NGLs. Revisions and improved recovery of previous estimates were negative 67.8 MMBOE primarily due to changes in the approved development plan of 396.1 MMBOE, partially offset by positive performance revisions other than price of 160.6 MMBOE, higher 12-month average trailing prices of 144.5 MMBOE and 23.2 MMBOE from infill drilling locations.

 

Production for 2021 was 194.9 MMBOE. Purchases of 7.3 MMBOE were primarily properties with oil and liquids rich potential in the Permian. Sales of 70.2 MMBOE were primarily due to the divestitures of the Eagle Ford assets located in south Texas and Duvernay assets located in west central Alberta.

 

Proved reserves are estimated based on the average first-day-of-month prices during the 12-month period for the respective year. The average prices used to compute proved reserves at December 31, 2021 were WTI: $66.56 per bbl, Edmonton Condensate: C$83.69 per bbl, Henry Hub: $3.60 per MMBtu, and AECO: C$3.26 per MMBtu. Prices for oil, NGLs and natural gas are inherently volatile.

 

Proved Undeveloped Reserves

 

Changes to the Company’s proved undeveloped reserves during 2021 are summarized in the table below:

 

(MMBOE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021

 

Beginning of year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

881.1

 

  Revisions of prior estimates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(291.6

)

  Extensions and discoveries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

502.7

 

  Conversions to developed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(160.2

)

  Purchase of reserves in place

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.1

 

  Sale of reserves in place

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.5

)

End of Year *

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

932.5

 

 

*

Numbers may not add due to rounding.

 

As of December 31, 2021, there are no proved undeveloped reserves that will remain undeveloped for five years or more.

 

Extensions and discoveries of 502.7 MMBOE of proved undeveloped reserves were the result of successful drilling and technical delineation, as well as new proved undeveloped locations resulting from updated development plans in the Permian, Montney and Anadarko. Revisions of prior estimates of proved undeveloped reserves were negative 291.6 MMBOE primarily due to development plan changes of 396.1 MMBOE. Development plan changes relate to specific locations that were previously planned to be drilled within five years but were subsequently shifted to a later development timeframe or removed and replaced with different locations that are included in extensions and

21

 


 

discoveries. The downward revisions were partly offset by positive revisions of 66.2 MMBOE from improved well performance, 21.5 MMBOE from infill drilling locations and 16.8 MMBOE as a result of higher 12-month average trailing price.

Conversions of proved undeveloped reserves to proved developed status were 160.2 MMBOE, equating to 18 percent of the total prior year-end proved undeveloped reserves. Ovintiv’s five-year rolling average proved undeveloped conversion ratio is above 20 percent. Approximately 66 percent of proved undeveloped reserves conversions occurred in the Permian and Anadarko in the U.S. and 30 percent occurred in the Montney in Canada. The Company spent approximately $1,069 million to develop proved undeveloped reserves in 2021, of which approximately 79 percent related to the U.S. properties and 21 percent related to the Canadian properties.

 

Purchases of proved undeveloped reserves of 7.1 MMBOE and sales of proved undeveloped reserves of 6.5 MMBOE relate primarily to properties in the Permian.

 

Sales Volumes, Prices and Production Costs

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s production by final product sold, average sales price, and production cost per BOE for each of the last three years by geographic area:

 

 

Production

 

Average Sales Price (1)

 

Average Production Cost (2)

 

 

Oil

(MMbbls)

NGLs

(MMbbls)

Natural Gas

(Bcf)

 

Oil

($/bbl)

NGLs

($/bbl)

Natural Gas

($/Mcf)

 

($/BOE)

2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA (3)

 

51.1

28.5

179

 

65.69

30.32

3.71

 

9.12

Canada (4)

 

0.1

20.5

389

 

56.71

56.48

3.52

 

12.37

Total

 

51.2

49.0

568

 

65.67

41.28

3.58

 

10.55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA (3)

 

55.2

29.8

194

 

36.84

11.85

1.60

 

7.99

Canada (4)

 

0.2

20.5

367

 

32.58

29.37

2.01

 

11.45

Total

 

55.4

50.3

561

 

36.83

18.99

1.87

 

9.41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA (3)

 

59.2

28.6

200

 

56.19

15.83

1.90

 

8.54

Canada (4)

 

0.2

21.6

376

 

53.19

40.25

2.01

 

11.76

China (5)

 

0.6

-

-

 

66.37

-

-

 

23.95

Total

 

60.0

50.2

576

 

56.27

26.33

1.97

 

9.90

 

(1)

Excludes the impact of commodity derivatives.

(2)

Excludes ad valorem, severance and property taxes.

(3)

As at December 31, 2021, there was no production from fields that comprise greater than 15 percent of the Company’s total reserves. Annual production from fields that comprise greater than 15 percent of the Company’s total proved reserves for the respective prior periods ended related to:

- Midland county in Permian: 2020 - 8.1 MMbbls of oil, 4.4 MMbbls of NGLs and 23 Bcf of natural gas; and 2019 - 10.2 MMbbls of oil, 4.2 MMbbls of NGLs and 22 Bcf of natural gas.

- Stack in Anadarko: 2019 - 13.2 MMbbls of oil, 10.0 MMbbls of NGLs and 72 Bcf of natural gas.

(4)

Annual production from fields that comprise greater than 15 percent of the Company’s total proved reserves related to B.C. Montney: 2021 - 9.1 MMbbls of NGLs and 282 Bcf of natural gas; 2020 - 10.2 MMbbls of NGLs and 272 Bcf of natural gas; and 2019 - 12.5 MMbbls of NGLs and 283 Bcf of natural gas.

(5)

The Company acquired offshore China operations as part of the Newfield acquisition on February 13, 2019. Effective July 31, 2019, the Company terminated the production sharing contract with CNOOC and exited China. Production reported are presented for the period from February 14, 2019 through July 31, 2019.

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Drilling and other exploratory and development activities (1, 2)

The following tables summarize the Company’s gross participation and net interest in wells drilled for the periods indicated by geographic area.

 

 

Exploratory

Development

Total

 

Productive

Dry

Productive

Dry

Productive

Dry

 

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

-

-

-

-

180

148

-

-

180

148

-

-

Canada

1

1

-

-

114

84

-

-

115

85

-

-

Total

1

1

-

-

294

232

-

-

295

233

-

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

-

-

-

-

229

208

1

1

229

208

1

1

Canada

-

-

-

-

97

74

-

-

97

74

-

-

Total

-

-

-

-

326

282

1

1

326

282

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA

-

-

-

-

392

236

-

-

392

236

-

-

Canada

1

1

-

-

125

91

-

-

126

92

-

-

Total

1

1

-

-

517

327

-

-

518

328

-

-

 

(1)

“Gross” wells are the total number of wells in which the Company has a working interest.

(2)

“Net” wells are the number of wells obtained by aggregating the Company’s working interest in each of its gross wells.

 

Drilling and other exploratory and development activities (1, 2)

 

The following table summarizes the number of wells in the process of drilling or in active completion stages and the number of wells suspended or waiting on completion by geographic area at December 31, 2021.

 

 

Wells in the Process of Drilling or in Active Completion

Wells Suspended or Waiting on Completion (3)

 

Exploratory

Development

Exploratory

Development

 

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

USA

-

-

29

26

-

-

18

15

Canada

-

-

14

14

-

-

14

11

Total

-

-

43

40

-

-

32

26

 

(1)

“Gross” wells are the total number of wells in which the Company has a working interest.

(2)

“Net” wells are the number of wells obtained by aggregating the Company’s working interest in each of its gross wells.

(3)

Wells suspended or waiting on completion include exploratory and development wells where drilling has occurred, but the wells are awaiting the completion of hydraulic fracturing or other completion activities or the resumption of drilling in the future.

 

Oil and natural gas properties, wells, operations, and acreage

 

The following table summarizes the number of producing wells and wells mechanically capable of production by geographic area at December 31, 2021.

 

Productive Wells (1, 2)

Oil (3)

Natural Gas (4)

Total

 

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

USA

5,637

3,816

716

293

6,353

4,109

Canada

13

11

2,339

1,887

2,352

1,898

Total

5,650

3,827

3,055

2,180

8,705

6,007

 

(1)

“Gross” wells are the total number of wells in which the Company has a working interest.

(2)

“Net” wells are the number of wells obtained by aggregating the Company’s working interest in each of its gross wells.

(3)

Includes 5 gross oil wells (5 net oil wells) containing multiple completions.

(4)

Includes 859 gross natural gas wells (746 net natural gas wells) containing multiple completions.

23

 


 

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s developed, undeveloped and total landholdings by geographic area as at December 31, 2021.

Landholdings (1 - 7)

 

 

Developed

Undeveloped

Total

(thousands of acres)

 

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

United States

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 — Freehold

859

577

27

18

886

595

 

 — Federal

125

97

33

22

158

119

 

 — Fee

61

13

254

92

315

105

 

 — Tribal/Allotted

81

70

20

18

101

88

 

 — State

23

20

2

2

25

22

Total United States

 

1,149

777

336

152

1,485

929

Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 — Crown (8)

682

463

1,091

757

1,773

1,220

 

 — Freehold

38

26

24

13

62

39

 

 — Fee

1

1

3

3

4

4

Total Canada

 

721

490

1,118

773

1,839

1,263

Total

 

1,870

1,267

1,454

925

3,324

2,192

 

(1)

Fee lands are those lands in which the Company has a fee simple interest in the mineral rights and has either: (a) not leased out all the mineral zones; (b) retained a working interest; or (c) one or more substances or products that have not been leased. The current fee lands acreage summary includes all fee titles owned by the Company that have one or more zones that remain unleased or available for development.

(2)

Crown/Federal/State/Tribal/Allotted lands are those owned by the federal, provincial or state government or First Nations, in which the Company has purchased a working interest lease.

(3)

Freehold lands are owned by individuals (other than a government or the Company), in which the Company holds a working interest lease.

(4)

Excludes interests in royalty acreage.

(5)

Gross acres are the total area of properties in which the Company has a working interest.

(6)

Net acres are the sum of the Company’s fractional working interest in gross acres.

(7)

Undeveloped acreage refers to those acres on which wells have not been drilled or completed to a point that would permit the production of economic quantities of oil or gas regardless of whether such acreage contains proved reserves.

(8)

Includes acreage related to the Deep Panuke natural gas field located offshore Nova Scotia. The Company has permanently ceased production and the offshore platform and associated infrastructure was decommissioned.

 

Of the total 2.2 million net acres, approximately 2.0 million net acres is held by production. The table above includes acreage subject to leases that will expire over the next three years: 2022 - approximately 161,000 net acres; 2023 - approximately 15,000 net acres; and 2024 - approximately 3,000 net acres, if the Company does not establish production or take any other action to extend the terms. For acreage that the Company intends to further develop, Ovintiv will perform operational and administrative actions to continue the lease terms that are set to expire. As a result, it is not expected that a significant portion of the Company’s net acreage will expire before such actions occur.

 

Title to Properties

 

As is customary in the oil and natural gas industry, a preliminary review of title records, which may include opinions or reports of appropriate professionals or counsel, is made at the time Ovintiv acquires properties. The Company believes that title to all of the various interests set forth in the above table is satisfactory and consistent with the standards generally accepted in the oil and natural gas industry, subject only to immaterial exceptions that do not detract substantially from the value of the interests or materially interfere with their use in Ovintiv’s operations. The interests owned by Ovintiv may be subject to one or more royalty, overriding royalty, or other outstanding interests (including disputes related to such interests) customary in the industry. The interests may additionally be subject to obligations or duties under applicable laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, and orders of arbitral or governmental authorities. In addition, the interests may be subject to burdens such as production payments, net profits interests, liens incident to operating agreements and current taxes, development obligations under oil and natural gas leases, and other encumbrances, easements, and restrictions, none of which detract substantially from the value of the interests or materially interfere with their use in the Company’s operations.

24

 


 

MARKETING ACTIVITIES

 

Market Optimization activities are managed by Ovintiv’s Midstream, Marketing & Fundamentals team, which is responsible for the sale of the Company’s proprietary production and enhancing the associated netback price. In marketing its production, Ovintiv looks to minimize market related curtailment, maximize realized prices and manage concentration of credit-risk exposure. Market Optimization activities include third party purchases and sales of product to provide operational flexibility and cost mitigation for transportation commitments, product type, delivery points and customer diversification. In conjunction with certain divestitures, the Company has also agreed to market and transport certain portions of the acquirer’s production with remaining terms of less than one year.

 

Ovintiv’s produced oil, NGLs and natural gas, are primarily marketed to refiners, local distributing companies, energy marketing companies and aggregators. Prices received by Ovintiv are based primarily upon prevailing market index prices in the region in which it is sold. Prices are impacted by regional and global supply and demand and by competing fuels in such markets.

 

Ovintiv’s oil production is sold under short-term and long-term contracts that range up to four years or under dedication agreements, for which prices received by Ovintiv are based primarily upon the prevailing index prices in the relevant region where the product is sold. The Company also has firm transport contracts to deliver oil to other downstream markets. Ovintiv’s NGLs production is sold under short-term and long-term contracts that range up to seven years, or under dedication arrangements at the relevant market price at the time the product is sold. Ovintiv's natural gas production is sold under short-term and long-term delivery contracts with terms ranging up to two years in duration, at the relevant monthly or daily market price at the time the product is sold. The Company also has firm transport contracts to deliver natural gas production to other downstream markets, including Dawn.

 

Ovintiv also seeks to mitigate the market risk associated with future cash flows by entering into various financial derivative instruments used to manage price risk relating to produced oil, NGLs and natural gas. Details of contracts related to Ovintiv’s various financial risk management positions are found in Note 25 to Ovintiv’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

The Company enters into various contractual agreements to sell oil, NGLs and natural gas, some of which require the delivery of fixed and determinable quantities. As of December 31, 2021, the Company was committed to deliver approximately 109,167 Mbbls of oil and approximately 98 MMcf of natural gas in the USA Operations and approximately 7,990 Mbbls of oil and NGLs and approximately 77 MMcf of natural gas in the Canadian Operations with varying contract terms. The Company has one oil minimum volume sales contract related to Uinta production in Utah. Given the limited access to transportation and refining facilities resulting from the paraffin content in Uinta oil production, volatility in commodity prices and changes in capital and development plans, deficiency fees incurred can vary and may be incurred on the remaining committed deliveries of 20 Mbbls/d through August 2025.

 

Certain transportation and processing commitments result in the following financial commitments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

($ millions)

1 Year

 

2-3 Years

 

4-5 Years

 

> 5 years

 

Total

Transportation & Processing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Oil & NGLs

56

 

113

 

117

 

74

 

360

  Natural Gas

191

 

290

 

87

 

129

 

697

  Total USA Operations

247

 

403

 

204

 

203

 

1,057

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canadian Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Oil & NGLs

88

 

173

 

156

 

178

 

595

  Natural Gas

415

 

741

 

498

 

1,545

 

3,199

  Total Canadian Operations

503

 

914

 

654

 

1,723

 

3,794

Total USA and Canadian Operations

750

 

1,317

 

858

 

1,926

 

4,851

 

In general, Ovintiv expects to fulfill its delivery commitments with oil, NGLs and natural gas production from proved developed reserves, with longer term delivery commitments to be filled from the Company’s proved undeveloped reserves. Where proved reserves are not sufficient to satisfy the Company’s delivery commitments, Ovintiv can and may use spot market purchases to satisfy the respective commitments. In addition, for the Company’s long-term transportation and processing agreements, Ovintiv also expects to fulfill delivery

25

 


 

commitments from the future development of resources not yet characterized as proved reserves. Likewise, where delivery commitments are not transferred along with property divestitures, Ovintiv may market and transport certain portions of the acquirer’s production to meet the delivery requirements.

 

In addition, oil, NGLs and natural gas production from the Company’s reserves are not subject to any priorities or curtailments that may affect quantities delivered to its customers or any priority allocations or price limitations imposed by federal or state regulatory agencies, or any other factors beyond the Company’s control that may affect Ovintiv’s ability to meet contractual obligations other than those discussed in Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

MAJOR CUSTOMERS

 

In connection with the marketing and sale of the Company’s oil, NGLs and natural gas production and purchased product for the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company had one customer, Vitol Inc., which individually accounted for more than 10 percent of the Company’s consolidated revenues (2020 - one customer, Vitol Inc. and 2019 - one customer, Vitol Inc.). Ovintiv does not believe that the loss of any single customer would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations. Further information on Ovintiv’s major customers is found in Note 2 to Ovintiv’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

COMPETITION

 

The Company’s competitors include national, integrated and independent oil and natural gas companies, as well as oil and natural gas marketers and other participants in other industries supplying energy and fuel to industrial, commercial and individual consumers. All aspects of the oil and natural gas industry are highly competitive and Ovintiv actively competes with other companies in the industry, particularly in the following areas:

 

 

Exploration for and development of new sources of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves;

 

Reserves and property acquisitions;

 

Transportation and marketing of oil, NGLs, natural gas and diluents;

 

Access to services and equipment to carry out exploration, development and operating activities; and

 

Attracting and retaining experienced industry personnel.

 

The oil and natural gas industry also competes with other industries focused on providing alternative forms of energy to consumers. Competitive forces can lead to cost increases or result in an oversupply of oil, NGLs or natural gas.

 

HUMAN CAPITAL

 

Ovintiv strives to be one of the most competitive energy companies in North America, bringing together the brightest minds and best technologies to fuel innovation and maximize operational performance and results. Recruiting, developing and retaining Ovintiv’s workforce is vital to the Company’s future success. Ovintiv has a history of hiring top industry talent and recruiting individuals from within and outside of the oil and natural gas industry who will thrive in the Company’s unique culture. The Company’s core values of one, agile, innovative and driven, and foundational values of integrity, safety, sustainability, trust and respect guide behaviour and define what Ovintiv expects of its employees in the workplace. These expectations reflect and support the Company’s corporate strategy, culture and organizational priorities. Ovintiv is committed to fair labor practices in its operations and adheres to all applicable workplace and employment standards.

 

At December 31, 2021, the Company employed 1,713 employees. The following table outlines our employees by geographic area.

 

Employees

U.S.

985

Canada

728

Total

1,713

 

26

 


 

 

The Company also engages a number of contractors and service providers.

Employee Development and Retention

 

Ovintiv’s success is the direct result of a talented workforce and the Company’s expectation to share ideas and work together to achieve company goals. Ovintiv’s culture is defined by constant innovation, promoting internal collaboration as a way for employees to implement successful strategies and best practices across the Company’s business. Opportunities are provided for Ovintiv’s employees to further develop leadership skills, technical and business skills through on-the-job work experiences and job rotations, development opportunities, networking and mentoring circles, as well as formal learning programs and instructor led workshops. The Company also offers new graduate and intern opportunities in both technical and professional disciplines to support the recruitment of top talent, hiring an average of 17 new graduates and 44 interns per year over the past three years. In addition, the Company has a robust approach to succession planning of key personnel which assesses the competencies, experience, leadership capabilities, and development opportunities of identified succession candidates.

 

Ovintiv’s compensation and benefits program is designed to attract and retain the talent necessary to achieve the Company’s business strategy by rewarding individual performance as well as company performance. The Company’s compensation model is tied to financial and operational metrics which align to Ovintiv’s strategic plan. In addition, the compensation philosophy is anchored by two key objectives: a) delivering competitive base salaries and benefits and b) rewarding short and long-term performance through the grant of an annual cash bonus and long-term incentive awards (“LTI awards”). LTI awards are primarily performance-based and are designed to incentivize delivery of the Company’s strategy and long-term value creation with the payout of these awards correlating to Ovintiv’s stock price performance. Settlement of certain awards can be either in shares of common stock or cash at the discretion of the Human Resources and Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors. Awards that settle in shares of common stock do not result in beneficial ownership until the awards are settled. See Note 22. Compensation Plans and Note 23. Pensions and Other Post-Employment Benefits to Ovintiv’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

As of December 31, 2021, the average tenure of our employees is over nine years and voluntary turnover is less than six percent.

 

Diversity and Inclusion

 

The Company values diversity and fosters inclusion, believing that diverse perspectives and experience enhances Ovintiv’s overall effectiveness and performance. As part of the Company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, Ovintiv has assembled an internal diversity, equity and inclusion working group accountable to the executive leadership team and made up of a broad representation of the Company’s workforce. The mandate of the group is to provide a sounding board for initiatives and communication. Ovintiv has also launched an inclusive network called Leveraging Inclusion, Networking and Knowledge (“LINK”), to help provide opportunities for all employees to engage, collaborate, learn and grow, in addition to fostering an environment where diverse perspectives are celebrated. In addition, formal training and resources have been provided to leaders of all levels on inclusive leadership and interrupting bias and have taken training on understanding the types of unconscious bias, and how they show up in the workplace.

 

Ovintiv strives to provide equal opportunity in recruitment, career development, promotion, training and rewards for its employees. The Company actively facilitates professional development for women and other minority groups through its internal diversity network, targeted succession planning and formal mentoring programs. In order to broaden the diversity of the Company’s talent pipeline, Ovintiv also participates in programs targeting diverse students in junior and high schools, with the purpose of advancing and strengthening its workforce.

Specific to gender diversity, women at Ovintiv comprised approximately 60 percent of the executive leadership team reporting to the Chief Executive Officer, approximately 32 percent of the senior leadership group and approximately 31 percent of all employees at December 31, 2021.

 

27

 


 

 

Employee Safety & Wellness

 

Safety is a foundational value at Ovintiv. Ensuring safety of employees, suppliers, and the community is a tenet of managing the Company’s operations. Strong safety performance reflects a well-run business and builds confidence in the communities where Ovintiv operates. Ovintiv ensures workplace safety with regular comprehensive training and orientation programs for employees and contractors. Employees and contractors are expected to comply with Ovintiv’s process safety protocols, regulatory compliance, and are required to report incidents and near-miss events. As at December 31, 2021, Ovintiv had its eighth consecutive safest year.

 

As a result, safety metrics under the Company’s Environment, Health and Safety (“EH&S”) scorecard are tied into the Company’s compensation program, allowing the Board of Directors to adjust annual bonus payouts up or down based on the Company’s demonstrated EH&S performance. Metrics reflected in the EH&S scorecard include Total Recordable Injury Frequency, Spill Intensity, Flaring and Venting, and Methane Intensity, all of which are described in the Proxy Statement relating to the Company’s 2022 annual meeting of shareholders, which is incorporated herein by reference.

 

GOVERNMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATORY MATTERS

 

As Ovintiv is an operator of oil and natural gas properties and facilities in the United States and Canada, the Company is subject to numerous federal, state, provincial, local, tribal and foreign country laws and regulations. These laws and regulations relate to matters that include: acquisition of seismic data; issuance of permits; location, drilling and casing of wells; well design; hydraulic fracturing; well production; use, transportation, storage and disposal of fluids and materials incidental to oil and natural gas operations; surface usage and the restoration of properties upon which wells have been drilled and facilities have been constructed; plugging and abandoning of wells; pollution, protection of the environment and the handling of hazardous materials; transportation of production; periodic report submittals during operations; and calculation and disbursement of royalty payments and production and other taxes. The following are significant areas of government control and regulation affecting Ovintiv’s operations:

 

Exploration and Development Activities

 

Certain of our U.S. oil and natural gas leases are granted or approved by the federal government and administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Office of Natural Resources Revenue or the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”), all of which are federal agencies. BLM leases contain relatively standardized terms and require compliance with detailed regulations. Many onshore leases contain stipulations limiting activities that may be conducted on the lease. Some stipulations are unique to particular geographic areas and may limit the time during which activities on the lease may be conducted, the manner in which certain activities may be conducted or, in some cases, may ban surface activity. Under certain circumstances, the BLM may require that our operations on federal leases be suspended or terminated. Any such suspension or termination could materially and adversely affect Ovintiv’s interests.

 

In Canada, oil and natural gas mineral rights may be held by individuals, corporations or governments that have jurisdiction over the area in which such mineral rights are located. Generally, parties holding these mineral rights grant licenses or leases to third parties to facilitate the exploration and development of these mineral rights. The terms of these leases and licenses are generally established to require timely development. Notwithstanding the ownership of mineral rights, the government of the jurisdiction in which the mineral rights are located generally retains authority over the drilling and operation of oil and natural gas wells.

Drilling and Production

 

The Company’s operations also are subject to conservation regulations, including the regulation of the location of wells, size of drilling and spacing units or proration units; the number of wells that may be drilled in a unit; the rate of production allowable from oil and natural gas wells; and the unitization or pooling of oil and natural gas properties. In the U.S., some states allow the forced pooling or integration of tracts to facilitate exploration while other states rely on voluntary pooling of lands and leases, which make it more difficult to develop oil and natural gas properties. In addition, conservation laws generally limit the venting or flaring of natural gas and impose certain

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requirements regarding the ratable purchase of production. These regulations limit the amounts of oil and natural gas that can be produced from the Company’s wells and the number of wells or the locations that can be drilled.

Royalties

 

Operations on U.S. Federal or Indian oil and natural gas leases must comply with numerous regulatory restrictions, including various non-discrimination statutes, and certain of such operations must be conducted pursuant to certain on-site security regulations and other permits issued by various tribal and federal agencies, including the BLM and the Office of Natural Resources Revenue (“ONRR”). The basis for royalty payments due under federal oil and natural gas leases are through regulation issued under the applicable statutory authority. State regulatory authorities establish similar standards for royalty payments due under state oil and natural gas leases. The basis for royalty payments established by ONRR and the state regulatory authorities is generally applicable to all federal and state oil and natural gas leases.

 

The royalty calculation in Canada is a significant factor in the profitability of Canadian oil and natural gas production. Oil and natural gas crown royalties are determined by provincial and territorial government regulation and are generally calculated as a percentage of the value of the gross production, net of allowed deductions. The royalty rate is dependent in part on prescribed references prices, well productivity, geographical locations, recovery methods, as well as type and quality of the hydrocarbon produced. For pre-payout oil and natural gas projects, the regulations prescribe lower royalty rates for oil and natural gas projects until allowable capital costs have been recovered. The calculation for wells post payout is based on a percentage of production net of allowed deductions and varies with commodity price.

 

Royalties payable on production from lands other than federal, state or provincial government lands are determined through negotiations between the parties.

 

Sales and Transportation

 

Although oil and natural gas prices are currently unregulated, Congress historically has been active in oil and natural gas regulation. As a result, the Company cannot predict whether new regulations might be proposed.

 

The availability, terms and transportation significantly affect sales of oil and natural gas. The interstate transportation and sale for resale of oil and natural gas is subject to federal regulation, including regulation of terms, conditions and rates for interstate transportation, storage and various other matters, primarily by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). Federal and state regulations govern the price and terms of access to oil and natural gas pipeline transportation. FERC’s regulations for oil and natural gas transmission in some circumstances may also affect the intrastate transportation of oil as the transportation of oil in common carrier pipelines is also subject to rate regulation by the FERC under the Intrastate Commerce Act. To the extent that effective interstate and intrastate rates are equally applicable to all comparable shippers, the Company believes that the regulation of oil transportation rates will not affect our operations in any way that is of material difference from those of our competitors.

 

Project Approvals

 

Approvals and licenses from relevant provincial or federal government or regulatory bodies are required to carryout or make modifications to the Company’s oil and natural gas activities. The project approval process can involve environmental assessment, stakeholder and Indigenous consultation and inputs regarding project concerns and public hearings and may included various conditions and commitments which may arise throughout the process.

 

In 2019, the Canadian government implemented a new environmental assessment framework in Canada under the Impact Assessment Act, which may impact the way large energy projects are approved. Though the Company does not typical own, operate, permit or construct projects which fall under the scope of the Impact Assessment Act, some of the Company’s business may rely on these projects owned, operated, permitted and constructed by others.

 

On June 29, 2021, the Supreme Court of British Columbia declared, among other things, that the province of British Columbia has unjustifiably infringed on the rights of the Blueberry River First Nation (BRFN) by permitting the cumulative impacts of industrial development (activities which include forestry, mining, oil and natural gas,

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agriculture, land clearing, hydroelectric infrastructure, roads and other industrial developments) to diminish the BRFNs ability to meaningfully exercise its treaty rights within an area comprising approximately 9,400,000 acres in northeast British Columbia. As a result, the court ordered the Province and the BRFN to negotiate to establish ‘timely enforceable mechanisms’ to assess and manage the cumulative impact of industrial development on the BRFNs treaty rights. The Province and the BRFNs continue to work towards an agreement with respect to new industrial development activities. Ovintiv’s Montney properties in northeast British Columbia are within the ‘Blueberry Claim Area’ referenced in the Judgement. Oil and natural gas projects, which were permitted or authorized prior to the court decision and where activities have not yet started, will proceed. While the court order has not impacted the Company’s existing production in the Montney, the Province has ceased issuing new permits, and new amendments to previously approved permits, associated with oil and natural gas development activity in northeast British Columbia pending the outcome of negotiations with the BRFN. Should the Province and the BRFN fail to reach an agreement with respect to new industrial development activities, the Company may be unable to conduct exploration and development activities on a portion of its Montney acreage located within northeast British Columbia for an extended period of time.

 

Investment Canada Act

 

The Investment Canada Act requires Government of Canada approval, in certain cases, of the acquisition of control of a Canadian business by an entity that is not controlled by Canadians. In certain circumstances, the acquisition of oil and natural gas properties may be considered to be a transaction requiring such approval.

 

Environmental and Occupational Regulations

 

The Company is subject to many federal, state, provincial, local and tribal laws and regulations concerning occupational health and safety as well as the discharge of materials into, and the protection of, the environment. Environmental laws and regulations (as defined herein) relate to:

 

 

the discharge of pollutants into federal, provincial and state waters; 

 

assessing the environmental impact of seismic acquisition, drilling or construction activities; 

 

the generation, storage, transportation and disposal of waste materials, including hazardous substances; 

 

the emission of certain gases into the atmosphere; 

 

the protection of private and public surface and ground water supplies;

 

the sourcing and disposal of water; 

 

the protection of endangered species and habitat; 

 

the monitoring, abandonment, reclamation and remediation of well and other sites, including former operating sites;

 

the development of emergency response and spill contingency plans; and

 

employee health and safety.

 

Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the assessment of sanctions, including administrative, civil, and criminal penalties; the imposition of investigatory, remedial, and corrective action obligations or the incurrence of capital expenditures; the occurrence of delays in the permitting, development or expansion of projects; and the issuance of injunctions restricting or prohibiting some or all of the Company’s activities in a particular area. Further, certain Environmental Regulations contain citizen suit provisions which allow private parties, including environmental organizations, to directly sue alleged violators or government agencies to enforce Environmental Regulations. Although environmental requirements have a substantial impact upon the energy industry as a whole, Ovintiv does not believe that these requirements affect the Company differently, to any material degree, as compared to other companies in the oil and natural gas industry. For further information regarding regulations relating to environmental protection, see Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Operating and capital costs incurred to comply with the requirements of these laws and regulations are necessary business costs in the oil and natural gas industry. As a result, Ovintiv has established policies for continuing compliance with Environmental Regulations. The Environment, Health and Safety Committee of the Board of Directors reviews and recommends environmental policy to the Board of Directors for approval and oversees compliance with government laws and regulations. Monitoring and reporting programs for environmental, health and safety performance in day-to-day operations, as well as inspections and assessments, are designed to provide assurance that environmental and regulatory standards are met. The Company has established operating procedures

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and training programs designed to limit the environmental impact of the Company’s field facilities and identify, communicate and comply with changes in existing laws and regulations. Contingency plans are in place for a timely response to an environmental event and remediation/reclamation programs are in place and utilized to restore the environment. In addition, the Board of Directors is advised of significant contraventions thereof, and receives updates on trends, issues or events which could have a significant impact on the Company.

The Company believes that the cost of maintaining compliance with these existing laws and regulations will not have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition or results of operations. In addition, Ovintiv maintains insurance coverage for insurable risks against certain environmental and occupational health and safety risks that is consistent with insurance coverage held by other similarly situated industry participants, but the Company is not fully insured against all such risks. However, it is possible that developments, such as new or more stringently applied existing laws and regulations as well as claims for damages to property or persons resulting from the Company’s operations, could result in substantial costs and liabilities to the Company. As a result, Ovintiv is unable to predict with any reasonable degree of certainty future exposures concerning such matters.

 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

 

The Company’s Executive Officers are set out in the table below:

Name

Age (1)

Years Served

as Executive Officer (2)

Corporate Office

 

 

 

 

Brendan M. McCracken

46

3

President & Chief Executive Officer

Corey D. Code

48

3

Executive Vice-President & Chief Financial Officer

Gregory D. Givens

48

3

Executive Vice-President & Chief Operating Officer

Rachel M. Moore

50

2

Executive Vice-President, Corporate Services

Renee E. Zemljak

57

12

Executive Vice-President, Midstream, Marketing & Fundamentals

 

(1)

As of February 18, 2022.

(2)

Includes the years served as executive officer of Encana.

 

Mr. McCracken was appointed President & Chief Executive Officer in August 2021. Mr. McCracken joined one of the Company’s predecessor companies in 1997 and assumed a variety of leadership roles, including his previous positions as President in December 2020, Executive Vice-President, Corporate Development & External Affairs in September 2019 and Vice-President & General Manager of Canadian Operations in 2017.

Mr. Code was appointed Executive Vice-President & Chief Financial Officer of the Company in May 2019. Mr. Code joined one of the Company’s predecessor companies in 1999 and assumed a variety of leadership roles, including his previous position as Vice-President, Investor Relations and Strategy in 2018, Vice-President, Investor Relations in 2017, and Treasurer and Vice President, Portfolio Management in 2013.

 

Mr. Givens was appointed Executive Vice-President & Chief Operating Officer of the Company in September 2019. Mr. Givens joined the Company in 2018 serving as Vice-President and General Manager of Texas Operations. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Givens was Vice-President Eagle Ford of EP Energy (a public oil and natural gas company) from 2012 to 2017 and worked in various technical and leadership roles from 1996 onwards for El Paso Exploration & Production Company and Sonat Exploration Company which were predecessor companies to EP Energy.

 

Ms. Moore was appointed Executive Vice-President, Corporate Services of the Company in June 2020. Ms. Moore joined the Company in 2015 serving as Vice-President, Human Resources. Prior to joining the Company, Ms. Moore was Executive Vice-President, Human Resources of Savanna Energy Services Corporation (a privately held oil and natural gas services company) from 2010 to 2015 and was Vice President, Human Resources of Enerflex Ltd. (a public oil and natural gas services company) from 2003 to 2010.

 

Ms. Zemljak was appointed Executive Vice-President, Midstream, Marketing & Fundamentals of the Company in November 2009. Ms. Zemljak joined one of the Company’s predecessor companies in 2000 and assumed a variety of leadership roles, including her previous position as Vice-President of USA Marketing in 2002. Prior to joining the Company, Ms. Zemljak worked in various roles for Montana Power (formerly a public power company).

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ITEM 1A. Risk Factors

 

Our business and operations, and our industry in general, are subject to a variety of risks. If any event arising from the risk factors set forth below occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, the trading prices of our securities and in some cases our reputation could be materially and adversely affected. When assessing the materiality of the foregoing risk factors, we consider several qualitative and quantitative factors, including, but not limited to, financial, operational, environmental, regulatory, reputational and safety aspects of the identified risk factor. The risks described below may not be the only risks we face, as our business, operations and industry may also be subject to risks that we do not yet know of, or that we currently believe are immaterial.

 

Market Risks

 

A substantial or extended decline in oil, NGLs or natural gas prices, or a substantial increase in oil, NGLs and natural gas price differentials, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and the trading prices of our securities.

 

Our financial performance and condition are substantially dependent on the prevailing prices we receive for the oil, NGLs and natural gas which we produce. Prices for oil, NGLs and natural gas are inherently volatile and fluctuate in response to changes in a variety of factors beyond our control, including:

 

 

the international and domestic supply and demand for oil, NGLs and natural gas;

 

volatility and trading patterns in the commodity futures market;

 

global economic conditions;

 

production levels of members of OPEC, Russia, the United States or other hydrocarbon producing nations;

 

geopolitical risks, including political and civil unrest in oil and natural gas producing regions;

 

adverse weather conditions, natural disasters and other catastrophic events, such as tornadoes, flooding, severe heat or cold, earthquakes and hurricanes;

 

the price and level of North American oil, NGLs and natural gas imports and exports;

 

the level of global oil, NGLs and natural gas inventories;

 

the economic and financial impact of epidemics or other public health issues, such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic;

 

differing quality of production, including the gravity and sulphur content of our oil, the Btu and sulphur content of our natural gas, and the quantity of NGLs associated with our natural gas;

 

the price and availability of, and demand for, alternative sources of energy (including coal, nuclear, hydroelectric, solar and wind);

 

the effect of energy conservation efforts and technological advances in energy consumption and production, including with respect to transportation and power generation;

 

the availability and proximity of gathering, transportation, processing, refining, storage and other infrastructure facilities;

 

changes in trade relations and policies, including the imposition of tariffs by the United States or Canada;

 

conservation and environmental protection efforts, including activities by non-governmental organizations to restrict the exploration, development and production of oil, NGLs and natural gas; and

 

the nature and extent of governmental regulations, including any changes or other actions with respect to emissions, climate change, tariffs or tax laws.

 

We also may receive discounted prices for our oil, NGLs and natural gas production relative to certain benchmark prices (such as Brent and WTI for oil and Henry Hub and AECO for natural gas) due to constraints on our ability to transport and sell such production to certain markets. A failure to resolve such regional pricing differentials may result in our continued realization of discounted or reduced oil, NGLs and natural gas prices relative to such benchmarks.

 

A substantial or extended decline in oil, NGLs and natural gas prices, or a substantial increase in oil, NGLs and natural gas price differentials with respect to certain benchmarks, could result in, among other things, (a) a delay or cancellation of existing or future drilling, development or construction programs; (b) the curtailment or shut-in of production at some or all of our properties; (c) unutilized long-term transportation and drilling commitments; or (d) a decrease in the value of our oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and the trading prices of our securities. Additionally,

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on at least an annual basis, we assess the carrying value of our oil and natural gas properties in accordance with applicable accounting standards. If oil, NGLs and natural gas prices decline significantly for a sufficient period, the carrying value of our properties could be subject to financial impairment, and our net earnings could be materially and adversely affected.

 

A pandemic, epidemic or other widespread outbreak of an infectious disease, such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, could materially and adversely affect the operation of our business.

 

Although we maintain contingency plans to manage the potential workplace impacts of a pandemic, epidemic or other widespread outbreak of an infectious disease, such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, restrictive measures implemented by governments in the jurisdictions in which we operate could prevent our employees, contractors or suppliers from accessing our properties or performing critical services. Such measures may include limitations or prohibitions on cross-border travel, restrictions on large gatherings, stay-at-home orders, vaccine mandates and mandatory closures of “non-essential” businesses. In the event such measures remain in place for an extended period of time, our ability to maintain ordinary staffing levels, secure operational inputs, and execute on portions of our business could be impacted, and if a significant subset of our employees are required to work remotely, we will face an increased exposure to vulnerabilities related to digital technologies and may experience a higher rate of cyber-attacks. Additionally, concerns over the prolonged negative effects of a pandemic, epidemic or other widespread outbreak of an infectious disease, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, on global economic and business prospects may contribute to decreased demand for oil, NGLs and natural gas; increased volatility in capital and commodity markets, including volatility in the prices of oil, NGLs and natural gas; substantial fluctuations in currency exchange rates, inflation rates and interest rates; increased counterparty credit and performance risk; and reduced levels of general investing and consumption.  

 

While the full impact of a pandemic, epidemic or other widespread outbreak of an infectious disease, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, is inherently uncertain, the ultimate impact will depend on several factors, including the location and severity of the virus's spread, the effectiveness and adoption rate of vaccines, the emergence of new or previously unknown variants and the effectiveness of mitigation actions taken by governmental authorities. Any pandemic, epidemic or other widespread outbreak of an infectious disease, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, may reduce our spending and operating plans; reduce the value and amount of our oil, NGLs or natural gas reserves and production; cause substantial fluctuations in our stock price and credit ratings; or otherwise materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and access to liquidity.

 

The trading price of our securities, including our common stock, is subject to volatility.

 

The trading price of our securities, including our common stock, may be volatile. The value of an investment in our securities may decrease or increase abruptly, and such volatility may bear little or no relation to our financial or operational performance. The price of our securities may fall in response to market appraisal of our strategy or if our results of operations and/or prospects are below the expectations of market analysts or stakeholders. In addition, equity and debt markets have, from time to time, experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that have affected the market price of securities, and may, in the future, experience similar fluctuations which may be unrelated to our operating performance and prospects but nevertheless affect the price of our securities. Broad equity and debt market fluctuations resulting from general economic conditions, as well as our ability to meet or exceed market expectations, may materially and adversely affect the trading prices of our securities, including our common stock.

 

Fluctuations in exchange rates could affect expenses or result in realized and unrealized losses.

 

We currently have operations in Canada and, as a result, a portion of our revenues and expenses are denominated in Canadian dollars. In addition, our subsidiaries that are domiciled in Canada may hold U.S. dollar denominated assets and liabilities. Fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the Canadian dollar may result in realized and unrealized losses, which could impact our revenue and expenses and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Operational Risks

 

Our ability to operate and complete projects is dependent on numerous factors outside of our control.

 

We undertake a variety of projects including exploration and development projects and the construction or expansion of facilities and pipelines. Our ability to operate, generate sufficient cash flows, and timely complete projects depends upon numerous factors largely beyond our control. These factors include:

 

 

oil, NGLs and natural gas prices;

 

global supply and demand for oil, NGLs and natural gas;

 

the overall state of the financial markets, including investor appetite for debt and equity securities issued by oil and natural gas companies and the effects of economic recessions or depressions;

 

the ability to secure and maintain financing on acceptable terms;

 

legislative, environmental and regulatory matters;

 

oil and natural gas reservoir quality;

 

the availability of drilling rigs, completions equipment and other facilities and equipment;

 

the ability to access lands;

 

the ability to access water for hydraulic fracturing operations;

 

reliance on vendors, suppliers, contractors and service providers;

 

shortages of sufficiently skilled labor, or labor disagreements resulting in unplanned work stoppages;

 

changes to free trade agreements;

 

inflation and other unexpected cost increases, including with respect to materials and labor;

 

prevailing interest and foreign exchange rates;

 

royalty and tax rates;

 

physical impacts from adverse weather conditions and natural disasters;

 

transportation and processing interruptions or constraints, including the availability and proximity of pipeline and processing capacity;

 

technology failures; and

 

accidents.

 

In addition, part of our corporate strategy is focused on a limited number of Core Assets which results in a concentration of development capital and production. Some of the foregoing risks may be magnified due to the concentrated nature of our development activities and may result in a relatively greater impact on our financial condition and results of operations compared to other companies that may have more geographically diversified operations. Any material delays in a project or project cost overruns could result in delayed revenues and some projects becoming uneconomic, each of which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our operations involve many risks, some of which could result in unforeseen interruptions and expose us to substantial losses and liabilities, for which our insurance may not fully protect us.

 

Our business is subject to the operating risks normally associated with (a) the exploration, development and production of oil, NGLs and natural gas and (b) the operation of midstream facilities, including the gathering, transportation, processing, storing and marketing of oil, NGLs and natural gas. These risks include:

 

 

blowouts, cratering, explosions and fires;

 

loss of well control;

 

environmental hazards, such as the uncontrollable release or spill of oil, natural gas, toxic gases (such as hydrogen sulfide), produced water (brine), drilling or completion fluids, or other pollutants into the environment, including the surface, subsurface, air and groundwater;

 

pipeline ruptures, vessel ruptures and other equipment malfunctions, failures or accidents;

 

mechanical difficulties, such as stuck oilfield drilling and service tools, pipe or cement failures and casing collapses;

 

adverse weather conditions, such as severe heat or cold, flooding, tornados and other natural disasters;

 

encountering unexpected or abnormally pressured formations;

 

premature declines of reservoir pressure or productivity; and

 

acts of vandalism and terrorism, including attacks targeting oil, NGLs and natural gas facilities and infrastructure.

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If any of the foregoing risks were to materialize, we could sustain material losses as a result of:

 

 

injury or loss of life;

 

damage to, or destruction of, property, natural resources or equipment, including the costs of repair or replacement;

 

pollution or other environmental harm, including the costs associated with remediation, reclamation and plugging and abandonment;

 

interruptions to our ongoing operations, including the reduction or shutting-in of existing production;

 

regulatory investigations and administrative, civil and criminal penalties; and

 

injunctions resulting in limitation or suspension of current or future operations.

 

While we maintain insurance against some, but not all, of these risks and losses described above, our insurance may not be adequate to cover all casualty losses or liabilities, and our insurance does not cover penalties or fines that may be assessed by a governmental authority. The occurrence of a significant event for which we are not fully insured may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations.

 

Oil and natural gas exploration, development and production activities involve substantial costs and risks and may not result in commercially productive reserves.

 

Oil and natural gas exploration, development and production activities involve numerous risks, including the risk that no commercially productive oil or natural gas reservoirs will be encountered. The cost of drilling and completing wells is often uncertain and operations may be curtailed, delayed or canceled, or become costlier, as a result of a variety of factors, including:

 

 

unexpected drilling conditions, including abnormal pressures or irregularities in formations;

 

equipment failures or accidents;

 

construction delays;

 

fracture stimulation accidents or failures;

 

adverse weather conditions or natural disasters;

 

title defects or restricted access to land;

 

lack of available gathering, transportation, processing, fractionation, storage, refining or export facilities;

 

lack of available capacity on interconnecting transmission pipelines;

 

access to, and the cost and availability of, the equipment, services, resources and personnel required to complete our drilling, completion and production activities; and

 

delays imposed by or resulting from compliance with or changes in environmental and other governmental, regulatory or contractual requirements.

 

Additionally, our operations involve utilizing some of the latest horizontal drilling and completion techniques as developed internally and by our service providers. Risks that we face while drilling and completing horizontal oil and natural gas wells include the following:

 

 

landing the wellbore in the desired zone within the target formation;

 

staying in the desired zone within the target formation while drilling horizontally for extended lengths;

 

controlling formation pressures during drilling;

 

running casing the entire length of the wellbore;

 

being able to run tools and other equipment consistently through the horizontal wellbore;

 

the ability to effectively fracture stimulate the reservoir with the desired number of stages; and

 

the ability to successfully clean out the wellbore after completion of the final fracture stimulation stage.

 

Our future exploration and development activities may not be successful as a result of, among other things, the risks set forth above and, if unsuccessful, our proved oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and production would decline, which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation. While all development activities involve these risks, exploratory and extension development activities involve a greater risk of dry holes or failure to find commercial quantities of hydrocarbons.

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The proved reserves data provided in this Annual Report on Form 10-K is an estimate only and any inaccuracies in the methodology or assumptions underlying our proved reserves estimates could cause the quantity and net present value of our oil, NGLs, and natural gas reserves to be materially overstated or understated.

 

There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating economically recoverable quantities of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves, including many factors beyond our control. All oil, NGLs and natural gas reserve estimates are uncertain to some degree, and classifications of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves are only attempts to define the degree of uncertainty involved. For those reasons, estimates of the quantity of oil, NGLs and natural gas economically recoverable from a group of properties and the classification of such oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves, when prepared by different engineers or by the same engineers at different times, may vary substantially. Additionally, estimates with respect to oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves are often based upon volumetric calculations and upon analogy to similar types of reserves, rather than upon actual production history. Oil, NGLs and natural gas reserve estimates based on these methods are generally less reliable than those based on actual production history. Subsequent evaluation of the same reserves based upon production history will result in variations in the estimated reserves and these variations may be material.

 

Proved reserves data in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and other publications we make publicly available represent estimates only. In general, estimates of our oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves, and the future net cash flows therefrom, are based upon a number of factors and assumptions, including commodity prices, future operating and capital costs, availability of future capital, historical production from the same or similar properties and the assumed effects of regulation by governmental agencies, including with respect to royalty payments, all of which may vary considerably from actual results. Our actual production, revenues, taxes and development and operating expenditures with respect to our proved reserves may vary materially from such estimates.

 

The estimates of proved reserves included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are prepared in accordance with SEC regulations. Subject to limited exceptions, oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves may only be classified as proved undeveloped reserves if the wells developing such reserves are scheduled to be drilled within five years after the date of classification. The development timing of our oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves is based upon numerous expectations and assumptions, including the allocation of development capital; anticipated costs to drill, complete and operate our wells; and anticipated commodity prices. Our development expectations and assumptions are subject to change and proved undeveloped reserves may be reclassified to unproved reserves at any time. Additionally, commodity prices used to estimate proved reserves included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are calculated as the unweighted arithmetic average of the price on the first day of each month within the 12-month period. Significant future price changes can have a material effect on the quantity and value of our proved reserves. The standardized measure of discounted future net cash flows included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K will not represent the current market value of our estimated proved reserves. In addition, these proved reserve estimates do not include any value for probable or possible reserves that may exist, nor do they include any value for unproved undeveloped acreage.

If we fail to find, develop or acquire additional oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves, our reserves and production will decline materially from their current levels.

 

Our future oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and production, and therefore our future cash flows, are highly dependent upon our success in developing our current reserves base and exploring for, developing or acquiring additional oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves. Typically, to maintain an oil and natural gas lease in the United States, we are required to drill at least one well that is commercially productive within the primary term of the lease and, once drilled, maintain oil or natural gas production in paying quantities from the lease. If we are unsuccessful in drilling a commercially productive well during the primary term of the lease or, once drilled, in maintaining oil or natural gas production in paying quantities from the lease, we could lose our rights to explore for and develop oil and natural gas under such lease and our right to any oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves associated with the lease. In some cases, the initial commercially productive well will only maintain the lease as to a portion of the lands covered thereby and further oil and natural gas development activities are required to maintain the entirety of the lease.

 

The business of exploring for, developing and acquiring oil and natural gas reserves is capital intensive. Acquisition opportunities in the oil and natural gas industry are inherently competitive, which can increase the cost of, or cause us to refrain from, completing acquisitions. To the extent that cash flows from our operations are insufficient and external sources of capital become limited or undesirable, our ability to make the necessary capital investments to

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maintain and expand our oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and production will be impaired. In addition, there can be no certainty that we will be able to find, develop or acquire additional oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves to replace current reserves and production at acceptable costs. Without additions through exploration, development or acquisition activities, our oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and production will decline over time as the reserves are depleted, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Horizontal multi-well pad drilling involves certain risks which may cause volatility in our operating results.

 

Our operations utilize horizontal multi-well pad drilling. In this type of development, multiple wells are drilled based upon spacing and completions techniques that evolve over time as learnings are captured and applied. Wells drilled on a multi-well pad are generally not placed on production until all wells on the pad are drilled and completed. While the use of this development technique can accelerate the production of our oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves and increase our observed recovery factor from the reservoir, it can also result in production delays as problems with a single well can adversely affect the production of all wells on the pad. Additionally, horizontal multi-well pad drilling increases the risk of unintentional communication or pressure interference between wells which may adversely affect our production. As a result, multi-well pad drilling can both cause delays in our production schedule and result in oil, NGLs and natural gas production below expectations. These delays or production interruptions may reduce our anticipated production volumes from both new and existing wells and this volatility could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are subject to both known and unknown risks and liabilities from acquisitions and any anticipated or desired benefits from such acquisitions may not be realized.

 

Historically, acquisitions of oil and natural gas properties, including through acreage trades, farm-ins and asset- or corporate-level acquisitions, have contributed to our growth. Acquisition opportunities in the oil and natural gas industry are inherently competitive, which can increase the cost of, or cause us to refrain from, completing acquisitions. The success of any acquisition will depend on several factors and involves potential risks and uncertainties, including, among other things:

 

 

the inability to accurately forecast and estimate oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves, production volumes, development costs and the net cash flows attributable to such properties;

 

the inability to accurately forecast commodity prices;

 

the assumption of unknown liabilities, including environmental liabilities, for which we may not be indemnified or for which the indemnity may not be adequate;

 

the validity of assumptions about asset- and corporate-level synergies;

 

the effect on our liquidity or financial leverage when using available cash or debt to finance the acquisition or from the amount of debt assumed as part of the acquisition;

 

the diversion of management's attention from other business concerns; and

 

the inability to hire, train or retain qualified personnel to manage and operate the acquired assets or business.

 

All of these factors, among others, affect whether an acquisition will ultimately generate cash flows sufficient to provide a suitable return on investment. Even though we assess and review the properties we seek to acquire in a manner consistent with what we believe to be industry practice, such reviews are limited in scope, inexact and not capable of identifying all existing or potentially adverse conditions. This risk is magnified when the acquired properties are in a geographic area where we have not historically operated. As a result, the anticipated and desired benefits of an acquisition may not materialize, and this may have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial performance and results of operations.

 

We are dependent on partners to fund certain projects conducted through joint ventures and partnerships.

 

Some of our projects are conducted through joint ventures, partnerships or other arrangements, where we are dependent on our partners to fund their contractual share of the project’s capital and operating expenditures. If our partners do not approve their contractual share of capital or operating expenditures, are unable to fulfill their contractual obligations, or suspend or terminate their contractual arrangements with us, the projects may become delayed or we may be forced to absorb additional capital or operating expenditures, each of which may materially and adversely affect the viability of such projects and our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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These partners may also have strategic plans, objectives and interests that do not coincide, and may conflict, with our plans, objectives and interests. While certain operational decisions may be made solely at our discretion in our capacity as the operator of certain projects, major capital and strategic decisions affecting such projects may require agreement among the partners. While we generally seek consensus with our partners regarding major decisions concerning the direction and operation of a project, no assurance can be provided that future demands or expectations of any party, including our demands and expectations, relating to such project will be met satisfactorily or in a timely manner. Failure to satisfactorily meet such demands or expectations may affect our or our partners’ participation in the operation of such project or the timing for undertaking various activities, which could materially and adversely affect the viability of such project and our business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, we are involved from time to time in disputes with our partners and, as such, we may be unable to dispose of certain assets or interests in certain arrangements if such disputes cannot be resolved in a satisfactory or timely manner.

 

We do not operate all of our assets, and, in such instances, we may have a limited ability to exercise influence over the operation and development of such assets.

 

Third parties operate a portion of the assets in which we have an ownership interest, and, in such instances, we may have a limited ability to exercise influence over the operation and development of such assets. The success and timing of our activities on these assets is therefore dependent upon factors that are largely outside of our control. These factors include (a) the timing and amount of capital, operating and maintenance expenditures related to the project; (b) the third-party operator’s expertise and financial resources; (c) the third-party operator’s ability to obtain required approvals from other non-operating partners; and (d) the third-party operator’s selection and implementation of adequate technology and risk management practices. The failure of one or more third-party operators to effectively and efficiently operate assets in which we have an ownership interest could result in the inefficient deployment of capital and the loss of production volumes, each of which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our customers, counterparties and lenders may be unable to satisfy their contractual or legal obligations.

 

We are exposed to certain risks associated with our customers, contractual counterparties and lenders. These risks include (a) credit risks associated with (i) customers who purchase our oil, NGLs and natural gas production, (ii) the collection of receivables from our joint interest partners for their proportionate share of expenditures made on projects we operate, and (iii) counterparties to our derivative financial contracts; (b) performance risks associated with the non-delivery, or delayed delivery, of contracted products or services, including the transportation and processing of our oil, NGLs and natural gas production; and (c) liquidity risk in the event one or more lenders under our existing credit facilities are unable to perform their funding obligations. We utilize a variety of mechanisms to limit our exposure to these and similar risks, including requiring letters of credit, prepayments or collateral postings under certain conditions. Despite these mechanisms, in the event a customer, contractual counterparty or lender fails to satisfy their obligations, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

We retain certain indemnification obligations related to our corporate reorganization in November of 2009.

 

As part of our November 2009 corporate reorganization that split our predecessor, Encana, into two independent publicly traded energy companies, Encana and Cenovus Energy Inc. (“Cenovus”), Encana and Cenovus each agreed to indemnify the other for certain liabilities and obligations associated with, among other things, in the case of Encana’s indemnity, the business and assets retained by Encana, and in the case of Cenovus’s indemnity, the business and assets transferred to Cenovus. We are unable to predict whether we will be required to indemnify, or seek indemnity from, Cenovus for any obligations and the magnitude of such obligations. Any indemnification claims against us pursuant to the various agreements entered with Cenovus, or our failure to obtain indemnity from Cenovus for any claims we may hold, could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We may be unable to dispose of certain assets and may be required to retain liabilities for certain matters.

 

We may identify certain assets for disposition, the proceeds of which could reduce the amount of our existing indebtedness and/or increase the amount of capital available for other business purposes, including shareholder returns and acquisitions. Various factors could materially affect our ability to dispose of the identified assets or complete any announced transactions, including commodity price volatility; the availability of counterparties willing to acquire oil and natural gas assets at prices and on terms acceptable to us; approval by our Board of Directors; associated asset retirement obligations; due diligence; general market conditions; the assignability of any associated contract, joint venture, partnership or other arrangements; and required stock exchange, governmental or third party approvals.

These factors may also reduce the value of our assets or the proceeds of any asset disposition.

We (including our predecessor entities) have retained, or in the future may retain, liabilities or indemnification obligations in connection with certain asset dispositions. While we are unable to predict the magnitude of any retained liabilities or indemnification obligations, any liabilities or indemnification obligations retained could ultimately be material. For example, under state and federal law, once an oil or natural gas well has permanently ceased production of oil or natural gas, the operator of such well is obligated to plug and abandon (“P&A”) the well, decommission production facilities and restore the well site to pre-operating conditions. U.S. state and federal regulations allow the government to call upon predecessors in interest of oil and natural gas leases associated with such well to pay for P&A, decommissioning and restoration obligations (together, “P&A Obligations”) if the current operator fails to fulfill those obligations. If purchasers of any assets previously owned by us or our predecessors (including any offshore wells or facilities), or any successor owners of those assets, are unable to meet their P&A Obligations due to bankruptcy, dissolution or other liquidity issues, we may be unable to rely on our arrangements with them, if any, to fulfill (or provide reimbursement for) those obligations. In those circumstances, the government may seek to impose the bankrupt entity’s P&A Obligations on us and any other predecessors in interest, and such payments could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Further, certain third parties may be unwilling to release us from guarantees or other credit support provided prior to the disposition of an asset. In those cases, after the asset disposition, we may remain secondarily liable for the obligations guaranteed or supported to the extent that the acquirer of the assets fails to perform their obligations.

 

Our operations may be affected by indigenous treaty, title and other rights.

 

Indigenous peoples have claimed indigenous treaty, title and other rights in respect of areas within the United States and Canada. The legal basis of an indigenous land claim is a matter of considerable legal complexity and we cannot predict the impact of such a claim, or the possible effects of a settlement of such claim, with any degree of certainty. In addition, no assurance can be given that any recognition of indigenous rights or claims whether by way of a negotiated settlement or by judicial pronouncement (or through the grant of an injunction prohibiting exploration, development or production activities pending resolution of any such claim) would not delay or even prevent our exploration, development and production activities. If a material claim were to arise and be successful, such claim could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the process of addressing such claim, regardless of the outcome, could be expensive and time consuming and could result in delays which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. For more information on the ongoing BRFN Case refer to Government and Environmental Regulatory Matters under Item 1 and 2 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In addition to the foregoing, we may become subject to various laws and regulations that apply to operators and other parties operating within the boundaries of Native American reservations in the United States. These laws and regulations may result in the imposition of certain fees, taxes, environmental standards, lease conditions or requirements to employ specified contractors or service providers. Any one of these requirements, or any delay in obtaining the approvals or permits necessary to operate within the boundaries of Native American tribal lands, could adversely impact our operations and ability to explore, develop and produce new properties.

 

Further, in Canada, the province of British Columbia enacted legislation to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (“UNDRIP”) in the fall of 2019 and the Canadian federal government has followed suit by adopting the UNDRIP Act on June 21, 2021. The UNDRIP legislation adopted by

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both British Columbia and the Canadian federal government  provide frameworks for recognizing the constitutional and human rights of indigenous peoples and aligning their respective provincial and federal laws with the internationally recognized standards of UNDRIP. Both pieces of UNDRIP legislation are at an early stage of implementation and we are unable to predict the total impact of the potential regulations upon our business. Although we do not anticipate any near-term impacts to our business as a result of such legislation, the implementation of the standards of UNDRIP has the potential to increase permitting times and change the processes and costs associated with project development and operations.

 

Environmental Risks and Risks Associated with Climate Change

 

We are subject to risks and uncertainties associated with increased Environmental Regulation in all jurisdictions in which we operate.

 

Our operations and properties are subject to numerous existing laws, rules and regulations governing our interactions with the environment that are enacted by U.S. and Canadian federal, state, provincial, territorial, tribal, and municipal governments (collectively, “Environmental Regulations”). Environmental Regulations impose, among other things, restrictions, liabilities and obligations in connection with (a) discharges and emissions of various substances into the environment; (b) the hydraulic fracturing of wells; (c) the handling, use, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal of chemicals, hazardous substances and waste associated with finding, producing, transmitting and storing oil, NGLs and natural gas; (d) the availability and management of fresh, potable or brackish water sources that are being used, or whose use is contemplated, in oil and natural gas operations; and (e) requirements that well sites and other properties associated with our operations be constructed, operated, maintained, abandoned and reclaimed to the satisfaction of applicable regulatory authorities. In addition, certain types of operations, including new exploration and development projects and certain changes to existing exploration and development projects, may require the submission and approval of environmental impact assessments or permit applications. Expenditures required to institute and maintain compliance with new or existing Environmental Regulations can be significant. Failure to comply with Environmental Regulations may result in substantial clean-up and remediation costs arising from damaged or contaminated properties, the imposition of significant fines and penalties by regulators and costly litigation or administrative proceedings. Examples of recently proposed and final Environmental Regulations or other regulatory initiatives include the following:

 

Emissions - Greenhouse gases (which include, among other things, methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and various fluorinated gases; “GHGs”) are typically emitted throughout all phases of the oil and natural gas supply chain, including production, transportation, processing, refining and storage operations. Additionally, although beyond our control, end user consumption of oil and natural gas in activities such as power generation and motorized transportation also results in GHG emissions. In the United States, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (the “EPA”) has determined that GHG emissions present a danger to public health and the environment and has adopted Environmental Regulations that, among other things, restrict GHG emissions and require the monitoring and annual reporting of GHG emissions from specified sources. For example, in November 2021, the EPA proposed New Source Performance Standard Subpart OOOOb that seeks to impose more stringent methane and volatile organic compound emission standards for new, reconstructed, and modified sources in the oil and natural gas industry. The EPA also proposed New Source Performance Standard Subpart OOOOc, which would create, for the first-time, emission guidelines for existing oil and natural gas sources to be included in individual states’ implementation plans. These Subpart OOOOb and OOOOc standards expand upon previously issued New Source Performance Standards, Subpart OOOO and Subpart OOOOa published by the EPA in 2012 and 2016, respectively. In addition, policy makers at both the federal and state levels continue to propose more stringent Environmental Regulations designed to further limit GHG and other air emissions. Many state and local officials have stated their intent to intensify efforts to regulate GHG and other air emissions, including methane, from the oil and natural gas industry and it is anticipated that the Biden Administration will propose additional Environmental Regulations that may impose new costs on the oil and natural gas industry in an effort to accelerate reductions of GHG and other air emissions from both the production and consumption of energy.

 

The U.S. and Canadian federal governments, along with several provincial and state governments, have also announced intentions to adhere to certain international protocols regarding GHG emissions and regulate GHGs and certain air pollutants. In addition to federal action, many state, provincial and local

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officials have stated their intent to intensify efforts to regulate GHG emissions, including methane, from the oil and natural gas industry. These governments are currently developing and/or implementing regulatory and policy frameworks to deliver on their announcements. For example, effective February 19, 2021, the United States officially rejoined the Paris Agreement, an international accord to address climate change through voluntary and non-binding commitments to reduce GHG emissions by signatory nations. Pursuant to its pledge under the Paris Agreement, the United States has committed to reducing its net GHG emissions by 50-52 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. In Canada, the Government of Canada (a) has committed to cutting Canada’s net GHG emissions by 40-45 percent below 2005 levels by 2030 in accordance with its pledge under the Paris Agreement; (b) is gradually raising the federal carbon tax to C$170/tonne CO2e by 2030; and (c) has announced its intention to impose a hard cap on GHG emissions from the oil and natural gas industry, seeking to reduce methane emissions from the oil and natural gas industry by 75 percent below 2012 levels by 2030 and ensure GHG emission reductions are on a pace and scale sufficient to reach net-zero by 2050. We actively participate in certain provincial industrial emission programs offered by both Alberta and British Columbia that allow for the generation of offsets and other rebates to incentivize emission reduction projects and mitigate carbon tax costs. We expect to continue to be able to utilize these provincial programs in the future to migrate our carbon tax costs.

 

Hydraulic Fracturing Operations - The U.S. and Canadian federal governments, along with certain U.S. state and Canadian provincial governments, continue to review aspects of the scientific, regulatory and policy framework under which hydraulic fracturing operations are conducted. Most of these governments are primarily engaged in the collection, review and assessment of technical information regarding the hydraulic fracturing process and have not provided specific details with respect to any significant actual, proposed or contemplated changes to the hydraulic fracturing regulatory construct. However, certain environmental and other groups have made claims that hydraulic fracturing techniques are harmful to surface water and drinking water sources and continue to suggest that additional Environmental Regulations may be needed to more closely regulate the hydraulic fracturing process. Further, certain governments in jurisdictions where we do not currently operate have considered or implemented moratoriums on hydraulic fracturing until further studies can be completed and some governments have adopted, and others have considered adopting, Environmental Regulations that could impose more stringent permitting, disclosure and well construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations or result in an outright ban of hydraulic fracturing in oil and natural gas operations.

 

Seismic Activity - Some areas of North America are experiencing an increased frequency of localized seismic activity which has been associated with oil and natural gas operations. Although the occurrence and risk of seismicity in relation to oil and natural gas operations is generally very low, it has been linked to the underground disposal of produced water and, in some instances, has been correlated with hydraulic fracturing activities. This has prompted legislative and regulatory initiatives intended to address these concerns. These initiatives have the potential to (a) require additional seismic monitoring; (b) restrict the volume of produced water injected in certain disposal wells; (c) restrict the injection of produced water in certain underground formations; and (d) modify or curtail hydraulic fracturing operations in certain areas.

 

The cost and effects of complying with existing and emerging Environmental Regulations (including those with respect to emissions, hydraulic fracturing operations and seismic activity) and proposed carbon taxes are not currently anticipated to be material to our operations, however federal, state, provincial and local regulations and programs are either under development or in the early stages of implementation and we are unable to accurately predict the total future impact of such regulations and programs. Increased Environmental Regulations and/or carbon taxes could (a) materially increase our cost of compliance and other operating costs; and/or (b) impede or prevent development of our oil, NGLs and natural gas assets, reducing (i) the amount of oil, NGLs and natural gas we are ultimately able to produce from our reserves and (ii) our overall quantity of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves. The occurrence of any of the foregoing could have have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We are subject to risks and uncertainties arising out of the threat of climate change that could reduce demand for the oil, NGLs and natural gas we produce; increase our operating costs; and limit the areas in which we may explore for, develop, and produce oil, NGLs and natural gas.

 

Public attention to issues concerning the existence and extent of climate change, and the role of human activity in it, continues to increase, with the oil and natural gas industry receiving heightened scrutiny regarding GHG emissions. Internationally this has resulted in existing and pending international agreements to reduce GHG emissions globally, while in Canada and the United States this has resulted in both national, regional and local legislation and regulatory programs. For example, On January 27, 2021, President Biden issued Executive Order 14008 entitled "Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad," directing the heads of various federal agencies, to the extent consistent with applicable law and in consultation with other agencies and stakeholders, to, among other things, (a) assess climate related risks to federal agencies; (b) pause the issuance of new oil and natural gas leases on public lands or in offshore waters pending completion of a comprehensive review and reconsideration of federal oil and natural gas permitting and leasing practices; (c) achieve a carbon-pollution free electricity sector by 2035; (d) procure clean and zero-emission vehicles for federal, state, local and tribal government fleets; and (e) identify and eliminate federal fossil fuel subsidies. Additionally, an increasing number of states, local municipalities and other groups have made claims in federal and state courts against oil and natural gas companies, including Ovintiv, alleging that GHG emissions from oil and natural gas produced by such companies has contributed, and continues to contribute, to climate change. These allegations have included claims of public and private nuisance, trespass, negligence, strict liability and civil conspiracy. Some in the investment community (including, among others, shareholders, bondholders, institutional lenders, investment advisors, pension and sovereign wealth funds and endowments) have also become increasing concerned with the causes of climate change and the role oil and natural gas companies play in any of its purported effects. This has led some in the investment community to shift all or part of their investment or funding allocations away from the oil and natural gas industry and others to modify the terms upon which funding is made available to the oil and natural gas industry. In other instances, it has led shareholders to initiate lawsuits against the directors and management of oil and natural gas companies and/or bring shareholder proposals demanding that oil and natural gas companies increase climate disclosure; change business practices or operations; or appoint new board representation.

 

If initiatives and actions brought by private parties or additional governmental regulations with respect to climate change intensify, we could experience (a) a reduction in demand for the oil and natural gas we produce and sell; (b) a material increase in our cost of compliance and other operating costs; (c) difficulty in developing our oil and natural gas assets, reducing (i) the amount of oil, NGLs and natural gas we are ultimately able to produce from our reserves and (ii) our overall quantity of oil, NGLs and natural gas reserves; (d) limitations on our ability to access capital markets and raise capital on satisfactory terms, or at all; and (e) costly and time consuming litigation. While we are unable to accurately assess the probability and impact of potential climate change regulations, initiatives and actions, the occurrence of any one or more of the foregoing could have have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Financial and Liquidity Risk

Downgrades in our credit ratings could increase our cost of capital and limit our access to capital, suppliers or counterparties.

 

Rating agencies regularly evaluate our credit, basing their credit ratings for our long-term and short-term debt securities on a variety of factors, including factors over which we have some control (e.g., our financial strength), as well as factors not entirely within our control (e.g., general macroeconomic trends and conditions affecting the oil and natural gas industry generally). While we currently hold investment grade credit ratings from three of the four major rating agencies, there is no assurance that our credit ratings will not be downgraded in the future, including below investment grade.

 

Our borrowing costs and ability to raise funds are directly impacted by our credit ratings. A credit rating downgrade may increase the cost of borrowing under our existing credit facilities, limit access to our current commercial paper programs, limit our access to private and public markets to raise short-term and long-term debt capital, and negatively impact our overall cost of capital. Credit ratings may also be important to suppliers or counterparties when they seek to engage in certain transactions. If we experience downgrades in one or more of our credit ratings, we may be required to post collateral, letters of credit, cash or other forms of security as financial assurance for our

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performance under certain contractual arrangements with various counterparties including marketing, midstream (including gathering, processing and transportation providers), over-the-counter derivative, and construction counterparties. Additionally, certain of these arrangements contain financial assurance language that may, under certain circumstances, permit our counterparties to request additional collateral or require that we terminate transactions based on our credit rating. The occurrence of any of the foregoing could adversely affect our ability to execute portions of our business strategy, including hedging, and could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and capital position.

 

Our level of indebtedness may limit our financial flexibility.

 

As of December 31, 2021, we had outstanding long-term unsecured senior notes of $4,741 million. The terms of our various financing arrangements, including but not limited to the indentures relating to our outstanding senior notes and the credit agreements relating to our revolving credit facilities, impose restrictions on our ability to take a number of actions that we may otherwise desire to take, including incurring additional debt (including guarantees of indebtedness) and selling or creating liens on certain assets.

 

Our level of indebtedness could affect our operations by:

 

 

requiring us to dedicate a portion of our cash flows from operations to service indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of cash flow for other purposes;

 

reducing our competitiveness compared to similar oil and natural gas companies that have less debt;

 

limiting our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital investments and acquisitions;

 

limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and industry; and

 

increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions.

 

Our ability to meet and service our debt obligations depends on our future operational performance. General economic conditions; oil, NGLs or natural gas prices; and financial, business and other factors may affect our operational performance. Many of these factors are beyond our control. If we are unable to satisfy our debt obligations with cash on hand, we may attempt to refinance or repay portions of our indebtedness, including with proceeds from a public securities offering or the sale of certain assets. No assurance can be given that we will be able to generate sufficient cash flows to pay the interest on our debt, or that funds from future borrowings, equity financings or asset sales will be available to pay or refinance our debt on terms that we consider favorable. Further, if we incur additional debt to finance asset or business acquisitions, we may decrease our liquidity by using a significant portion of our available cash or borrowing capacity to finance such acquisitions, and such acquisitions could result in a significant increase in our interest expense or financial leverage. The occurrence of any of the foregoing could adversely affect our ability to execute portions of our business strategy and could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and capital position.

Our risk management activities may prevent us from fully benefiting from an increase in oil, NGLs and natural gas prices and expose us to certain other risks.

 

We are exposed to, among other things, fluctuations in oil, NGLs and natural gas prices and foreign currency exchange rates. We actively monitor such exposures and, where we deem appropriate, utilize derivative financial instruments and physical delivery contracts to mitigate the potential impact of declines in oil, NGLs and natural gas prices and fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. Under U.S. GAAP, derivative financial instruments that do not qualify or are not designated as hedges for accounting purposes are fair valued with the resulting changes recognized in current period net earnings. The utilization of derivative financial instruments may therefore introduce significant volatility into our reported net earnings.

 

The terms of our various risk management agreements and the amount of estimated production hedged may limit the benefits we receive from an increase in oil, NGLs and natural gas prices. We may also suffer financial loss if (a) we fail to produce anticipated volumes of oil, NGLs and natural gas, particularly during periods of increasing commodity prices; or (b) counterparties to our risk management agreements fail to fulfill their obligations under the agreements, particularly during periods of declining commodity prices. The occurrence of any of the foregoing could adversely affect our ability to execute portions of our business strategy and could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and capital position.

 

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The decision to return capital to shareholders, whether through cash dividends, share buybacks or otherwise, and the amount and timing of such capital returns is subject to the discretion of the Board of Directors and will vary from time to time.

 

Although we currently intend to return capital to shareholders in the form of (a) a base quarterly cash dividend; (b) variable cash dividends; and/or (c) repurchases of our outstanding common stock (commonly known as share buybacks), the amount and timing of these returns of capital to shareholders may vary from time to time. The decision whether to return capital to shareholders, as well as the timing and amount of any return of capital to shareholders, is subject to the discretion of the Board of Directors, which regularly evaluates our proposed capital returns to shareholders and the requirements, if any, under Delaware General Corporation Law (“DGCL”). Additionally, in the case of share buybacks, we may be limited in our ability to repurchase shares of our common stock by various governmental laws, rules and regulations which prevent us from purchasing our common stock during periods when we are in possession of material non-public information. The level of dividends per share of common stock will also be affected by the number of outstanding shares of common stock and other securities that may be entitled to receive cash dividends or other payments.

The amount of cash available to return to shareholders, if any, can vary significantly from period to period for a number of reasons, including, among other things: our operational and financial performance; fluctuations in the costs to produce oil, NGLs and natural gas; the amount of cash required or retained for debt service or repayment; amounts required to fund capital expenditures and working capital requirements; our ability to access capital markets; foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates; any agreements relating to our indebtedness that restrict our ability to return capital to shareholders and the other risks set forth in Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The trading price of our securities, including our common stock, may deteriorate if we are unable to meet investor expectations with respect to the timing and amount of capital returns to shareholders, and such deterioration may be material.

 

Regulation and Litigation Risk

 

We are subject to extensive federal, state, provincial and local government laws, rules and regulations that can adversely affect the cost, manner and feasibility of our business, and increased regulation in the future could increase costs, impose additional operating restrictions and cause delays.

 

All of our operations are subject to extensive federal, state, provincial, local and other laws, rules and regulations, including with respect to drilling operations; completion operations, including the use of hydraulic fracturing; the production of oil, NGLs and natural gas; the disposal of produced water and other hazardous waste; the gathering and transportation of oil, NGLs and natural gas; the imposition of taxes; royalty payments; environmental matters, including air and water emissions or discharges; free trade agreements; worker health and safety; and conservation policies, including policies related to environmentally sensitive areas and protected species. These laws, rules and regulations may impose substantial liabilities for our failure to comply, including the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties and the issuance of injunctions restricting or prohibiting some or all of our activities in a particular area.

 

In the normal course of our business, we may be required to make large expenditures to comply with applicable governmental laws, rules, regulations, permits or orders. While we cannot predict the actions that future laws, rules and regulations may require or prohibit, our business could be subject to increased operating and other compliance costs and our operations may be delayed if existing laws, rules and regulations are revised or reinterpreted, or if new laws, rules and regulations become applicable to our operations. Any such increases or delays could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We currently are, and from time to time in the future may be, subject to claims, litigation, administrative proceedings and regulatory actions that may not be resolved in our favor.

 

We currently are, and from time to time in the future may be, subject to claims, litigation, administrative proceedings and regulatory actions. The outcome of these matters may be difficult to assess or quantify, and there cannot be any assurance that such matters will be resolved in our favor. If we are unable to resolve such matters favorably, we or our directors, officers or employees may become involved in legal proceedings that could result in an onerous or unfavorable decision, including fines, sanctions, monetary damages or the inability to engage in

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certain operations or transactions. The defence of such matters may also be costly, time consuming and could divert the attention of management and key personnel away from our operations. We may also be subject to adverse publicity associated with such matters, regardless of whether such allegations are valid or whether we are ultimately found liable. As a result, such matters could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. See Item 3 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

The ability of Canadian and other non-resident shareholders to effect service of process or enforce remedies against Ovintiv, its directors, officers, experts, and assets may be limited.

 

We are incorporated in the State of Delaware and our principal place of business is in the United States. Most of our directors and officers are residents of the United States and many of the experts who provide us with services are residents of the United States. Additionally, most of our oil and natural gas assets and production are located in the United States. It may be difficult for our shareholders in Canada or other non-U.S. jurisdictions (each a "Foreign Jurisdiction") to (a) effect service of process within such Foreign Jurisdiction upon Ovintiv or certain of our directors, officers and representatives of experts who are not residents of the Foreign Jurisdiction (together, “Non-Residents”) and (b) enforce the judgments of courts in an applicable Foreign Jurisdiction against Ovintiv and other Non-Residents based upon liability under the laws of such Foreign Jurisdiction, including the securities laws of any province within Canada.

Tax Risks

 

U.S. and Canadian tax laws and regulations may change over time, and such changes may result in increased taxes on our business.

 

From time to time, legislation has been proposed that, if enacted into law, would make significant changes to U.S. and Canadian tax laws and regulations, including those specifically applicable to the oil and natural gas industry (such as the intangible drilling and development costs deduction under U.S. federal income tax law). While we are unable to predict the timing, scope and effect of any proposed or enacted tax law changes, elimination of certain tax deductions, as well as any other changes to, or the imposition of new, federal, state or local U.S. or Canadian taxes (including the imposition of, or increases in, production, severance or similar taxes), could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We will continue to monitor and assess any proposed or enacted tax law changes to determine the impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations and take appropriate actions, where necessary.

 

Additionally, U.S. and Canadian tax authorities could detrimentally change their administrative practices or may disagree with the way we calculate our tax liabilities or structure our arrangements and there are certain tax matters under governmental review for which the timing of resolution is uncertain. While we believe that our current provision for income taxes is adequate, certain tax authorities may reassess our taxes and such reassessments may be material.

 

Our corporate reorganization in January of 2020 may result in material Canadian and/or U.S. federal income taxes.

 

On January 24, 2020, Encana completed a corporate reorganization (the “Reorganization”), which included among other things, (a) a consolidation of Encana common stock on the basis of one post-consolidation share for each five pre-consolidation shares; (b) our acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of Encana common stock in exchange for shares of Ovintiv common stock on a one-for-one basis and becoming the parent company of Encana and its subsidiaries and (c) our subsequent migration from Canada to the United States, becoming a Delaware corporation (the “U.S. Domestication”). We continue to carry on the business previously conducted by Encana and its subsidiaries prior to the completion of the Reorganization. The Reorganization and U.S. Domestication involved multiple complex U.S. and Canadian tax issues, including numerous assumptions and estimates of fair market value. While we believe that our analysis and application of both U.S. and Canadian tax laws to the Reorganization was correct, certain tax authorities may challenge our positions which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

45

 


 

 

General Risks

 

The oil and natural gas industry is highly competitive and many of our competitors have available resources in excess of our own.

 

The oil and natural gas industry is highly competitive, and many competitors, including major integrated and independent oil and natural gas companies, as well as national oil companies, are larger and have substantially greater resources at their disposal than we do. We compete with these companies for the acquisition of oil and natural gas leases and other properties. Such competition can significantly increase costs and affect the availability of resources, which could provide our larger competitors a competitive advantage when acquiring equipment, leases and other properties.

 

We also compete with these companies for the personnel, including petroleum engineers, geologists, geophysicists and other key personnel, required to both (a) find, acquire, develop and operate our properties and (b) market our oil, NGLs and natural gas production. The experience, knowledge and contributions of our existing management team and directors to our immediate and near-term operations is of central importance for the foreseeable future. As such, the unexpected loss of services from, or retirement of any, of our key operations or management personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operation. In addition, the competition for qualified personnel in the oil and natural gas industry means there can be no assurance that we will be able to attract and retain key personnel with the required specialized skills necessary for our business.

We could be adversely affected by security threats, including cyber-security threats and related disruptions.

 

We have become increasingly dependent upon information technology systems to conduct our daily operations. We depend on a variety of information technology systems to estimate oil, NGLs and natural gas reserve quantities; process and record financial and operating data; analyze seismic and drilling information; and communicate with employees and third-party partners. This growing dependence on technology is accompanied by a greater sensitivity to cyber-attacks and information systems breaches. Unauthorized access to information systems by employees or third parties could corrupt or expose confidential, fiduciary, or proprietary information; interrupt our communications or operations; disrupt our business activities; or interfere with our competitive position. In addition, our vendors, suppliers and other business partners may separately suffer disruptions as a result of such security breaches which may directly or indirectly affect our business activities or our competitive position.

 

To protect our information assets and systems, we apply technical and process controls, which are reviewed by the appropriate members of senior management with oversight from our Board of Directors. These controls are in line with industry standards and are reviewed annually with peer companies to guide our focus on information security initiatives. However, these controls may not adequately prevent cyber-security breaches and we may not adopt all controls utilized by our peers. As cyber-attacks continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources to investigate, mitigate and remediate any potential vulnerabilities. We may also be subject to regulatory investigations or litigation relating to cyber-security issues.

 

Although we have not suffered any material losses related to a cyber-security breach to date, there is no assurance that we will not suffer material losses associated with cyber-security breaches in the future. If a cyber-attack were to successfully breach our information or operating systems, we could incur substantial remediation costs and suffer other negative consequences, including exposure to significant litigation risks. The potential for such occurrences subjects our operations to increased risks that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None.

 

46

 


 

 

 

Ovintiv is involved in various legal claims and actions arising in the normal course of the Company’s operations. Although the outcome of these claims cannot be predicted with certainty, the Company does not expect these matters to have a material adverse effect on Ovintiv’s financial position, cash flows or results of operations. If an unfavorable outcome were to occur, there exists the possibility of a material impact on the Company’s consolidated net earnings or loss for the period in which the effect becomes reasonably estimable. See Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, “We currently are, and from time to time in the future may be, subject to claims, litigation, administrative proceedings and regulatory actions that may not be resolved in the Company’s favor”.

 

In July 2020, the Company received a Notice of Violation (“NOV”) from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality (“UDAQ”). The NOV alleges violations under the federal Clean Air Act, the State of Utah’s State Implementation Plan, and the State of Utah’s air quality regulations for the oil and natural gas industry, at certain of the Company facilities located in the Uinta Basin. The Company has exchanged information with the EPA and UDAQ and is engaged in discussions aimed at resolving the allegations. The Company is unable to predict the financial impact of the NOV or the timing of its resolution at this time. Resolution of the matter may result in monetary sanctions of more than $300,000.

 

For additional information, see Note 27 to Ovintiv’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

47

 


 

 

PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information

 

Ovintiv’s shares of common stock are listed and posted for trading on the NYSE and TSX under the symbol “OVV”.

 

Shareholders

 

The Company is authorized to issue up to 775,000,000 shares of stock consisting of: (a) 750,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share, and (b) 25,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.01 per share. As at February 18, 2022, there were 256,769,168 shares of common stock outstanding held by 5,230 shareholders of record, and no shares of preferred stock outstanding.

 

Capital Return Information

 

In 2021, the Company paid a quarterly dividend of $0.09375 per share for each of the first two quarters and $0.14 per share for the third and fourth quarters (2020: $0.09375 per share each quarter) and $0.4675 per share annually (2020: $0.375 per share annually). On February 24, 2022 the Board of Directors declared a dividend of $0.20 per share of Ovintiv common stock payable on March 31, 2022 to common shareholders of record as of March 15, 2022. The Company currently pays dividends quarterly to shareholders of record as of the 15th day (or the previous business day) of the last month of each calendar quarter, with the last business day of the same month being the corresponding payment date.

 

On September 9, 2021 the Company announced a new capital allocation framework commencing in the fourth quarter of 2021, where the Company is committed to return 25 percent of Non-GAAP Cash Flow in excess of capital expenditures and base dividends in the form of share buybacks and/or variable dividends at the discretion of the Board. During the fourth quarter of 2021, the Company elected share buybacks under the capital allocation framework.

 

Although we currently intend to return capital to shareholders in the form of (a) a base quarterly cash dividend; (b) variable cash dividends; and/or (c) repurchases of our outstanding common stock (commonly known as share buybacks), the amount and timing of these returns of capital to shareholders may vary from time to time. The decision whether to return capital to shareholders, as well as the timing and amount of any return of capital to shareholders, is subject to the discretion of the Board of Directors, which regularly evaluates our proposed capital returns to shareholders and the requirements, if any, under DGCL. See Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Annual Report on Form 10‑K, “The decision to return capital to shareholders, whether through cash dividends, share buybacks or otherwise, and the amount and timing of such capital returns is subject to the discretion of the Board of Directors and will vary from time to time”.

 

SECURITIES AUTHORIZED FOR ISSUANCE UNDER EQUITY COMPENSATION PLANS

 

Information concerning securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans is set forth in the Proxy Statement relating to the Company’s 2022 annual meeting of shareholders, which is incorporated herein by reference.

 

48

 


 

 

PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PERSONS

 

On September 28, 2021, Ovintiv announced it had received regulatory approval to purchase, for cancellation, up to 26 million shares of common stock pursuant to a NCIB over a 12-month period from October 1, 2021 to September 30, 2022. The number of shares of common stock authorized for purchase represents 10 percent of Ovintiv's public float as of September 20, 2021.

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2021, the Company purchased approximately 3 million shares of common stock for total consideration of approximately $111 million at a weighted average price of $36.18 per share. The following table presents the shares of common stock purchased during the three months ended December 31, 2021.

 

Period

Total Number of Shares Purchased

Average

Price Paid

per Share (1)

Total Number of Shares

Purchased as Part of Publicly

Announced Plans or Programs

Maximum Number of Shares

That May Yet be Purchased

Under the Plans or Programs

October 1 to October 31, 2021

791,392

$

37.91

791,392

25,256,869

November 1 to November 30, 2021

1,786,135

 

35.94

1,786,135

23,470,734

December 1 to December 31, 2021

490,766

 

34.23

490,766

22,979,968

Total

3,068,293

$

36.18

3,068,293

22,979,968

 

(1)

Includes commissions.

 

RECENT SALES OF UNREGISTERED EQUITY SECURITIES

 

None.

 

49

 


 

 

PERFORMANCE GRAPH

 

The following performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC, nor shall information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that the Company specifically incorporates it by reference into such filing.

The following graph compares the cumulative five-year total return to shareholders of the Company’s common stock relative to the cumulative total returns of the S&P 400 and the SPDR Oil & Gas Exploration & Production ETF (“XOP U.S. Equity”). The graph was prepared assuming $100 was invested on December 31, 2016 in the Company’s common stock, the S&P 400 and the XOP U.S. Equity, and dividends have been reinvested subsequent to the initial investment. The graph is included for historical comparative purposes only and should not be considered indicative of future performance.

 

Comparison of 5-Year Cumulative Total Return Among

Ovintiv, the S&P 400 and XOP U.S. Equity

(US$100 Invested in Base Period)

 

 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Ovintiv

$   100.00

$   114.19

$   49.82

$   41.03

$   26.75

$   63.76

S&P 400

100.00

116.23

103.33

130.37

148.16

184.81

XOP US Equity

100.00

90.53

65.10

58.95

37.54

62.61

 

Item 6. [Reserved]

 

Not Applicable.

50

 


 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The MD&A is intended to provide a narrative description of the Company’s business from management’s perspective which includes an overview of Ovintiv’s consolidated 2021 results and year-over-year comparisons between 2021 and 2020 results. This MD&A should be read in conjunction with the audited Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes for the year ended December 31, 2021 (“Consolidated Financial Statements”), which are included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Discussion and analysis of 2019 results and year-over-year comparisons between 2020 and 2019 results that are not included in this Form 10-K, and can be found in Item 7 of the 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Common industry terms and abbreviations are used throughout this MD&A and are defined in the Definitions, Conversions and Conventions sections of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This MD&A includes the following sections:

 

Executive Overview

 

Results of Operations

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Non-GAAP Measures

 

Executive Overview

Strategy

Ovintiv is a leading North American energy producer that is focused on developing its multi-basin portfolio of oil, NGLs and natural gas producing plays as part of its strategy outlined in Items 1 and 2 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Ovintiv is committed to growing long-term shareholder value by delivering on its strategic priorities through execution excellence, disciplined capital allocation, commercial acumen and risk management, while driving environmental, social and governance progress. The Company’s strategy is founded on its multi-basin portfolio of top tier assets, financial strength, as well as its core and foundational values.

In support of the Company’s commitment to growing shareholder value, Ovintiv implemented a capital allocation framework in 2021 that outlines increasing returns to shareholders as well as continuing the Company’s progress on debt reduction.

Ovintiv is delivering results in a socially and environmentally responsible manner. Thoughtfully developed best practices are deployed across its assets, allowing the Company to capitalize on operational efficiencies and decrease emissions intensity. The Company’s sustainability reporting, which outlines its key metrics and progress achieved relating to ESG practices can be found on the Company’s website.

Ovintiv continually reviews and evaluates its strategy and changing market conditions in order to maximize cash flow generation from its Core Assets located in some of the best plays in North America. As at December 31, 2021, the Core Assets comprised Permian and Anadarko in the U.S., and Montney in Canada. These Core Assets form a multi-basin portfolio of oil, NGLs and natural gas producing plays enabling flexible and efficient investment of capital that support the Company’s strategy.

Underpinning Ovintiv’s strategy are core values of one, agile, innovative and driven, which guide the organization to be collaborative, responsive, flexible and determined. The Company is committed to excellence with a passion to drive corporate financial performance and succeed as a team.

For additional information on reporting segments and the plays in which the Company operates, refer to Items 1 and 2 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. For additional information on the segmented results, refer to Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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In evaluating its operations and assessing its leverage, Ovintiv reviews performance-based measures such as Non-GAAP Cash Flow, Non-GAAP Cash Flow Margin, Total Costs and debt-based metrics such as Debt to Adjusted Capitalization, Net Debt and Net Debt to Adjusted EBITDA, which are non-GAAP measures and do not have any standardized meaning under U.S. GAAP. These measures may not be similar to measures presented by other issuers and should not be viewed as a substitute for measures reported under U.S. GAAP. Additional information regarding these measures, including reconciliations to the closest GAAP measure, can be found in the Non-GAAP Measures section of this MD&A.

Highlights

During 2021, the Company focused on executing its 2021 capital plan aimed at maximizing profitability through operational and capital efficiencies, delivering cash from operating activities and using excess cash flows to reduce total long-term debt. Higher upstream product revenues in 2021 compared to 2020 resulted from higher average realized prices, excluding the impact of risk management activities. Increases in average realized natural gas and liquids prices of 91 percent and 90 percent, respectively, were primarily due to higher benchmark prices. Ovintiv continues to focus on optimizing realized prices from the diversification of the Company’s downstream markets.

The Company continued to deliver significant cash from operating activities while reducing its total long-term debt balance. Cash from operating activities of $3,129 million included a net realized loss of $1,362 million on the settlement of commodity and foreign exchange risk management positions and a current income tax recovery of $156 million primarily due to the resolution of prior years’ tax items. The Company used excess cash flows to reduce its total long-term debt balance by $2.1 billion in 2021.

Significant Developments

 

On April 28, 2021, the Company closed the sale of its previously announced Duvernay assets and received proceeds of approximately $238 million, after closing and other adjustments. The transaction had an effective date of January 1, 2021.

 

On May 19, 2021, the Company closed the sale of its previously announced Eagle Ford assets and received proceeds of approximately $764 million, after closing and other adjustments. The transaction had an effective date of January 1, 2021.

 

On May 19, 2021, the Company announced its intention to redeem the Company’s $600 million, 5.75 percent senior notes due January 30, 2022, and its $518 million, 3.90 percent senior notes due November 15, 2021. The senior notes were redeemed on June 18, 2021 and August 16, 2021, respectively. The combined debt redemptions will result in annualized interest savings of over $50 million.

 

On July 27, 2021, Ovintiv announced an increase of about 50 percent to its quarterly dividend payment representing an annualized dividend of $0.56 per share of common stock as part of the Company’s commitment to returning capital to shareholders.

 

On September 9, 2021, Ovintiv announced a new capital allocation framework to support the Company’s strategy of increasing shareholder returns as well as reducing Net Debt.

 

On September 28, 2021, in conjunction with the new capital allocation framework, Ovintiv announced it received regulatory approval to commence a NCIB that enables the Company to purchase, for cancellation, up to approximately 26 million shares of common stock over a 12-month period from October 1, 2021 to September 30, 2022. During 2021, Ovintiv purchased for cancellation, approximately 3.1 million shares of common stock at an average price of $36.18 per share, for total consideration of approximately $111 million.

 

On October 6, 2021, Ovintiv launched its sustainability website, which highlights the Company’s progress on its key ESG metrics and initiatives, and announced several sustainability milestones related to emission reductions, social responsibility, and corporate governance. As of December 31, 2021, the Company exceeded its 33 percent methane emissions intensity reduction target, four years ahead of schedule and reduced its GHG emissions intensity by greater than 20 percent compared to 2019 levels. On February 24, 2022, the Company announced a further GHG emissions intensity reduction target of 50 percent compared to 2019 levels, to be achieved by 2030.

52

 


 

 

On February 24, 2022, Ovintiv announced an increase of about 43 percent to its quarterly dividend payment representing an annualized dividend of $0.80 per share of common stock as part of the Company’s commitment to returning capital to shareholders.

Financial Results

 

Reported net earnings of $1,416 million, including net losses on risk management in revenues of $1,883 million, before tax and a current income tax recovery of $156 million.

 

Generated cash from operating activities of $3,129 million, Non-GAAP Cash Flow of $3,209 million and Non‑GAAP Cash Flow Margin of $16.46 per BOE. Cash from operating activities exceeded capital expenditures by $1,610 million.

 

Paid dividends of $0.4675 per share of common stock totaling $122 million.

 

Had $4.5 billion in total liquidity as at December 31, 2021, which included available credit facilities of $4.0 billion, available uncommitted demand lines of $300 million, and cash and cash equivalents of $195 million.

 

Reduced total long-term debt by $2.1 billion.

 

Reported Net Debt to Adjusted EBITDA of 1.4 times.

Capital Investment

 

Reported total capital spending of $1,519 million, which was in line with the full year 2021 investment plan of $1.5 billion.

 

Directed $1,362 million, or 90 percent, of total capital spending to the Core Assets.

 

Focused on highly efficient capital activity and short-cycle high margin projects providing flexibility to respond to fluctuations in commodity prices.

Production

 

Produced average liquids volumes of 274.5 Mbbls/d which accounted for 51 percent of total production volumes. Average oil and plant condensate volumes of 191.2 Mbbls/d, or 70 percent of total liquids production volumes, was in line with full year 2021 updated guidance of 191.0 Mbbls/d to 194.0 Mbbls/d.

 

Produced average natural gas volumes of 1,556 MMcf/d which accounted for 49 percent of total production volumes and was in line with full year 2021 updated guidance of 1,555 MMcf/d to 1,570 MMcf/d.

Operating Expenses

 

Incurred Total Costs in 2021 of $2,613 million, or $13.42 per BOE, an increase of $300 million or $1.82 per BOE compared to 2020. Total Costs is defined in the Non-GAAP Measures section of this MD&A. Significant items in 2021 compared to 2020 impacting Total Costs include:

 

o

Higher upstream transportation and processing expenses of $162 million, primarily due to higher production volumes in Montney ($95 million) and a higher U.S./Canadian dollar exchange rate ($55 million); and

 

o

Higher production, mineral and other taxes of $120 million, primarily due to higher commodity prices.

 

Total Operating Expenses in 2021 of $7,139 million decreased by $4,345 million primarily due to the non-cash ceiling test impairments of $5,580 million recognized in 2020.

Additional information on Total Costs items and Total Operating Expenses above can be found in the Results of Operations section of this MD&A.

53

 


 

2022 Outlook

Industry Outlook

Oil Markets

The oil and gas industry is cyclical and commodity prices are inherently volatile. Oil prices reflect global supply and demand dynamics as well as the geopolitical and macroeconomic environment.

In 2021, OPEC+ production cuts and increased global demand for oil resulted in upward pressures on oil prices and the tightening of global oil inventories. Oil prices during 2022 will continue to be impacted by the global containment of the coronavirus (“COVID-19”), pace of economic recovery, OPEC+ production levels, and the potential for higher U.S. production.

COVID-19 vaccine rollout/uptake continues to drive optimism, however, emerging COVID-19 variants may impact economic progress while the gradual easing of OPEC+ oil production cuts, the potential for higher U.S. oil production, and macroeconomic risks could contribute to commodity market uncertainty. Since the second quarter of 2021, OPEC+ has gradually increased production in response to increases in oil demand. OPEC+ continues to meet regularly to review the state of global oil supply, demand and inventory levels, and is expected to continue with its planned production increases in 2022.

Natural Gas Markets

Natural gas prices are primarily affected by structural changes in supply and demand as well as deviations from seasonally normal weather. In 2021, supportive weather conditions, limited supply growth from U.S. producers and increased electricity usage contributed to increased drawdowns of natural gas inventory and higher natural gas prices. Natural gas prices in 2022 are expected to be impacted by the interplay between gas production and associated gas from oil production, as well as changes in demand from the power generation sector, changes in export levels of liquified natural gas and impacts from seasonal weather.

Company Outlook

The Company continues to exercise discretion and discipline to optimize capital allocation throughout 2022 as oil demand recovers and the commodity price environment evolves. Ovintiv pursues innovative ways to reduce upstream operating and administrative expenses and expects to benefit from durable cost savings and efficiencies to maximize cash flows.

Markets for crude oil and natural gas are exposed to different price risks and are inherently volatile. While the market price for crude oil tends to move in the same direction as the global market, regional differentials may develop. Natural gas prices may vary between geographic regions depending on local supply and demand conditions. To mitigate price volatility and help sustain revenues, particularly during periods of low commodity prices, the Company enters into derivative financial instruments. As at December 31, 2021, the Company has hedged approximately 80.0 Mbbls/d of expected oil and condensate production and 1,293 MMcf/d of expected natural gas production for 2022. In addition, Ovintiv proactively utilizes transportation contracts to diversify the Company’s sales markets, thereby reducing significant exposure to any given market and regional pricing.

Additional information on Ovintiv’s hedging program can be found in Note 25 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Capital Investment

The Company plans to spend approximately $1.5 billion on its 2022 capital investment program. The majority of this capital program is expected to be allocated to the Core Assets with a focus on maximizing returns from high margin liquids. In 2022, the Company expects to generate cash flows in excess of capital expenditures.

Ovintiv continually strives to improve well performance and lower costs through innovative techniques. Initiatives such as applying Simul-Frac techniques, a process of fracking pairs of wells at the same time instead of a single well, increases operational efficiencies and contributes to well cost savings. Ovintiv's large-scale cube development

54

 


 

model utilizes multi-well pads and advanced completion designs to maximize returns and resource recovery from its reservoirs. Ovintiv’s disciplined capital program and continuous innovation create flexibility to allocate capital in changing commodity markets and to maximize cash flows while preserving the long-term value of the Company’s multi-basin portfolio.

Production

Ovintiv is strategically positioned in the current economic environment to maintain a flat liquids production profile while generating cash flows in excess of capital expenditures.

In 2022, the Company expects average oil and plant condensate production volumes of approximately 180.0 Mbbls/d to 190.0 Mbbls/d, other NGLs production volumes of approximately 78.0 Mbbls/d to 82.0 Mbbls/d and natural gas production volumes of approximately 1,450 MMcf/d to 1,500 MMcf/d.

Operating Expenses

The Company continues to benefit from cost savings measures implemented in 2020 which included workforce reductions and operating efficiencies. With rising activity in the oil and gas industry and the recovery of commodity prices, service and supply costs are expected to increase. Ovintiv continues to pursue innovative ways to reduce upstream operating and administrative expenses, and strives to minimize any inflationary pressures with efficiency improvements and effective supply chain management.

Total Costs per BOE is expected to increase for 2022 primarily due to higher production taxes resulting from expected strengthening of commodity prices and higher transportation and processing costs. For 2022, Ovintiv expects Total Costs of approximately $14.75 per BOE to $15.25 per BOE. Total Costs is defined in the Non-GAAP Measures section of this MD&A.

Long-Term Debt Reduction

Ovintiv remains focused on strengthening its balance sheet. Since the second quarter of 2020, the Company has allocated $2,580 million in excess cash flows to reduce its total long-term debt balance, which included proceeds from the Duvernay and Eagle Ford asset divestitures. The Company expects to achieve its Net Debt balance of $3.0 billion in the second half of 2022, assuming commodity prices of $85.00 per barrel for WTI oil and $4.50 per MMBtu for NYMEX natural gas.

In June 2021, the Company redeemed its $600 million, 5.75 percent senior notes due January 30, 2022, and in August 2021, redeemed its $518 million, 3.90 percent senior notes due November 15, 2021. The combined debt redemptions will result in annualized interest savings of over $50 million.

As at December 31, 2021, the Company had no outstanding balances under its revolving credit facilities and U.S. dollar commercial paper programs.

Additional information on Ovintiv’s long-term debt and liquidity position can be found in Note 15 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and the Liquidity and Capital Resources section of this MD&A, respectively.

Additional information on Ovintiv’s 2022 Corporate Guidance can be accessed on the Company’s website at www.ovintiv.com.

Environmental, Social and Governance

Ovintiv recognizes the importance of reducing its environmental footprint and voluntarily participates in emission reduction programs. The Company has adopted a range of strategies to help reduce emissions from its operations. These strategies include incorporating new and proven technologies and optimizing processes in its drilling and completions operations, and working closely with third-party providers to develop best practices. The Company continues to look for innovative techniques and efficiencies to help maintain its commitment to emission reductions.  

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As of September 1, 2021, the Company is in alignment with the World Bank Zero Routine Flaring initiative, nine years ahead of the World Bank’s target date of 2030. Ovintiv does not engage in routine flaring by ensuring natural gas gathering infrastructure is in place for all of its producing wells.

As of December 31, 2021, the Company exceeded its targeted 33 percent reduction in methane emissions intensity four years ahead of schedule and achieved a greater than 20 percent reduction in Scope 1 and 2 GHG emissions intensity compared to 2019 levels. In 2022, the Company announced a further GHG emissions intensity reduction target of 50 percent compared to 2019 levels, to be achieved by 2030. This new emissions reduction target is also tied to its annual compensation program for all employees.

Ovintiv is committed to diversity, equity and inclusion. In 2021, the Company developed a new social commitment framework, which is rooted in the Company’s foundational values of integrity, safety, sustainability, trust and respect. The framework focuses on respecting stakeholders, strengthening communities and fostering a culture of inclusion.

Ovintiv remains committed to protecting the health and safety of its workforce. Safety is a foundational value at Ovintiv and plays a critical role in the Company’s belief that a safe workplace is a strong indicator of a well-managed business. This safety-oriented mindset enables the Company to quickly respond to emergencies and minimize any impacts to employees and business continuity. From the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, Ovintiv established a Pandemic Response Team to continually assess the impact of COVID-19 and develop protocols and procedures to maintain a safe working environment for its staff. Despite the challenges presented by COVID-19, the Company reported its eighth consecutive safest year in 2021.

Additional information on Ovintiv’s ESG practices are outlined in Items 1 and 2 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and on the Company’s sustainability website at https://sustainability.ovintiv.com.

 

 

 

 


56

 


 

 

Results of Operations

Selected Financial Information

($ millions)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product and Service Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upstream product revenues

 

$

7,420

 

 

$

4,044

 

Market optimization

 

 

3,043

 

 

 

1,459

 

Service revenues (1)

 

 

5

 

 

 

6

 

Total Product and Service Revenues

 

 

10,468

 

 

 

5,509

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gains (Losses) on Risk Management, Net

 

 

(1,883

)

 

 

507

 

Sublease Revenues

 

 

73

 

 

 

71

 

Total Revenues

 

 

8,658

 

 

 

6,087

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Expenses (2)

 

 

7,139

 

 

 

11,484

 

Operating Income (Loss)

 

 

1,519

 

 

 

(5,397

)

Total Other (Income) Expenses

 

 

280

 

 

 

333

 

Net Earnings (Loss) Before Income Tax

 

 

1,239

 

 

 

(5,730

)

Income Tax Expense (Recovery)

 

 

(177

)

 

 

367

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Earnings (Loss)

 

$

1,416

 

 

$

(6,097

)

(1)

Service revenues include amounts related to the USA and Canadian Operations.